Psychiatry - Research Publications

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    Non-negative matrix factorisation improves Centiloid robustness in longitudinal studies
    Bourgeat, P ; Dore, V ; Doecke, J ; Ames, D ; Masters, CL ; Rowe, CC ; Fripp, J ; Villemagne, VL (ACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCE, 2021-02-01)
    BACKGROUND: Centiloid was introduced to harmonise β-Amyloid (Aβ) PET quantification across different tracers, scanners and analysis techniques. Unfortunately, Centiloid still suffers from some quantification disparities in longitudinal analysis when normalising data from different tracers or scanners. In this work, we aim to reduce this variability using a different analysis technique applied to the existing calibration data. METHOD: All PET images from the Centiloid calibration dataset, along with 3762 PET images from the AIBL study were analysed using the recommended SPM pipeline. The PET images were SUVR normalised using the whole cerebellum. All SUVR normalised PiB images from the calibration dataset were decomposed using non-negative matrix factorisation (NMF). The NMF coefficients related to the first component were strongly correlated with global SUVR and were subsequently used as a surrogate for Aβ retention. For each tracer of the calibration dataset, the components of the NMF were computed in a way such that the coefficients of the first component would match those of the corresponding PiB. Given the strong correlations between the SUVR and the NMF coefficients on the calibration dataset, all PET images from AIBL were subsequently decomposed using the computed NMF, and their coefficients transformed into Centiloids. RESULTS: Using the AIBL data, the correlation between the standard Centiloid and the novel NMF-based Centiloid was high in each tracer. The NMF-based Centiloids showed a reduction of outliers, and improved longitudinal consistency. Furthermore, it removed the effects of switching tracers from the longitudinal variance of the Centiloid measure, when assessed using a linear mixed effects model. CONCLUSION: We here propose a novel image driven method to perform the Centiloid quantification. The methods is highly correlated with standard Centiloids while improving the longitudinal reliability when switching tracers. Implementation of this method across multiple studies may lend to more robust and comparable data for future research.
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    Assessment of the DTI-ALPS Parameter Along the Perivascular Space in Older Adults at Risk of Dementia
    Steward, CE ; Venkatraman, VK ; Lui, E ; Malpas, CB ; Ellis, KA ; Cyarto, EV ; Vivash, L ; O'Brien, TJ ; Velakoulis, D ; Ames, D ; Masters, CL ; Lautenschlager, NT ; Bammer, R ; Desmond, PM (WILEY, 2021-02-08)
    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Recently, there has been growing interest in the glymphatic system (the functional waste clearance pathway for the central nervous system and its role in flushing solutes (such as amyloid ß and tau), metabolic, and other cellular waste products in the brain. Herein, we investigate a recent potential biomarker for glymphatic activity (the diffusion tensor imaging along the perivascular space [DTI-ALPS] parameter) using diffusion MRI imaging in an elderly cohort comprising 10 cognitively normal, 10 mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 16 Alzheimer's disease (AD). METHODS: All 36 participants imaged on a Siemens 3.0T Tim Trio. Single-SE diffusion weighted Echo-planar imaging scans were acquired as well as T1 magnetization prepared rapid gradient echo, T2 axial, and susceptibility weighted imaging. Three millimeter regions of interest were drawn in the projection and association fibers adjacent to the medullary veins at the level of the lateral ventricle. The DTI-ALPS parameter was calculated in these regions and correlated with cognitive status, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and ADASCog11 measures. RESULTS: Significant correlations were found between DTI-ALPS and MMSE and ADASCog11 in the right hemisphere adjusting for age, sex, and APoE ε4 status. Significant differences were also found in the right DTI-ALPS indices between cognitively normal and AD groups (P < .026) and MCI groups (P < .025) in a univariate general linear model corrected for age, sex, and APoE ε4. Significant differences in apparent diffusion coefficient between cognitively normal and AD groups were found in the right projection fibers (P = .028). CONCLUSION: Further work is needed to determine the utility of DTI-ALPS index in larger elderly cohorts and whether it measures glymphatic activity.
