School of BioSciences - Research Publications

Permanent URI for this collection

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 5 of 5
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Using Computer-Assisted Argument Mapping to Teach Reasoning to Students
    Davies, W ; van Gelder, T ; Barnett, A ; Blair, A (Windsor Studies in Argumentation, 2021-03-01)
    Critical thinking deserves both imaginative teaching and serious theoretical attention. Studies in Critical Thinking assembles an all-star cast to serve both.
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Gene Regulatory Network Inference
    Babtie, AC ; Stumpf, MPH ; Thorne, T (Elsevier, 2021)
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Scicurious as method: Learning from GLAM Young People Living in a Pandemic about Cultivating Digital Co-Research-Creation Spaces that Ignite Curiosity and Creativity
    Coleman, K ; Healy, S ; Wouters, N ; Martin, J ; Campbell, L ; Peck, S ; Belton, A ; Hiscock, R ; Kara, H ; Khoo, S-M (Policy Press, 2020)
    Could COVID-​19, this unexpected crisis, act as a comma 6 in a co-​research-​creation project to become a breathing space and not a full stop? Maybe this pause is a colon: the two different periods of the project (and life in general) on either side of the pandemic, equally important and dependent on each other for full meaning. In this chapter, we tell the story of how a co-​research-​creation event (the Sci Curious Project) unfolded before and during the COVID-​19 pandemic 7 ; the lead-​up to its irruption (St. Pierre, 1997) and then what came after. ‘Scicurious as method’ emerged out of the unexpected pause and recalibration of the project; a method that emphasizes the creation of research spaces that activate scicuriosity in situated practice. We understand scicuriosity as emerging from collaborative research-​creation events that ignite curiosity and creativity. Scicurious as method is presented through an encounter with speculative fiction and scicurious zine travels. Scicurious as method has significant ethical implications, these reify the potential of co-​designed speculative inquiries with creativity and curiosity at their heart. This is, in part, due to its contingency on cultivating digital co-​research-​creation spaces that enfold rather than eschew the analogue and highlight the joyous potential of a deeply situated, co-​designed speculative inquiry; an inquiry with galleries, libraries, archives and museums (GLAM) young people living in a pandemic.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Model structures and structural identifiability:What? Why? How?
    Whyte, J ; Wood, D ; de Gier, J ; Praeger, C ; Tao, T (Springer Verlag, 2021-02-11)
    We may attempt to encapsulate what we know about a physical system by a model structure, S. This collection of related models is defined by parametric relationships between system features; say observables (outputs), unobservable variables (states), and applied inputs. Each parameter vector in some parameter space is associated with a completely specified model in S. Before choosing a model in S to predict system behaviour, we must estimate its parameters from system observations. Inconveniently, multiple models (associated with distinct parameter estimates) may approximate data equally well. Yet, if these equally valid alternatives produce dissimilar predictions of unobserved quantities, then we cannot confidently make predictions. Thus, our study may not yield any useful result. We may anticipate the non-uniqueness of parameter estimates ahead of data collection by testing S for structural global identifiability (SGI). Here we will provide an overview of the importance of SGI, some essential theory and distinctions, and demonstrate these in testing some examples.
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Scanning horizons in research, policy and practice
    Wintle, B ; Kennicutt II, MC ; Sutherland, WJ ; Sutherland, WJ ; Brotherton, P ; Davies, Z ; Pettorelli, N ; Vira, B ; Vickery, J (Cambridge University Press, 2020-04-01)
    New and emerging environmental issues make policy and practice difficult. A pressing need to respond when knowledge of the problem is limited is added to an already challenging conservation agenda. Horizon-scanning is an evolving approach that draws on diverse information sources to identify early indications of poorly recognised threats and opportunities. There are many ways to conduct horizon scans, ranging from automated techniques that scan online content and mine text to manual methods that systematically consult large groups of people (often experts). These different approaches aim to sort through vast volumes of information to look for signals of change, for example the rise in microplastics or the use of mobile phones to gather data in remote forests. Identifying these new threats and opportunities is the first important step towards further researching and managing them. This chapter reviews different approaches to horizon-scanning, together with ways of encouraging uptake of scanning outputs. It concludes by introducing emerging technologies that will add value to horizon-scanning in the future.