Centre for Youth Mental Health - Research Publications

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    The impact of visual dysfunctions in recent-onset psychosis and clinical high-risk state for psychosis.
    Schwarzer, JM ; Meyhoefer, I ; Antonucci, LA ; Kambeitz-Ilankovic, L ; Surmann, M ; Bienek, O ; Romer, G ; Dannlowski, U ; Hahn, T ; Korda, A ; Dwyer, DB ; Ruef, A ; Haas, SS ; Rosen, M ; Lichtenstein, T ; Ruhrmann, S ; Kambeitz, J ; Salokangas, RKR ; Pantelis, C ; Schultze-Lutter, F ; Meisenzahl, E ; Brambilla, P ; Bertolino, A ; Borgwardt, S ; Upthegrove, R ; Koutsouleris, N ; Lencer, R ; PRONIA Consortium, (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2022-11)
    Subtle subjective visual dysfunctions (VisDys) are reported by about 50% of patients with schizophrenia and are suggested to predict psychosis states. Deeper insight into VisDys, particularly in early psychosis states, could foster the understanding of basic disease mechanisms mediating susceptibility to psychosis, and thereby inform preventive interventions. We systematically investigated the relationship between VisDys and core clinical measures across three early phase psychiatric conditions. Second, we used a novel multivariate pattern analysis approach to predict VisDys by resting-state functional connectivity within relevant brain systems. VisDys assessed with the Schizophrenia Proneness Instrument (SPI-A), clinical measures, and resting-state fMRI data were examined in recent-onset psychosis (ROP, n = 147), clinical high-risk states of psychosis (CHR, n = 143), recent-onset depression (ROD, n = 151), and healthy controls (HC, n = 280). Our multivariate pattern analysis approach used pairwise functional connectivity within occipital (ON) and frontoparietal (FPN) networks implicated in visual information processing to predict VisDys. VisDys were reported more often in ROP (50.34%), and CHR (55.94%) than in ROD (16.56%), and HC (4.28%). Higher severity of VisDys was associated with less functional remission in both CHR and ROP, and, in CHR specifically, lower quality of life (Qol), higher depressiveness, and more severe impairment of visuospatial constructability. ON functional connectivity predicted presence of VisDys in ROP (balanced accuracy 60.17%, p = 0.0001) and CHR (67.38%, p = 0.029), while in the combined ROP + CHR sample VisDys were predicted by FPN (61.11%, p = 0.006). These large-sample study findings suggest that VisDys are clinically highly relevant not only in ROP but especially in CHR, being closely related to aspects of functional outcome, depressiveness, and Qol. Findings from multivariate pattern analysis support a model of functional integrity within ON and FPN driving the VisDys phenomenon and being implicated in core disease mechanisms of early psychosis states.
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    Exploring Links Between Psychosis and Frontotemporal Dementia Using Multimodal Machine Learning: Dementia Praecox Revisited.
    Koutsouleris, N ; Pantelis, C ; Velakoulis, D ; McGuire, P ; Dwyer, DB ; Urquijo-Castro, M-F ; Paul, R ; Dong, S ; Popovic, D ; Oeztuerk, O ; Kambeitz, J ; Salokangas, RKR ; Hietala, J ; Bertolino, A ; Brambilla, P ; Upthegrove, R ; Wood, SJ ; Lencer, R ; Borgwardt, S ; Maj, C ; Nöthen, M ; Degenhardt, F ; Polyakova, M ; Mueller, K ; Villringer, A ; Danek, A ; Fassbender, K ; Fliessbach, K ; Jahn, H ; Kornhuber, J ; Landwehrmeyer, B ; Anderl-Straub, S ; Prudlo, J ; Synofzik, M ; Wiltfang, J ; Riedl, L ; Diehl-Schmid, J ; Otto, M ; Meisenzahl, E ; Falkai, P ; Schroeter, ML ; International FTD-Genetics Consortium (IFGC), the German Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (FTLD) Consortium, and the PRONIA Consortium, (American Medical Association (AMA), 2022-09-01)