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    Trajectories of depressive and anxiety symptoms in older adults: a 6-year prospective cohort study
    Holmes, SE ; Esterlis, I ; Mazure, CM ; Lim, YY ; Ames, D ; Rainey-Smith, S ; Fowler, C ; Ellis, K ; Martins, RN ; Salvado, O ; Dore, V ; Villemagne, VL ; Rowe, CC ; Laws, SM ; Masters, CL ; Pietrzak, RH ; Maruff, P (WILEY, 2018-02-01)
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    Cerebrovascular disease, Alzheimer's disease biomarkers and longitudinal cognitive decline
    Yates, PA ; Villemagne, VL ; Ames, D ; Masters, CL ; Martins, RN ; Desmond, P ; Burnham, S ; Maruff, P ; Ellis, KA ; Rowe, CC (WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2016-06-01)
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    Amyloid burden and incident depressive symptoms in cognitively normal older adults
    Harrington, KD ; Gould, E ; Lim, YY ; Ames, D ; Pietrzak, RH ; Rembach, A ; Rainey-Smith, S ; Martins, RN ; Salvado, O ; Villemagne, VL ; Rowe, CC ; Masters, CL ; Maruff, P (WILEY, 2017-04-01)
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    Increased cerebral blood flow with increased amyloid burden in the preclinical phase of alzheimer's disease
    Fazlollahi, A ; Calamante, F ; Liang, X ; Bourgeat, P ; Raniga, P ; Dore, V ; Fripp, J ; Ames, D ; Masters, CL ; Rowe, CC ; Connelly, A ; Villemagne, VL ; Salvado, O (WILEY, 2020-02-01)
    BACKGROUND: Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is an emerging MRI technique for noninvasive measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF) that has been used to show hemodynamic changes in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease (AD). CBF changes have been measured using positron emission tomography (PET) across the AD spectrum, but ASL showed limited success in measuring CBF variations in the preclinical phase of AD, where amyloid β (Aβ) plaques accumulate in the decades prior to symptom onset. PURPOSE: To investigate the relationship between CBF measured by multiphase-pseudocontinuous-ASL (MP-PCASL) and Aβ burden as measured by 11 C-PiB PET imaging in a study of cognitively normal (CN) subjects age over 65. STUDY TYPE: Cross-sectional. POPULATION: Forty-six CN subjects including 33 with low levels of Aβ burden and 13 with high levels of Aβ. FIELD STRENGTH/SEQUENCE: 3T/3D MP-PCASL. ASSESSMENT: The MP-PCASL method was chosen because it has a high signal-to-noise ratio. Furthermore, the data were analyzed using an efficient processing pipeline consisting of motion correction, ASL motion correction imprecision removal, temporal and spatial filtering, and partial volume effect correction. STATISTICAL TESTS: General Linear Model. RESULTS: In CN subjects positive for Aβ burden (n = 13), we observed a positive correlation between CBF and Aβ burden in the hippocampus, amygdala, caudate (P < 0.01), frontal, temporal, and insula (P < 0.05). DATA CONCLUSION: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study using MP-PCASL in the study of AD, and the results suggest a potential compensatory hemodynamic mechanism that protects against pathology in the early stages of AD. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 3 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2020;51:505-513.
