Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research - Research Publications

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    The Australian industrial relations reform agenda
    WOODEN, MP (Department of Economics, The University of Melbourne, 2005)
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    Modelling Longitudinal Survey Response: The Experience of the HILDA Survey
    Watson, N ; WOODEN, M (Australian Consortium for Social and Political Research Inc (ACSPRI), 2006)
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    The dynamics of income poverty in Australia: Evidence from the First Three Waves of the HILDA Survey
    HEADEY, BW ; MARKS, G ; WOODEN, MP (Australia Council of Social Service, 2005)
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    Paid Annua Leave and Working Hours: Evidence from the HILDA Survey
    Wooden, M ; Warren, D (SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC, 2008-09-01)
    Using data from wave 5 of the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey, this study examines: (1) the extent to which Australian employees use their annual leave entitlements; and (2) the association between annual leave taking and weekly hours of work. After restricting attention to employees likely to have entitlement to at least 4 weeks of paid annual leave, it is found that the mean number of days of leave taken per year is around 16 and that the majority of employees (63%) take less than 20. The incidence of annual leave taking is found to vary positively with the number of usual weekly hours of work, but the size of this effect is small and weak.
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    Household wealth in Australia: its components, distribution and correlates
    MARKS, G ; HEADEY, BW ; WOODEN, MP (Sage Publications, 2005)
    Using data from the second wave of the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey, conducted in 2002, this article provides information on the composition, distribution and correlates of the wealth holdings of Australian households. The survey results indicate that Australian households have an average net worth (or wealth) of just over A$400,000, comprising assets of $473,000 and debts of $68,000. The largest component of wealth is home equity. The degree of inequality across households in wealth inequality is found to be much larger than the inequality in income and varies substantially with age and, to a lesser extent, with household type and education. Age, socio-economic background, educational attainment, marital status and the number of children can account for about 30 percent of the variation across households in (logged) wealth.
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    The effects of household joblessness on mental health
    Scutella, R ; Wooden, M (PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD, 2008-07-01)
    It is widely assumed that the economic and social costs that unemployment gives rise to must be exacerbated where joblessness is concentrated within families. This hypothesis is tested in this paper. Specifically, data from the first five waves of the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia Survey (HILDA), a nationally representative household panel survey administered in Australia, are used to test whether jobless individuals score worse on a measure of mental health when they live in households with other jobless people. Consistent with previous research, unemployment is found to be associated with lower levels of mental health. No evidence, however, can be found for any additional disadvantage to the unemployed stemming from living in a jobless household.