    IMPORTANCE: The behavioral and cognitive symptoms of severe psychotic disorders overlap with those seen in dementia. However, shared brain alterations remain disputed, and their relevance for patients in at-risk disease stages has not been explored so far. OBJECTIVE: To use machine learning to compare the expression of structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) patterns of behavioral-variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), Alzheimer disease (AD), and schizophrenia; estimate predictability in patients with bvFTD and schizophrenia based on sociodemographic, clinical, and biological data; and examine prognostic value, genetic underpinnings, and progression in patients with clinical high-risk (CHR) states for psychosis or recent-onset depression (ROD). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: This study included 1870 individuals from 5 cohorts, including (1) patients with bvFTD (n = 108), established AD (n = 44), mild cognitive impairment or early-stage AD (n = 96), schizophrenia (n = 157), or major depression (n = 102) to derive and compare diagnostic patterns and (2) patients with CHR (n = 160) or ROD (n = 161) to test patterns' prognostic relevance and progression. Healthy individuals (n = 1042) were used for age-related and cohort-related data calibration. Data were collected from January 1996 to July 2019 and analyzed between April 2020 and April 2022. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Case assignments based on diagnostic patterns; sociodemographic, clinical, and biological data; 2-year functional outcomes and genetic separability of patients with CHR and ROD with high vs low pattern expression; and pattern progression from baseline to follow-up MRI scans in patients with nonrecovery vs preserved recovery. RESULTS: Of 1870 included patients, 902 (48.2%) were female, and the mean (SD) age was 38.0 (19.3) years. The bvFTD pattern comprising prefrontal, insular, and limbic volume reductions was more expressed in patients with schizophrenia (65 of 157 [41.2%]) and major depression (22 of 102 [21.6%]) than the temporo-limbic AD patterns (28 of 157 [17.8%] and 3 of 102 [2.9%], respectively). bvFTD expression was predicted by high body mass index, psychomotor slowing, affective disinhibition, and paranoid ideation (R2 = 0.11). The schizophrenia pattern was expressed in 92 of 108 patients (85.5%) with bvFTD and was linked to the C9orf72 variant, oligoclonal banding in the cerebrospinal fluid, cognitive impairment, and younger age (R2 = 0.29). bvFTD and schizophrenia pattern expressions forecasted 2-year psychosocial impairments in patients with CHR and were predicted by polygenic risk scores for frontotemporal dementia, AD, and schizophrenia. Findings were not associated with AD or accelerated brain aging. Finally, 1-year bvFTD/schizophrenia pattern progression distinguished patients with nonrecovery from those with preserved recovery. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Neurobiological links may exist between bvFTD and psychosis focusing on prefrontal and salience system alterations. Further transdiagnostic investigations are needed to identify shared pathophysiological processes underlying the neuroanatomical interface between the 2 disease spectra.
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    Neuroanatomical heterogeneity and homogeneity in individuals at clinical high risk for psychosis
    Baldwin, H ; Radua, J ; Antoniades, M ; Haas, SS ; Frangou, S ; Agartz, I ; Allen, P ; Andreassen, OA ; Atkinson, K ; Bachman, P ; Baeza, I ; Bartholomeusz, CF ; Chee, MWL ; Colibazzi, T ; Cooper, RE ; Corcoran, CM ; Cropley, VL ; Ebdrup, BH ; Fortea, A ; Glenthoj, LB ; Hamilton, HK ; Haut, KM ; Hayes, RA ; He, Y ; Heekeren, K ; Kaess, M ; Kasai, K ; Katagiri, N ; Kim, M ; Kindler, J ; Klaunig, MJ ; Koike, S ; Koppel, A ; Kristensen, TD ; Bin Kwak, Y ; Kwon, JS ; Lawrie, SM ; Lebedeva, I ; Lee, J ; Lin, A ; Loewy, RL ; Mathalon, DH ; Michel, C ; Mizrahi, R ; Moller, P ; Nelson, B ; Nemoto, T ; Nordholm, D ; Omelchenko, MA ; Pantelis, C ; Raghava, JM ; Rossberg, J ; Roessler, W ; Salisbury, DF ; Sasabayashi, D ; Schall, U ; Smigielski, L ; Sugranyes, G ; Suzuki, M ; Takahashi, T ; Tamnes, CK ; Tang, J ; Theodoridou, A ; Thomopoulos, S ; Tomyshev, AS ; Uhlhaas, PJ ; Vaernes, TG ; van Amelsvoort, TAMJ ; Van Erp, TGM ; Waltz, JA ; Westlye, LT ; Wood, SJ ; Zhou, JH ; McGuire, P ; Thompson, PM ; Jalbrzikowski, M ; Hernaus, D ; Fusar-Poli, P (SPRINGERNATURE, 2022-07-26)