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    Fifteen Years of the Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle (AIBL) Study: Progress and Observations from 2,359 Older Adults Spanning the Spectrum from Cognitive Normality to Alzheimer's Disease
    Fowler, C ; Rainey-Smith, SR ; Bird, S ; Bomke, J ; Bourgeat, P ; Brown, BM ; Burnham, SC ; Bush, A ; Chadunow, C ; Collins, S ; Doecke, J ; Dore, V ; Ellis, KA ; Evered, L ; Fazlollahi, A ; Fripp, J ; Gardener, SL ; Gibson, S ; Grenfell, R ; Harrison, E ; Head, R ; Jin, L ; Kamer, A ; Lamb, F ; Lautenschlager, NT ; Laws, SM ; Li, Q-X ; Lim, L ; Lim, YY ; Louey, A ; Macaulay, SL ; Mackintosh, L ; Martins, RN ; Maruff, P ; Masters, CL ; McBride, S ; Milicic, L ; Peretti, M ; Pertile, K ; Porter, T ; Radler, M ; Rembach, A ; Robertson, J ; Rodrigues, M ; Rowe, CC ; Rumble, R ; Salvado, O ; Savage, G ; Silbert, B ; Soh, M ; Sohrabi, HR ; Taddei, K ; Taddei, T ; Thai, C ; Trounson, B ; Tyrrell, R ; Vacher, M ; Varghese, S ; Villemagne, VL ; Weinborn, M ; Woodward, M ; Xia, Y ; Ames, D (IOS PRESS, 2021-01-01)
    BACKGROUND: The Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle (AIBL) Study commenced in 2006 as a prospective study of 1,112 individuals (768 cognitively normal (CN), 133 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 211 with Alzheimer's disease dementia (AD)) as an 'Inception cohort' who underwent detailed ssessments every 18 months. Over the past decade, an additional 1247 subjects have been added as an 'Enrichment cohort' (as of 10 April 2019). OBJECTIVE: Here we provide an overview of these Inception and Enrichment cohorts of more than 8,500 person-years of investigation. METHODS: Participants underwent reassessment every 18 months including comprehensive cognitive testing, neuroimaging (magnetic resonance imaging, MRI; positron emission tomography, PET), biofluid biomarkers and lifestyle evaluations. RESULTS: AIBL has made major contributions to the understanding of the natural history of AD, with cognitive and biological definitions of its three major stages: preclinical, prodromal and clinical. Early deployment of Aβ-amyloid and tau molecular PET imaging and the development of more sensitive and specific blood tests have facilitated the assessment of genetic and environmental factors which affect age at onset and rates of progression. CONCLUSION: This fifteen-year study provides a large database of highly characterized individuals with longitudinal cognitive, imaging and lifestyle data and biofluid collections, to aid in the development of interventions to delay onset, prevent or treat AD. Harmonization with similar large longitudinal cohort studies is underway to further these aims.
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    Association of beta-Amyloid Level, Clinical Progression, and Longitudinal Cognitive Change in Normal Older Individuals
    Van der Kall, LM ; Thanh, T ; Burnham, SC ; Dore, V ; Mulligan, RS ; Bozinovski, S ; Lamb, F ; Bourgeat, P ; Fripp, J ; Schultz, S ; Lim, YY ; Laws, SM ; Ames, D ; Fowler, C ; Rainey-Smith, SR ; Martins, RN ; Salvado, O ; Robertson, J ; Maruff, P ; Masters, CL ; Villemagne, VL ; Rowe, CC (LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS, 2021-02-02)
    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of β-amyloid (Aβ) level on progression risk to mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or dementia and longitudinal cognitive change in cognitively normal (CN) older individuals. METHODS: All CN from the Australian Imaging Biomarkers and Lifestyle study with Aβ PET and ≥3 years follow-up were included (n = 534; age 72 ± 6 years; 27% Aβ positive; follow-up 5.3 ± 1.7 years). Aβ level was divided using the standardized 0-100 Centiloid scale: <15 CL negative, 15-25 CL uncertain, 26-50 CL moderate, 51-100 CL high, >100 CL very high, noting >25 CL approximates a positive scan. Cox proportional hazards analysis and linear mixed effect models were used to assess risk of progression and cognitive decline. RESULTS: Aβ levels in 63% were negative, 10% uncertain, 10% moderate, 14% high, and 3% very high. Fifty-seven (11%) progressed to MCI or dementia. Compared to negative Aβ, the hazard ratio for progression for moderate Aβ was 3.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3-7.6; p < 0.05), for high was 7.0 (95% CI 3.7-13.3; p < 0.001), and for very high was 11.4 (95% CI 5.1-25.8; p < 0.001). Decline in cognitive composite score was minimal in the moderate group (-0.02 SD/year, p = 0.05), while the high and very high declined substantially (high -0.08 SD/year, p < 0.001; very high -0.35 SD/year, p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: The risk of MCI or dementia over 5 years in older CN is related to Aβ level on PET, 5% if negative vs 25% if positive but ranging from 12% if 26-50 CL to 28% if 51-100 CL and 50% if >100 CL. This information may be useful for dementia risk counseling and aid design of preclinical AD trials.
