Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research - Research Publications

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Now showing 1 - 7 of 7
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    Innovation and the determinants of company survival
    Buddelmeyer, H ; Jensen, PH ; Webster, E (OXFORD UNIV PRESS, 2010-04-01)
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    Contract Type and the Cost of Provision: Evidence from Maintenance Service Contracts
    Jensen, PH ; Stonecash, RE (WILEY-BLACKWELL PUBLISHING, INC, 2009-06-01)
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    HOSPITAL TYPE AND PATIENT OUTCOMES: AN EMPIRICAL EXAMINATION USING AMI READMISSION AND MORTALITY RECORDS
    Jensen, PH ; Webster, E ; Witt, J (WILEY, 2009-12-01)
    This paper investigates whether there are differences in patient outcomes across different types of hospitals using patient-level data on readmission and mortality associated with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Hospitals are grouped according to their ownership type (private, public teaching, public non-teaching) and their location (metropolitan, country and remote country). Using data collected from 130 Victorian hospitals on 19,000 patients admitted to a hospital with their first AMI between January 2001 and December 2003, we consider how the likelihood of unplanned re-admission and mortality varies across hospital type. We find that there are significant differences across hospital types in the observed patient outcomes - private hospitals persistently outperform public hospitals.
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    THE EFFECTS OF AN INCENTIVE PROGRAM ON QUALITY OF CARE IN DIABETES MANAGEMENT
    Scott, A ; Schurer, S ; Jensen, PH ; Sivey, P (WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2009-09-01)
    An incentive program for general practitioners to encourage systematic and igh-quality care in chronic disease management was introduced in Australia in 1999. There is little empirical evidence and ambiguous theoretical guidance on which effects to expect. This paper evaluates the impact of the incentive program on quality of care in diabetes, as measured by the probability of ordering an HbA1c test. The empirical analysis is conducted with a unique data set and a bivariate probit model to control for the self-selection process of practices into the program. The study finds that the incentive program increased the probability of an HbA1c test being ordered by 20 percentage points and that participation in the program is facilitated by the support of Divisions of General Practice.
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    Firm size and the use of intellectual property rights
    Jensen, PH ; Webster, E (WILEY, 2006-03-01)
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    Incentives and the efficiency of public sector-outsourcing contracts
    Jensen, PH ; Stonecash, RE (WILEY, 2005-12-01)
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    Innovation, Technological Conditions and New Firm Survival
    Jensen, PH ; Webster, E ; Buddelmeyer, H (WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2008-12-01)