    Individuals at Clinical High Risk for Psychosis (CHR-P) demonstrate heterogeneity in clinical profiles and outcome features. However, the extent of neuroanatomical heterogeneity in the CHR-P state is largely undetermined. We aimed to quantify the neuroanatomical heterogeneity in structural magnetic resonance imaging measures of cortical surface area (SA), cortical thickness (CT), subcortical volume (SV), and intracranial volume (ICV) in CHR-P individuals compared with healthy controls (HC), and in relation to subsequent transition to a first episode of psychosis. The ENIGMA CHR-P consortium applied a harmonised analysis to neuroimaging data across 29 international sites, including 1579 CHR-P individuals and 1243 HC, offering the largest pooled CHR-P neuroimaging dataset to date. Regional heterogeneity was indexed with the Variability Ratio (VR) and Coefficient of Variation (CV) ratio applied at the group level. Personalised estimates of heterogeneity of SA, CT and SV brain profiles were indexed with the novel Person-Based Similarity Index (PBSI), with two complementary applications. First, to assess the extent of within-diagnosis similarity or divergence of neuroanatomical profiles between individuals. Second, using a normative modelling approach, to assess the 'normativeness' of neuroanatomical profiles in individuals at CHR-P. CHR-P individuals demonstrated no greater regional heterogeneity after applying FDR corrections. However, PBSI scores indicated significantly greater neuroanatomical divergence in global SA, CT and SV profiles in CHR-P individuals compared with HC. Normative PBSI analysis identified 11 CHR-P individuals (0.70%) with marked deviation (>1.5 SD) in SA, 118 (7.47%) in CT and 161 (10.20%) in SV. Psychosis transition was not significantly associated with any measure of heterogeneity. Overall, our examination of neuroanatomical heterogeneity within the CHR-P state indicated greater divergence in neuroanatomical profiles at an individual level, irrespective of psychosis conversion. Further large-scale investigations are required of those who demonstrate marked deviation.
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    The Relationship Between Grey Matter Volume and Clinical and Functional Outcomes in People at Clinical High Risk for Psychosis.
    Tognin, S ; Richter, A ; Kempton, MJ ; Modinos, G ; Antoniades, M ; Azis, M ; Allen, P ; Bossong, MG ; Perez, J ; Pantelis, C ; Nelson, B ; Amminger, P ; Riecher-Rössler, A ; Barrantes-Vidal, N ; Krebs, M-O ; Glenthøj, B ; Ruhrmann, S ; Sachs, G ; Rutten, BPF ; de Haan, L ; van der Gaag, M ; EU-GEI High Risk Study Group, ; Valmaggia, LR ; McGuire, P (Oxford University Press (OUP), 2022-01)
    OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between baseline alterations in grey matter volume (GMV) and clinical and functional outcomes in people at clinical high risk (CHR) for psychosis. METHODS: 265 CHR individuals and 92 healthy controls were recruited as part of a prospective multi-center study. After a baseline assessment using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), participants were followed for at least two years to determine clinical and functional outcomes, including transition to psychosis (according to the Comprehensive Assessment of an At Risk Mental State, CAARMS), level of functioning (according to the Global Assessment of Functioning), and symptomatic remission (according to the CAARMS). GMV was measured in selected cortical and subcortical regions of interest (ROI) based on previous studies (ie orbitofrontal gyrus, cingulate gyrus, gyrus rectus, inferior temporal gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus, striatum, and hippocampus). Using voxel-based morphometry, we analysed the relationship between GMV and clinical and functional outcomes. RESULTS: Within the CHR sample, a poor functional outcome (GAF < 65) was associated with relatively lower GMV in the right striatum at baseline (P < .047 after Family Wise Error correction). There were no significant associations between baseline GMV and either subsequent remission or transition to psychosis. CONCLUSIONS: In CHR individuals, lower striatal GMV was associated with a poor level of overall functioning at follow-up. This finding was not related to effects of antipsychotic or antidepressant medication. The failure to replicate previous associations between GMV and later psychosis onset, despite studying a relatively large sample, is consistent with the findings of recent large-scale multi-center studies.