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    Association Between Cognitive Function and Clustered Cardiovascular Risk of Metabolic Syndrome in Older Adults at Risk of Cognitive Decline
    Lai, MMY ; Ames, DJ ; Cox, KL ; Ellis, KA ; Sharman, MJ ; Hepworth, G ; Desmond, P ; Cyarto, E ; Szoeke, C ; Martins, R ; Masters, CL ; Lautenschlager, NT (SPRINGER FRANCE, 2020-02-11)
    OBJECTIVES: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) represents a cluster of obesity and insulin resistance-related comorbidities. Abdominal obesity, hypertension, elevated triglyceride and glucose levels are components of MetS and may have a negative effect on cognitive function, but few cognitive studies have examined the combined risk severity. We sought to determine which specific cognitive abilities were associated with MetS in older adults at risk of cognitive decline. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. PARTICIPANTS: 108 AIBL Active participants with memory complaints and at least one cardiovascular risk factor. MEASUREMENTS: Cardiovascular parameters and blood tests were obtained to assess metabolic syndrome criteria. The factors of MetS were standardized to obtain continuous z-scores. A battery of neuropsychological tests was used to evaluate cognitive function. RESULTS: Higher MetS z-scores were associated with poorer global cognition using ADAS-cog (adjusted standardized beta=0.26, SE 0.11, p<0.05) and higher Trail Making B scores (adjusted beta=0.23, SE 0.11, p<0.05). Higher MetS risk was related to lower cognitive performance. CONCLUSION: Combined risk due to multiple risk factors in MetS was related to lower global cognitive performance and executive function. A higher MetS risk burden may point to opportunities for cognitive testing in older adults as individuals may experience cognitive changes.
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    Association of Plasma A beta Peptides with Blood Pressure in the Elderly
    Lambert, J-C ; Dallongeville, J ; Ellis, KA ; Schraen-Maschke, S ; Lui, J ; Laws, S ; Dumont, J ; Richard, F ; Cottel, D ; Berr, C ; Ames, D ; Masters, CL ; Rowe, CC ; Szoeke, C ; Tzourio, C ; Dartigues, J-F ; Buee, L ; Martins, R ; Amouyel, P ; Gravenor, MB (PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE, 2011-04-15)
    BACKGROUND: Aß peptides are often considered as catabolic by-products of the amyloid ß protein precursor (APP), with unknown physiological functions. However, several biological properties have been tentatively attributed to these peptides, including a role in vasomotion. We assess whether plasma Aß peptide levels might be associated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure values (SBP and DBP, respectively). METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Plasma Aß(1-40) and Aß(1-42) levels were measured using an xMAP-based assay in 1,972 individuals (none of whom were taking antihypertensive drugs) from 3 independent studies: the French population-based 3C and MONA-LISA (Lille) studies (n = 627 and n = 769, respectively) and the Australian, longitudinal AIBL study (n = 576). In the combined sample, the Aß(1-42)/ Aß(1-40) ratio was significantly and inversely associated with SBP (p = 0.03) and a similar trend was observed for DBP (p = 0.06). Using the median age (69) as a cut-off, the Aß(1-42)/Aß(1-40) ratio was strongly associated with both SBP and DBP in elderly individuals (p = 0.002 and p = 0.03, respectively). Consistently, a high Aß(1-42)/ Aß(1-40) ratio was associated with a lower risk of hypertension in both the combined whole sample (odds ratio [OR], 0.71; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.56-0.90) and (to an even greater extent) in the elderly subjects (OR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.37-0.75). Lastly, all these associations appeared to be primarily driven by the level of plasma Aß(1-40). CONCLUSION: The plasma Aß(1-42)/Aß(1-40) ratio is inversely associated with SBP, DBP and the risk of hypertension in elderly subjects, suggesting that Aß peptides affect blood pressure in vivo. These results may be particularly relevant in Alzheimer's disease, in which a high Aß(1-42)/Aß(1-40) plasma ratio is reportedly associated with a decreased risk of incident disease.