Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research - Research Publications

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    Steel pipe dreams: A China-Guinea and China-Africa lens on prospects for Simandou’s iron ore
    Johnston, LA (Elsevier, 2017)
    A shift in the drivers of China's economy underlies contemporary change in iron ore and steel markets. Medium-term structural change also lies on the horizon with rising Chinese investment in Africa. Home to the world’s largest known and highest-grade iron ore deposit, as well as a history of friendly political ties with Beijing, Guinea offers an important study of related China-Africa political economy and of the emerging iron ore and steel-intensive industrial ties being promoted by Beijing in Africa. Toward understanding long-run and indirect international iron ore market drivers this paper describes directions in China's prospective interest in Simandou in a China-Guinea and China-Africa economic and political economy context. China's selection of Guinea and Sierra Leone among priority partners in Africa, and promise to help these countries and Liberia realize a prosperous ‘post-Ebola’ era suggest potential for structural change in their integration with the world economy. For China this could offer vast iron ore resources to feed its win-win industrialisation agenda with and in Africa. It could also see selective commodity markets increasingly driven by intra-developing country dynamics – a trend that itself could induce more favourable prospects for the exploitation of Simandou and for Guinea’s economic development.
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    China-Africa economic transitions survey: Charting the return of a fleeting old normal
    JOHNSTON, L ; Kelly, M (African Studies Association of Australasia and the Pacific, 2016)
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    China’s Africa trade and investment policies: review of a “Noodle Bowl”
    Johnston, LA ; Cheng, Y (Stellenbosch University, 2014)
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    Domestic Transformation in the Global Context
    Garnaut, R ; Song, L ; Fang, C ; Johnston, L ; Song, L ; Garnaut, R ; Fang, C ; Johnston, L (AUSTRALIAN NATL UNIV, 2015-01-01)
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    Boom to Cusp Prospecting the `new normal' in China and Africa
    Johnston, L ; Song, L ; Garnaut, R ; Fang, C ; Johnston, L (AUSTRALIAN NATL UNIV, 2015-01-01)
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    China’s Domestic Transformation in a Global Context
    Song, L ; Garnaut, R ; Fang, C ; Johnston, L (ANU Press, 2015-07-08)
    Domestic reform is defined as those reforms applying to the intra-country financial system, including interest rate controls, credit controls, prudential regulations, supervision of the banking sector and equity market policy. Capital reforms ...
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    Getting Rich after Getting Old: China's demographic and economic transition in dynamic international context
    Johnston, L ; Liu, X ; Yang, M ; Zhang, X ; Song, L ; Garnaut, R ; Fang, C ; Johnston, L (AUSTRALIAN NATL UNIV, 2016-01-01)
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    China's New Sources of Economic Growth: Vol. 1
    Song, L ; Garnaut, R ; Fang, C ; Johnston, L ; JOHNSTON, L ; Garnaut, R ; Song, L ; Fang, C (ANU Press, 2016-07-01)
    China’s change to a new model of growth, now called the ‘new normal’, was always going to be hard. Events over the past year show how hard it is. The attempts to moderate the extremes of high investment and low consumption, the correction of overcapacity in the heavy industries that were the mainstays of the old model of growth, the hauling in of the immense debt hangover from the fiscal and monetary expansion that pulled China out of the Great Crash of 2008 would all have been hard at any time. They are harder when changes in economic policy and structure coincide with stagnation in global trade and rising protectionist sentiment in developed countries, extraordinarily rapid demographic change and recognition of the urgency of easing the environmental damage from the old model. China’s economy has slowed and there are worries that the authorities will not be able to contain the slowdown within preferred limits. This year’s Update explores the challenge of the slowdown in growth and the change in economic structure. Leading experts on China’s economy and environment review change within China’s new model of growth, and its interaction with ageing, environmental pressure, new patterns of urbanisation, and debt problems at different levels of government. It illuminates some new developments in China’s economy, including the transformational potential of internet banking, and the dynamics of financial market instability. China’s economic development since 1978 is full of exciting change, and this year’s China Update is again the way to know it as it is happening