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    Heterogeneity and Classification of Recent Onset Psychosis and Depression: A Multimodal Machine Learning Approach
    Lalousis, PA ; Wood, SJ ; Schmaal, L ; Chisholm, K ; Griffiths, S ; Reniers, R ; Bertolino, A ; Borgwardt, S ; Brambilla, P ; Kambeitz, J ; Lencer, R ; Pantelis, C ; Ruhrmann, S ; Salokangas, RKR ; Schultze-Lutter, F ; Bonivento, C ; Dwyer, DB ; Ferro, A ; Haidl, T ; Rosen, M ; Schmidt, A ; Meisenzahl, E ; Koutsouleris, N ; Upthegrove, R (Elsevier BV, 2021-05)
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    Association of Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging Measures With Psychosis Onset in Individuals at Clinical High Risk for Developing Psychosis An ENIGMA Working Group Mega-analysis
    Jalbrzikowski, M ; Hayes, RA ; Wood, SJ ; Nordholm, D ; Zhou, JH ; Fusar-Poli, P ; Uhlhaas, PJ ; Takahashi, T ; Sugranyes, G ; Kwak, YB ; Mathalon, DH ; Katagiri, N ; Hooker, CI ; Smigielski, L ; Colibazzi, T ; Via, E ; Tang, J ; Koike, S ; Rasser, PE ; Michel, C ; Lebedeva, I ; Hegelstad, WTV ; de la Fuente-Sandoval, C ; Waltz, JA ; Mizrahi, R ; Corcoran, CM ; Resch, F ; Tamnes, CK ; Haas, SS ; Lemmers-Jansen, ILJ ; Agartz, I ; Allen, P ; Amminger, GP ; Andreassen, OA ; Atkinson, K ; Bachman, P ; Baeza, I ; Baldwin, H ; Bartholomeusz, CF ; Borgwardt, S ; Catalano, S ; Chee, MWL ; Chen, X ; Cho, KIK ; Cooper, RE ; Cropley, VL ; Dolz, M ; Ebdrup, BH ; Fortea, A ; Glenthoj, LB ; Glenthoj, BY ; de Haan, L ; Hamilton, HK ; Harris, MA ; Haut, KM ; He, Y ; Heekeren, K ; Heinz, A ; Hubl, D ; Hwang, WJ ; Kaess, M ; Kasai, K ; Kim, M ; Kindler, J ; Klaunig, MJ ; Koppel, A ; Kristensen, TD ; Kwon, JS ; Lawrie, SM ; Lee, J ; Leon-Ortiz, P ; Lin, A ; Loewy, RL ; Ma, X ; McGorry, P ; McGuire, P ; Mizuno, M ; Moller, P ; Moncada-Habib, T ; Munoz-Samons, D ; Nelson, B ; Nemoto, T ; Nordentoft, M ; Omelchenko, MA ; Oppedal, K ; Ouyang, L ; Pantelis, C ; Pariente, JC ; Raghava, JM ; Reyes-Madrigal, F ; Roach, BJ ; Rossberg, JI ; Rossler, W ; Salisbury, DF ; Sasabayashi, D ; Schall, U ; Schiffman, J ; Schlagenhauf, F ; Schmidt, A ; Sorensen, ME ; Suzuki, M ; Theodoridou, A ; Tomyshev, AS ; Tor, J ; Vaernes, TG ; Velakoulis, D ; Venegoni, GD ; Vinogradov, S ; Wenneberg, C ; Westlye, LT ; Yamasue, H ; Yuan, L ; Yung, AR ; van Amelsvoort, TAMJ ; Turner, JA ; van Erp, TGM ; Thompson, PM ; Hernaus, D (AMER MEDICAL ASSOC, 2021-05-05)
    IMPORTANCE: The ENIGMA clinical high risk (CHR) for psychosis initiative, the largest pooled neuroimaging sample of individuals at CHR to date, aims to discover robust neurobiological markers of psychosis risk. OBJECTIVE: To investigate baseline structural neuroimaging differences between individuals at CHR and healthy controls as well as between participants at CHR who later developed a psychotic disorder (CHR-PS+) and those who did not (CHR-PS-). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: In this case-control study, baseline T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data were pooled from 31 international sites participating in the ENIGMA Clinical High Risk for Psychosis Working Group. CHR status was assessed using the Comprehensive Assessment of At-Risk Mental States or Structured Interview for Prodromal Syndromes. MRI scans were processed using harmonized protocols and analyzed within a mega-analysis and meta-analysis framework from January to October 2020. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Measures of regional cortical thickness (CT), surface area, and subcortical volumes were extracted from T1-weighted MRI scans. Independent variables were group (CHR group vs control group) and conversion status (CHR-PS+ group vs CHR-PS- group vs control group). RESULTS: Of the 3169 included participants, 1428 (45.1%) were female, and the mean (SD; range) age was 21.1 (4.9; 9.5-39.9) years. This study included 1792 individuals at CHR and 1377 healthy controls. Using longitudinal clinical information, 253 in the CHR-PS+ group, 1234 in the CHR-PS- group, and 305 