Melbourne Medical School Collected Works - Research Publications

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    Health information work - a scoping review protocol
    Gray, K ; Gilbert, C (PeerJ, 2019-02-15)

    Background:

    The work of managing health data, health information or health knowledge is a vital, yet unacknowledged, function in our current health system. This protocol is for a literature review which explores the evolution and development of the concept of health information work. Methodology: A scoping review of published literature in the domains of health sciences, information technology and information sciences has been carried out. A thematic and bibliometric analysis of the resulting set of publications is currently being undertaken.

    Results:

    The review results will shed light on the responsibilities and the contribution of the health information workforce, with a synthesis of themes identified in the literature, and analysis of publication year spans, prominent authors, institutions and source journals.
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    Digital Health and Professional Identity in Australian Health Libraries: Evidence from the 2018 Australian Health Information Workforce Census
    Gilbert, C ; Gray, K ; Butler-Henderson, K ; Ritchie, A (University of Alberta, 2020-01-01)
    Objective-This research aimed to examine the characteristics of the current health library professional workforce in Australia. The study also sought to explore the areas of health library competency domains and job functions that may reflect progress toward a specialized digital health information capability. Methods-Health librarians' responses to the May 2018 Australian Health Information Workforce Census were analysed and compared with results obtained in earlier census counts. The health librarian characteristics were also compared with other health information occupations included in the Census. Results-There were 238 usable health librarian responses. These indicate that the health librarian workforce continues to be a comparatively mature population, with substantial experience, increasing involvement in data-and technology-intensive functions, high levels of professional association membership, and participation in continuing education activities. Notably there are emerging role titles and job functions which point to a greater digital health focus in the changing work realm. Conclusion-The health librarian workforce has adapted its skills, in line with the increased digital emphasis in health information work. However, as with other health information occupational groups, it is possible that health system planners and funders are not aware of librarians' current functions and skills. This mature workforce may undergo significant attrition and consequent loss of expertise in the next decade. Continued advocacy and strategic planning around these factors with workforce, healthcare quality, and educational organizations will be required.
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    Research data management in health and biomedical citizen science: practices and prospects
    Borda, A ; Gray, K ; Fu, Y (Oxford University Press (OUP), 2019)
    Background: Public engagement in health and biomedical research is being influenced by the paradigm of citizen science. However, conventional health and biomedical research relies on sophisticated research data management tools and methods. Considering these, what contribution can citizen science make in this field of research? How can it follow research protocols and produce reliable results? Objective: The aim of this article is to analyze research data management practices in existing biomedical citizen science studies, so as to provide insights for members of the public and of the research community considering this approach to research. Methods: A scoping review was conducted on this topic to determine data management characteristics of health and bio medical citizen science research. From this review and related web searching, we chose five online platforms and a specific research project associated with each, to understand their research data management approaches and enablers. Results: Health and biomedical citizen science platforms and projects are diverse in terms of types of work with data and data management activities that in themselves may have scientific merit. However, consistent approaches in the use of research data management models or practices seem lacking, or at least are not prevalent in the review. Conclusions: There is potential for important data collection and analysis activities to be opaque or irreproducible in health and biomedical citizen science initiatives without the implementation of a research data management model that is transparent and accessible to team members and to external audiences. This situation might be improved with participatory development of standards that can be applied to diverse projects and platforms, across the research data life cycle.
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    Health information work - a scoping review protocol
    Gray, K ; Gilbert, C (PeerJ Preprints, 2019-02-15)
    Background: The work of managing health data, health information or health knowledge is a vital, yet unacknowledged, function in our current health system. This protocol is for a literature review which explores the evolution and development of the concept of health information work. Methodology: A scoping review of published literature in the domains of health sciences, information technology and information sciences has been carried out. A thematic and bibliometric analysis of the resulting set of publications is currently being undertaken. Results: The review results will shed light on the responsibilities and the contribution of the health information workforce, with a synthesis of themes identified in the literature, and analysis of publication year spans, prominent authors, institutions and source journals.
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    Measuring the outcomes of using person-generated health data: a case study of developing a PROM item bank
    Dimaguila, GL ; Gray, K ; Merolli, M (BMJ Publishing Group, 2019-08)
    INTRODUCTION: Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) allow patients to self-report the status of their health condition or experience independently. A key area for PROMs to contribute in building the evidence base is in understanding the effects of using person-generated health data (PGHD), and using PROMs to measure outcomes of using PGHD has been suggested in the literature. Key considerations inherent in the stroke rehabilitation context makes the measurement of PGHD outcomes in home-based poststroke rehabilitation, which uses body-tracking technologies, an important use case. OBJECTIVE: This paper describes the development of a preliminary item bank of a PROM-PGHD for Kinect-based stroke rehabilitation systems (K-SRS), or PROM-PGHD for K-SRS. METHODS: The authors designed a method to develop PROMs of using PGHD, or PROM-PGHD. The PROM-PGHD Development Method was designed by augmenting a key PROM development process, the Qualitative Item Review, and follows PROM development best practice. It has five steps, namely, literature review; binning and winnowing; initial item revision; eliciting patient input and final item Revision. RESULTS: A preliminary item bank of the PROM-PGHD for K-SRS is presented. This is the result of implementing the first three steps of the PROM-PGHD Development Method within the domains of interest, that is, stroke and Kinect-based simulated rehabilitation. CONCLUSIONS: This paper has set out a case study of our method, showing what needs to be done to ensure that the PROM-PGHD items are suited to the health condition and technology category. We described it as a case study because we argue that it is possible for the PROM-PGHD method to be used by others to measure effects of PGHD utilisation in other cases of health conditions and technology categories. Hence, it offers generalisability and has broader clinical relevance for evidence-based practice with PGHD. This paper is the first to offer a case study of developing a PROM-PGHD.
