Office for Environmental Programs - Theses

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    Are cool roofs worth it for Melbourne
    Whimpey, Bruce Gregory ( 2011)
    Roofs are important assets in the struggle to reduce the carbon footprint of buildings. Cool roof technology offers one way in which this can be tackled. The concept is being tested via the establishment of some sheds with cool roofs at the Burnley campus of Melbourne University. TRNSYS is being utilised in order to predict the thermal response of the test huts and those results are being compared against measured temperatures. A marked temperature decrease has been noted in the summer temperatures of the sheds with cool roof coatings
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    Post-occupancy evaluation on the Venny: an investigation into the impacts of occupant behaviour in relation to the performance of a small passively cooled building in Melbourne through post-occupancy evaluation
    Raj, Alissa Jeyam ( 2011)
    Buildings hardly perform as they were designed to; even the most efficiently designed building cannot guarantee its performance. This research paper investigates the impact of occupant behaviour in relation to the performance of a small, passively cooled building in Melbourne through the use of a Post-Occupancy Evaluation (POE). This paper is the second phase of a research project on the Venny, with the first phase of the research consisting of the building simulation on the Venny. The simulation showed promising results of the Venny's performance with regard to the Indoor Environment Quality (IEQ) of the occupants and energy efficiency. This research, aims to answer the following three key questions: 1. What is the actual performance of the Venny, and how accurate is the thermal and energy modelling at predicting its actual performance? 2. What are the causes and effects of the difference, and how much influence does occupant behaviour have on the results? 3. What have we learnt from the POE of the Venny? This paper is aiming to highlight the importance of the POE and to promote it as a mandatory tool for all building projects in Melbourne, in order to increase sustainability and decrease the impact of buildings on climate change.
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    Living building challenge materials petal: lessons learned from the Sustainable Buildings Research Centre in Australia
    Lewis, Weston ( 2014)
    Sustainable materials sourcing and implementation in green building projects has proven to be one of the most difficult aspects in achieving highly sustainable buildings and regenerative development. This can be partly attributed to the lack of transparency within the materials economy and the large number of materials being used in construction. On the other hand, the process of designing and constructing buildings greatly affects sustainability outcomes. This paper identifies process challenges and strategies to the implementation of the Living Building Challenge's Materials Petal, which is considered one of the most advanced green building rating systems available. Interviews from the Sustainable Buildings Research Center's project team identifies specific strategies for achieving Material Imperatives, while also revealing overarching management and design strategies that can make implementation of the Living Building Challenge's a more effective and efficient process. These strategies include integrated project delivery, valuing sustainability, designing for simplicity, and contractor capacity building. While material markets still have many opportunities for development, employing these strategies can help projects achieve greater sustainability outcomes by redefining the design and construction process.