at CHR without follow-up data were identified. Compared with healthy controls, individuals at CHR exhibited widespread lower CT measures (mean [range] Cohen d = -0.13 [-0.17 to -0.09]), but not surface area or subcortical volume. Lower CT measures in the fusiform, superior temporal, and paracentral regions were associated with psychosis conversion (mean Cohen d = -0.22; 95% CI, -0.35 to 0.10). Among healthy controls, compared with those in the CHR-PS+ group, age showed a stronger negative association with left fusiform CT measures (F = 9.8; P < .001; q < .001) and left paracentral CT measures (F = 5.9; P = .005; q = .02). Effect sizes representing lower CT associated with psychosis conversion resembled patterns of CT differences observed in ENIGMA studies of schizophrenia (ρ = 0.35; 95% CI, 0.12 to 0.55; P = .004) and individuals with 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome and a psychotic disorder diagnosis (ρ = 0.43; 95% CI, 0.20 to 0.61; P = .001). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: This study provides evidence for widespread subtle, lower CT measures in individuals at CHR. The pattern of CT measure differences in those in the CHR-PS+ group was similar to those reported in other large-scale investigations of psychosis. Additionally, a subset of these regions displayed abnormal age associations. Widespread disruptions in CT coupled with abnormal age associations in those at CHR may point to disruptions in postnatal brain developmental processes.
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    Heterogeneity and Classification of Recent Onset Psychosis and Depression: A Multimodal Machine Learning Approach
    Lalousis, PA ; Wood, SJ ; Schmaal, L ; Chisholm, K ; Griffiths, SL ; Reniers, RLEP ; Bertolino, A ; Borgwardt, S ; Brambilla, P ; Kambeitz, J ; Lencer, R ; Pantelis, C ; Ruhrmann, S ; Salokangas, RKR ; Schultze-Lutter, F ; Bonivento, C ; Dwyer, D ; Ferro, A ; Haidl, T ; Rosen, M ; Schmidt, A ; Meisenzahl, E ; Koutsouleris, N ; Upthegrove, R (OXFORD UNIV PRESS, 2021-02-05)
    Diagnostic heterogeneity within and across psychotic and affective disorders challenges accurate treatment selection, particularly in the early stages. Delineation of shared and distinct illness features at the phenotypic and brain levels may inform the development of more precise differential diagnostic tools. We aimed to identify prototypes of depression and psychosis to investigate their heterogeneity, with common, comorbid transdiagnostic symptoms. Analyzing clinical/neurocognitive and grey matter volume (GMV) data from the PRONIA database, we generated prototypic models of recent-onset depression (ROD) vs. recent-onset psychosis (ROP) by training support-vector machines to separate patients with ROD from patients with ROP, who were selected for absent comorbid features (pure groups). Then, models were applied to patients with comorbidity, ie, ROP with depressive symptoms (ROP+D) and ROD participants with sub-threshold psychosis-like features (ROD+P), to measure their positions within the affective-psychotic continuum. All models were independently validated in a replication sample. Comorbid patients were positioned between pure groups, with ROP+D patients being more frequently classified as ROD compared to pure ROP patients (clinical/neurocognitive model: χ2 = 14.874; P < .001; GMV model: χ2 = 4.933; P = .026). ROD+P patient classification did not differ from ROD (clinical/neurocognitive model: χ2 = 1.956; P = 0.162; GMV model: χ2 = 0.005; P = .943). Clinical/neurocognitive and neuroanatomical models demonstrated separability of prototypic depression from psychosis. The shift of comorbid patients toward the depression prototype, observed at the clinical and biological levels, suggests that psychosis with affective comorbidity aligns more strongly to depressive rather than psychotic disease processes. Future studies should assess how these quantitative measures of comorbidity predict outcomes and individual responses to stratified therapeutic interventions.