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    The use of self-quantification systems for personal health information: big data management activities and prospects
    Almalki, M ; Gray, K ; Sanchez, FM (SPRINGER, 2015-12-01)
    BACKGROUND: Self-quantification is seen as an emerging paradigm for health care self-management. Self-quantification systems (SQS) can be used for tracking, monitoring, and quantifying health aspects including mental, emotional, physical, and social aspects in order to gain self-knowledge. However, there has been a lack of a systematic approach for conceptualising and mapping the essential activities that are undertaken by individuals who are using SQS in order to improve health outcomes. In this paper, we propose a new model of personal health information self-quantification systems (PHI-SQS). PHI-SQS model describes two types of activities that individuals go through during their journey of health self-managed practice, which are 'self-quantification' and 'self-activation'. OBJECTIVES: In this paper, we aimed to examine thoroughly the first type of activity in PHI-SQS which is 'self-quantification'. Our objectives were to review the data management processes currently supported in a representative set of self-quantification tools and ancillary applications, and provide a systematic approach for conceptualising and mapping these processes with the individuals' activities. METHOD: We reviewed and compared eleven self-quantification tools and applications (Zeo Sleep Manager, Fitbit, Actipressure, MoodPanda, iBGStar, Sensaris Senspod, 23andMe, uBiome, Digifit, BodyTrack, and Wikilife), that collect three key health data types (Environmental exposure, Physiological patterns, Genetic traits). We investigated the interaction taking place at different data flow stages between the individual user and the self-quantification technology used. FINDINGS: We found that these eleven self-quantification tools and applications represent two major tool types (primary and secondary self-quantification systems). In each type, the individuals experience different processes and activities which are substantially influenced by the technologies' data management capabilities. CONCLUSIONS: Self-quantification in personal health maintenance appears promising and exciting. However, more studies are needed to support its use in this field. The proposed model will in the future lead to developing a measure for assessing the effectiveness of interventions to support using SQS for health self-management (e.g., assessing the complexity of self-quantification activities, and activation of the individuals).
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    Internet Protocol Television for Personalized Home-Based Health Information: Design-Based Research on a Diabetes Education System
    Gray, KM ; Clarke, K ; Kwong, ML ; Alzougool, BM ; Hines, C ; Tidhar, G ; FRUKHTMAN, F (JMIR Research Protocols, 2014)
    Background: The use of Internet protocol television (IPTV) as a channel for consumer health information is a relatively under-explored area of medical Internet research. IPTV may afford new opportunities for health care service providers to provide health information and for consumers, patients, and caretakers to access health information. The technologies of Web 2.0 add a new and even less explored dimension to IPTV’s potential. Objective: Our research explored an application of Web 2.0 integrated with IPTV for personalized home-based health information in diabetes education, particularly for people with diabetes who are not strong computer and Internet users, and thus may miss out on Web-based resources. We wanted to establish whether this system could enable diabetes educators to deliver personalized health information directly to people with diabetes in their homes; and whether this system could encourage people with diabetes who make little use of Web-based health information to build their health literacy via the interface of a home television screen and remote control. Methods: This project was undertaken as design-based research in two stages. Stage 1 comprised a feasibility study into the technical work required to integrate an existing Web 2.0 platform with an existing IPTV system, populated with content and implemented for user trials in a laboratory setting. Stage 2 comprised an evaluation of the system by consumers and providers of diabetes information. Results: The project succeeded in developing a Web 2.0 IPTV system for people with diabetes and low literacies and their diabetes educators. The performance of the system in the laboratory setting gave them the confidence to engage seriously in thinking about the actual and potential features and benefits of a more widely-implemented system. In their feedback they pointed out a range of critical usability and usefulness issues related to Web 2.0 affordances and learning fundamentals. They also described their experiences with the system in terms that bode well for its educational potential, and they suggested many constructive improvements to the system. Conclusions: The integration of Web 2.0 and IPTV merits further technical development, business modeling, and health services and health outcomes research, as a solution to extend the reach and scale of home-based health care.
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    Education as ehealth infrastructure: considerations in advancing a national agenda for ehealth
    Hilberts, S ; Gray, K (SPRINGER, 2014-03-01)
    This paper explores the role of education as infrastructure in large-scale ehealth strategies-in theory, in international practice and in one national case study. Education is often invisible in the documentation of ehealth infrastructure. Nevertheless a review of international practice shows that there is significant educational investment made in implementing national ehealth agendas. Disparate views about the role of education are implicit in the ehealth strategy literature, while there is a shortage of evidence-based accounts of ehealth education. In the case of Australia, the benefits and challenges of a broadly collaborative approach to ehealth education are highlighted through activities of various types occurring on many levels to support the implementation of a national ehealth system. This paper concludes that although evidence-based practice is a given in other areas of healthcare, and although there are many published evaluations of ehealth usability and acceptance in the health informatics literature, there is surprisingly little evidence about what works and doesn't work with regard to the ehealth education.
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