Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research - Research Publications

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    A Managed Clinical Network for Cardiac Services: set-up, operation and impact on patient care.
    Hamilton, ESTC ; Sullivan, M ; Donnan, T ; Taylor, ; Ikenwilo, ; SCOTT, A ; Baker, ; Wyke, ( 2005)
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    Devolved government and public sector pay reform: Considerations of equity and efficiency
    Elliott, RF ; Bell, D ; Scott, A ; Ma, A ; Roberts, E (ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2005-06-01)
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    DESIGNING CHOICE EXPERIMENTS WITH MANY ATTRIBUTES. AN APPLICATION TO SETTING PRIORITIES FOR ORTHOPAEDIC WAITING LISTS
    Witt, J ; Scott, A ; Osborne, RH (WILEY, 2009-06-01)
    The aim of this paper is to undertake a discrete choice experiment using a 'blocked attribute' design. To date in the health economics literature, most discrete choice experiments have used only a relatively small number of attributes due to concerns about task complexity, non-compensatory decision rules, simplicity of experimental designs, and the costs of surveys. This may lead to omitted variable bias and reduced explanatory power when attributes have been pre-selected from a longer list. There may be situations where it is desirable to include a longer list of attributes, such as attaching weights to quality-of-life instruments to obtain single index scores. We examine this issue in the context of attaching weights to a disease-specific quality-of-life instrument used to prioritise patients on orthopaedic waiting lists in Victorian hospitals. Eleven attributes are allocated across three separate experimental designs and the data pooled for analysis. Pooling is justified given the specific context of the study, including attempts to minimise the effect of unobserved heterogeneity across the three models when designing the study and collecting data. Blocked attribute designs may offer flexibility to researchers when it is not possible or desirable to reduce the number of attributes.
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    THE EFFECTS OF AN INCENTIVE PROGRAM ON QUALITY OF CARE IN DIABETES MANAGEMENT
    Scott, A ; Schurer, S ; Jensen, PH ; Sivey, P (WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2009-09-01)
    An incentive program for general practitioners to encourage systematic and igh-quality care in chronic disease management was introduced in Australia in 1999. There is little empirical evidence and ambiguous theoretical guidance on which effects to expect. This paper evaluates the impact of the incentive program on quality of care in diabetes, as measured by the probability of ordering an HbA1c test. The empirical analysis is conducted with a unique data set and a bivariate probit model to control for the self-selection process of practices into the program. The study finds that the incentive program increased the probability of an HbA1c test being ordered by 20 percentage points and that participation in the program is facilitated by the support of Divisions of General Practice.
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    Job satisfaction and quitting intentions: A structural model of British general practitioners
    Scott, A ; Gravelle, H ; Simoens, S ; Bojke, C ; Sibbald, B (BLACKWELL PUBLISHING, 2006-09-01)
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    The effects of pay and job satisfaction on the labour supply of hospital consultants
    Ikenwilo, D ; Scott, A (WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2007-12-01)
    There is little evidence about the responsiveness of doctors' labour supply to changes in pay. Given substantial increases in NHS expenditure, new national contracts for hospital doctors and general practitioners that involve increases in pay, and the gradual imposition of a ceiling on hours worked through the European Working Time Directive, knowledge of the size of labour supply elasticities is crucial in examining the effects of these major changes. This paper estimates a modified labour supply model for hospital consultants, using data from a survey of consultants in Scotland. Rigidities in wage setting within the NHS mean that the usual specification of the labour supply model is extended by the inclusion of job quality (job satisfaction) in the equation explaining the optimal number of hours worked. Generalised Method of Moments estimation is used to account for the endogeneity of both earnings and job quality. Our results confirm the importance of pay and non-pay factors on the supply of labour by consultants. The results are sensitive to the exclusion of job quality and show a slight underestimation of the uncompensated earnings elasticity (of 0.09) without controlling for the effect of job quality, and 0.12 when we controlled for job quality. Pay increases in the new contract for consultants will only result in small increases in hours worked. Small and non-significant elasticity estimates at higher quantiles in the distribution of hours suggest that any increases in hours worked are more likely for consultants who work part time. Those currently working above the median number of hours are much less responsive to changes in earnings.
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    Geographically differentiated pay in the labour market for nurses
    Elliott, RF ; Ma, AHY ; Scott, A ; Bell, D ; Roberts, E (ELSEVIER, 2007-01-01)
    This novel application of spatial wage theory to health service labour markets analyses the competitiveness of nurse's pay and how this differs between local labour markets in Britain. A switching regression model is estimated to derive standardised spatial wage differentials (SSWDs) for nurses and their comparators. An SSWD gap is constructed and its relationship to vacancies estimated. A reduction in the gap in a local area is shown to result in an increase in the long-term vacancy rate for National Health Service (NHS) nurses. The competitiveness of nursing pay is shown to have a strong effect on the ability of the NHS to attract and retain nurses.
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    THE PATTERN AND EVOLUTION OF GEOGRAPHICAL WAGE DIFFERENTIALS IN THE PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SECTORS IN GREAT BRITAIN
    BELL, D ; ELLIOTT, RF ; MA, ADA ; SCOTT, A ; ROBERTS, E (Wiley, 2007-07)
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    The supply of qualified nurses: a classical model of labour supply
    Skatun, D ; Antonazzo, E ; Scott, A ; Elliott, RF (ROUTLEDGE TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2005-01-20)
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    The labour market for nursing: a review of the labour supply literature
    Antonazzo, E ; Scott, A ; Skatun, D ; Elliott, RF (WILEY, 2003-06-01)
    The need to ensure adequate numbers of motivated health professionals is at the forefront of the modernisation of the UK NHS. The aim of this paper is to assess current understanding of the labour supply behaviour of nurses, and to propose an agenda for further research. In particular, the paper reviews American and British economics literature that focuses on empirical econometric studies based on the classical static labour supply model. American research could be classified into first generation, second generation and recent empirical evidence. Advances in methods mirror those in the general labour economics literature, and include the use of limited dependent variable models and the treatment of sample selection issues. However, there is considerable variation in results, which depends on the methods used, particularly on the effect of wages. Only one study was found that used UK data, although other studies examined the determinants of turnover, quit rates and job satisfaction. The agenda for further empirical research includes the analysis of discontinuities in the labour supply function, the relative importance of pecuniary and non-pecuniary job characteristics, and the application of dynamic and family labour supply models to nursing research. Such research is crucial to the development of evidence-based policies.