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    Cognitive functioning throughout adulthood and illness stages in individuals with psychotic disorders and their unaffected siblings
    Velthorst, E ; Mollon, J ; Murray, RM ; de Haan, L ; Germeys, IM ; Glahn, DC ; Arango, C ; van der Ven, E ; Di Forti, M ; Bernardo, M ; Guloksuz, S ; Delespaul, P ; Mezquida, G ; Amoretti, S ; Bobes, J ; Saiz, PA ; Garcia-Portilla, MP ; Santos, JL ; Jimenez-Lopez, E ; Sanjuan, J ; Aguilar, EJ ; Arrojo, M ; Carracedo, A ; Lopez, G ; Gonzalez-Penas, J ; Parellada, M ; Atbasoglu, C ; Saka, MC ; Ucok, A ; Alptekin, K ; Akdede, B ; Binbay, T ; Altinyazar, V ; Ulas, H ; Yalincetin, B ; Gumus-Akay, G ; Beyaz, BC ; Soygur, H ; Cankurtaran, ES ; Kaymak, SU ; Maric, NP ; Mihaljevic, MM ; Petrovic, SA ; Mirjanic, T ; Del-Ben, CM ; Ferraro, L ; Gayer-Anderson, C ; Jones, PB ; Jongsma, HE ; Kirkbride, JB ; La Cascia, C ; Lasalvia, A ; Tosato, S ; Llorca, P-M ; Menezes, PR ; Morgan, C ; Quattrone, D ; Menchetti, M ; Selten, J-P ; Szoke, A ; Tarricone, I ; Tortelli, A ; McGuire, P ; Valmaggia, L ; Kempton, MJ ; van der Gaag, M ; Riecher-Rossler, A ; Bressan, RA ; Barrantes-Vidal, N ; Nelson, B ; McGorry, P ; Pantelis, C ; Krebs, M-O ; Ruhrmann, S ; Sachs, G ; Rutten, BPF ; van Os, J ; Alizadeh, BZ ; van Amelsvoort, T ; Bartels-Velthuis, AA ; Bruggeman, R ; van Beveren, NJ ; Luykx, JJ ; Cahn, W ; Simons, CJP ; Kahn, RS ; Schirmbeck, F ; van Winkel, R ; Reichenberg, A (SPRINGERNATURE, 2021-01-07)
    Important questions remain about the profile of cognitive impairment in psychotic disorders across adulthood and illness stages. The age-associated profile of familial impairments also remains unclear, as well as the effect of factors, such as symptoms, functioning, and medication. Using cross-sectional data from the EU-GEI and GROUP studies, comprising 8455 participants aged 18 to 65, we examined cognitive functioning across adulthood in patients with psychotic disorders (n = 2883), and their unaffected siblings (n = 2271), compared to controls (n = 3301). An abbreviated WAIS-III measured verbal knowledge, working memory, visuospatial processing, processing speed, and IQ. Patients showed medium to large deficits across all functions (ES range = -0.45 to -0.73, p < 0.001), while siblings showed small deficits on IQ, verbal knowledge, and working memory (ES = -0.14 to -0.33, p < 0.001). Magnitude of impairment was not associated with participant age, such that the size of impairment in older and younger patients did not significantly differ. However, first-episode patients performed worse than prodromal patients (ES range = -0.88 to -0.60, p < 0.001). Adjusting for cannabis use, symptom severity, and global functioning attenuated impairments in siblings, while deficits in patients remained statistically significant, albeit reduced by half (ES range = -0.13 to -0.38, p < 0.01). Antipsychotic medication also accounted for around half of the impairment in patients (ES range = -0.21 to -0.43, p < 0.01). Deficits in verbal knowledge, and working memory may specifically index familial, i.e., shared genetic and/or shared environmental, liability for psychotic disorders. Nevertheless, potentially modifiable illness-related factors account for a significant portion of the cognitive impairment in psychotic disorders.
