Chancellery Research - Research Publications

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    Optic nerve tissue displacement during mild intraocular pressure elevation: its relationship to central corneal thickness and corneal hysteresis
    Bedggood, P ; Tanabe, F ; McKendrick, AM ; Turpin, A ; Anderson, AJ ; Bui, BV (WILEY, 2018-07-01)
    PURPOSE: To determine the extent to which (1) optic nerve tissue is displaced following mild acute elevation of intraocular pressure, and (2) clinically accessible measures at the anterior eye can be used as a surrogate for such displacements. METHODS: We imaged the optic disc of 21 healthy subjects before and after intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation of ~10 mmHg delivered by ophthalmodynamometry. Steady-state tissue displacement during IOP elevation was assessed axially from OCT data, and laterally from SLO data. Recovery from IOP elevation was assessed by tracking a single vertical B-scan through the cup centre. Anatomical structures were demarcated by three masked clinicians to determine lateral shifts for temporal cup edge and central disc vessels, and axial shifts of disc surface and anterior lamina cribrosa. Spatial maps of deformation were constructed within the demarcated cup and disc to assess within-tissue displacement. Measured displacements were correlated with corneal hysteresis, corneal thickness, and IOP. RESULTS: The temporal cup edge moved more temporally with higher baseline IOP (R2  = 0.33, p = 0.006) and with lesser elevation of IOP (R2  = 0.43, p = 0.001); it moved more superiorly for thinner corneas (R2  = 0.35, p = 0.007). Thinner corneas also produced less within-cup deformation, relative to that of the disc (R2  = 0.39, p = 0.004). Axial displacement of the lamina and lateral displacement of vessels were often substantial (lamina 20 ± 15 μm, range 1-60 μm; vessels 37 ± 25 μm, range 2-102 μm) but did not correlate with measured parameters. Recovery from IOP elevation did not take more than 300-400 ms in any subject. CONCLUSIONS: Mild acute elevation of IOP produces large and rapidly reversible shifts in optic nerve tissue in young, healthy eyes. The resulting degree, direction and spatial distribution of cup movement are associated with IOP status and corneal thickness, but not corneal hysteresis.
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    Orientation of the Temporal Nerve Fiber Raphe in Healthy and in Glaucomatous Eyes
    Bedggood, P ; Nguyen, B ; Lakkis, G ; Turpin, A ; McKendrick, AM (ASSOC RESEARCH VISION OPHTHALMOLOGY INC, 2017-08-01)
    Purpose: To determine the normal variation in orientation of the temporal nerve fiber raphe, and the accuracy with which it may be predicted or approximated in lieu of direct measurement. Methods: We previously described an algorithm for automatic measurement of raphe orientation from optical coherence tomography, using the intensity of vertically oriented macular cubes. Here this method was applied in 49 healthy participants (age 19-81 years) and 51 participants with primary open angle glaucoma (age 51-80 years). Results: Mean fovea-disc-raphe angle was 173.5° ± 3.2° (range = 166°-182°) and 174.2° ± 3.4° (range = 166°-184°) in healthy and glaucoma patients, respectively. Differences between groups were not significant. Fovea-disc-raphe angle was not correlated with age or axial length (P > 0.4), showed some symmetry between eyes in glaucoma (R2 = 0.31, P < 0.001), and little symmetry in the healthy group (P = 0.06). Fovea-disc angle was correlated with fovea-raphe angle (R2 = 0.27, P = 0.0001), but was not a good predictor for raphe orientation (average error = 6.8°). The horizontal axis was a better predictor (average error = 3.2°; maximum error = 9.6°), but still gave approximately twice the error previously reported for direct measurement from macular cubes. Conclusions: There is substantial natural variation in temporal nerve fiber raphe orientation, which cannot be predicted from age, axial length, relative geometry of the disc and fovea, or the contralateral eye. For applications to which the orientation of the raphe is considered important, it should be measured directly.
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    Automatic identification of the temporal retinal nerve fiber raphe from macular cube data
    Bedggood, P ; Tanabe, F ; McKendrick, AM ; Turpin, A (OPTICAL SOC AMER, 2016-10-01)
    We evaluated several approaches for automatic location of the temporal nerve fiber raphe from standard macular cubes acquired on a Heidelberg Spectralis OCT. Macular cubes with B-scan separation of 96-122 µm were acquired from 15 healthy participants, and "high density" cubes with scan separation of 11 µm were acquired from the same eyes. These latter scans were assigned to experienced graders for subjective location of the raphe, providing the ground truth by which to compare methods operating on the lower density data. A variety of OCT scan parameters and image processing strategies were trialed. Vertically oriented scans, purposeful misalignment of the pupil to avoid reflective artifacts, and the use of intensity as opposed to thickness of the nerve fiber layer were all critical to minimize error. The best performing approach "cFan" involved projection of a fan of lines from each of several locations across the foveal pit; in each fan the line of least average intensity was identified. The centroid of the crossing points of these lines provided the raphe orientation with an average error of 1.5° (max = 4.1°) relative to the human graders. The disc-fovea-raphe angle was 172.4 ± 2.3° (range = 168.5-176.2°), which agrees well with other published estimates.