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    Neurobiologically Based Stratification of Recent- Onset Depression and Psychosis: Identification of Two Distinct Transdiagnostic Phenotypes
    Lalousis, PA ; Schmaal, L ; Wood, SJ ; Reniers, RLEP ; Barnes, NM ; Chisholm, K ; Griffiths, SL ; Stainton, A ; Wen, J ; Hwang, G ; Davatzikos, C ; Wenzel, J ; Kambeitz-Ilankovic, L ; Andreou, C ; Bonivento, C ; Dannlowski, U ; Ferro, A ; Lichtenstein, T ; Riecher-Rossler, A ; Romer, G ; Upthegrove, R ; Lencer, R ; Pantelis, C ; Ruhrmann, S ; Salokangas, RKR ; Schultze-Lutter, F ; Schmidt, A ; Meisenzahl, E ; Koutsouleris, N ; Dwyer, D ; Rosen, M ; Bertolino, A ; Borgwardt, S ; Brambilla, P ; Kambeitz, J (ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC, 2022-10-01)
    BACKGROUND: Identifying neurobiologically based transdiagnostic categories of depression and psychosis may elucidate heterogeneity and provide better candidates for predictive modeling. We aimed to identify clusters across patients with recent-onset depression (ROD) and recent-onset psychosis (ROP) based on structural neuroimaging data. We hypothesized that these transdiagnostic clusters would identify patients with poor outcome and allow more accurate prediction of symptomatic remission than traditional diagnostic structures. METHODS: HYDRA (Heterogeneity through Discriminant Analysis) was trained on whole-brain volumetric measures from 577 participants from the discovery sample of the multisite PRONIA study to identify neurobiologically driven clusters, which were then externally validated in the PRONIA replication sample (n = 404) and three datasets of chronic samples (Centre for Biomedical Research Excellence, n = 146; Mind Clinical Imaging Consortium, n = 202; Munich, n = 470). RESULTS: The optimal clustering solution was two transdiagnostic clusters (cluster 1: n = 153, 67 ROP, 86 ROD; cluster 2: n = 149, 88 ROP, 61 ROD; adjusted Rand index = 0.618). The two clusters contained both patients with ROP and patients with ROD. One cluster had widespread gray matter volume deficits and more positive, negative, and functional deficits (impaired cluster), and one cluster revealed a more preserved neuroanatomical signature and more core depressive symptomatology (preserved cluster). The clustering solution was internally and externally validated and assessed for clinical utility in predicting 9-month symptomatic remission, outperforming traditional diagnostic structures. CONCLUSIONS: We identified two transdiagnostic neuroanatomically informed clusters that are clinically and biologically distinct, challenging current diagnostic boundaries in recent-onset mental health disorders. These results may aid understanding of the etiology of poor outcome patients transdiagnostically and improve development of stratified treatments.
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    Verbal memory performance predicts remission and functional outcome in people at clinical high-risk for psychosis
    Hedges, EP ; Dickson, H ; Tognin, S ; Modinos, G ; Antoniades, M ; van der Gaag, M ; de Haan, L ; McGorry, P ; Pantelis, C ; Riecher-Rossler, A ; Bressan, R ; Barrantes-Vidal, N ; Krebs, M-O ; Nordentoft, M ; Ruhrmann, S ; Sachs, G ; Rutten, BP ; van Os, J ; Valmaggia, LR ; McGuire, P ; Kempton, MJ (ELSEVIER, 2022-06-01)
    Robust deficits in cognitive functioning are present in people with psychosis and are evident in the early stages of the disorder. Impairments in verbal memory and verbal fluency are reliably seen in individuals at clinical high-risk for psychosis (CHR) compared to healthy populations. As previous studies have shown a relationship between cognition and longer-term outcomes in schizophrenia, the aim of this paper was to explore whether verbal memory and verbal fluency performance predicted outcomes in a large CHR sample recruited as part of the EU-GEI High Risk Study. Participants included 316 CHR individuals, 90.8% of whom were not currently on antipsychotic medication, and 60 healthy controls. Verbal memory and verbal fluency performance were measured at baseline. At two-year follow-up, CHR individuals were assessed by three different outcome measures, those who did and did not (1) transition to psychosis, (2) experience burdening impairment or disabilities, or (3) remit clinically from CHR status. Individuals with CHR displayed significant verbal memory and verbal fluency deficits at baseline compared to healthy controls (Hedges' g effect size = 0.24 to 0.66). There were no significant differences in cognitive performance of those who did and did not transition to psychosis. However, impaired immediate verbal recall predicted both functional disability and non-remission from the CHR state. Results remained significant when analyses were restricted to only include antipsychotic-free CHR participants. These findings may inform the development of early interventions designed to improve cognitive deficits in the early stages of psychosis.