Physiotherapy - Research Publications

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    Home-based pulmonary rehabilitation for COPD using minimal resources: An economic analysis
    Burge, AT ; Holland, AE ; McDonald, CF ; Abramson, MJ ; Hill, CJ ; Lee, AL ; Cox, NS ; Moore, R ; Nicolson, C ; O'Halloran, P ; Lahham, A ; Gillies, R ; Mahal, A (WILEY, 2019-08-16)
    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to compare the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of home and centre-based pulmonary rehabilitation for adults with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). METHODS: Prospective economic analyses were undertaken from a health system perspective alongside a randomized controlled equivalence trial in which participants referred to pulmonary rehabilitation undertook a standard 8-week outpatient centre-based or a new home-based programme. Participants underwent clinical assessment prior to programme commencement, immediately following completion and 12 months following programme completion. They provided data for utility (quality-adjusted life years (QALY) determined using SF6D (utility scores for health states) calculated from 36-Item Short Form Health Survey version 2) and effectiveness (change in distance walked on 6-min walk test (Δ6MWD) following pulmonary rehabilitation ). Individual-level cost data for the 12 months following programme completion was sourced from healthcare administration and government databases. RESULTS: Between-group mean difference point estimates for cost (-$4497 (95% CI: -$12 250 to $3257), utility (0.025 (-0.038 to 0.086) QALY) and effectiveness (14 m (-11 to 39) Δ6MWD) favoured the home-based group. Cost-utility analyses demonstrated 63% of estimates falling in the dominant southeast quadrant and the probability that the new home-based model was cost-effective at a $0 threshold for willingness to pay was 78%. Results were robust to a range of sensitivity analyses. Programme completion was associated with significantly lower healthcare costs in the following 12 months. CONCLUSION: Home-based pulmonary rehabilitation provides a cost-effective alternative model for people with COPD who cannot access traditional centre-based programmes.
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    Comparison of self-report and administrative data sources to capture health care resource use in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease following pulmonary rehabilitation
    Grimwood, CL ; Holland, AE ; McDonald, CF ; Mahal, A ; Hill, CJ ; Lee, AL ; Cox, NS ; Moore, R ; Nicolson, C ; O'Halloran, P ; Lahham, A ; Gillies, R ; Burge, AT (BMC, 2020-11-23)
    BACKGROUND: The optimal method to collect accurate healthcare utilisation data in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is not well established. The aim of this study was to determine feasibility and compare self-report and administrative data sources to capture health care resource use in people with COPD for 12 months following pulmonary rehabilitation. METHODS: This is a secondary analysis of a randomised controlled equivalence trial comparing centre-based and home-based pulmonary rehabilitation. Healthcare utilisation data were collected for 12 months following pulmonary rehabilitation from self-report (monthly telephone questionnaires and diaries) and administrative sources (Medicare Benefits Schedule, medical records). Feasibility was assessed by the proportion of self-reports completed and accuracy was established using month-by-month and per participant comparison of self-reports with administrative data. RESULTS: Data were available for 145/163 eligible study participants (89%, mean age 69 (SD 9) years, mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s 51 (SD 19) % predicted; n = 83 male). For 1725 months where data collection was possible, 1160 (67%) telephone questionnaires and 331 (19%) diaries were completed. Accuracy of recall varied according to type of health care encounter and self-report method, being higher for telephone questionnaire report of emergency department presentation (Kappa 0.656, p < 0.001; specificity 99%, sensitivity 59%) and hospital admission (Kappa 0.669, p < 0.001; specificity 97%, sensitivity 68%) and lower for general practitioner (Kappa 0.400, p < 0.001; specificity 62%, sensitivity 78%) and medical specialist appointments (Kappa 0.458, p < 0.001; specificity 88%, sensitivity 58%). A wide variety of non-medical encounters were reported (allied health and nursing) which were not captured in administrative data. CONCLUSION: For self-reported methods of healthcare utilisation in people with COPD following pulmonary rehabilitation, monthly telephone questionnaires were more frequently completed and more accurate than diaries. Compared to administrative records, self-reports of emergency department presentations and inpatient admissions were more accurate than for general practitioner and medical specialist appointments. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT01423227 at clinicaltrials.gov.
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    Factors predicting progression of exercise training loads in people with interstitial lung disease
    Nakazawa, A ; Dowman, LM ; Cox, NS ; McDonald, CF ; Hill, CJ ; Lee, AL ; Holland, AE (EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY SOC JOURNALS LTD, 2019-10-01)
    In ILD, adherence to the training sessions in pulmonary rehabilitation predicts progression of exercise training loads; declining lung function is an independent predictor of failure to progress training loads http://bit.ly/2Z4x9Nw.
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    The short and long term effects of exercise training in non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis - a randomised controlled trial
    Lee, AL ; Hill, CJ ; Cecins, N ; Jenkins, S ; McDonald, CF ; Burge, AT ; Rautela, L ; Stirling, RG ; Thompson, PJ ; Holland, AE (BMC, 2014-04-15)
    BACKGROUND: Exercise training is recommended for non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis, but the long-term effects are unclear. This randomised controlled trial aimed to determine the effects of exercise training and review of airway clearance therapy (ACT) on exercise capacity, health related quality of life (HRQOL) and the incidence of acute exacerbations in people with non-CF bronchiectasis. METHODS: Participants were randomly allocated to 8 weeks of supervised exercise training and review of ACT, or control. Primary outcomes of exercise capacity and HRQOL (Chronic respiratory disease questionnaire) and secondary outcomes of cough-related QOL (Leicester cough questionnaire) and psychological symptoms (Hospital anxiety and depression scale) were measured at baseline, following completion of the intervention period and at 6 and 12 months follow up. Secondary outcomes of the exacerbation rate and time to first exacerbation were analysed over 12 months. RESULTS: Eighty-five participants (mean FEV1 74% predicted; median Modified Medical Research Council Dyspnoea grade of 1 (IQR [1-3]) were included. Exercise training increased the incremental shuttle walk distance (mean difference to control 62 m, 95% CI 24 to 101 m) and the 6-minute walking distance (mean difference to control 41 m, 95% CI 19 to 63 m), but these improvements were not sustained at 6 or 12 months. Exercise training reduced dyspnoea (p = 0.009) and fatigue (p = 0.01) but did not impact on cough-related QOL or mood. Exercise training reduced the frequency of acute exacerbations (median 1[IQR 1-3]) compared to the control group (2[1-3]) over 12 months follow up (p = 0.012), with a longer time to first exacerbation with exercise training of 8 months (95% CI 7 to 9 months) compared to the control group (6 months [95% CI 5 to 7 months], p = 0.047). CONCLUSIONS: Exercise training in bronchiectasis is associated with short term improvement in exercise capacity, dyspnoea and fatigue and fewer exacerbations over 12 months. TRIAL REGISTRY: ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00885521).
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    The effects of pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis: protocol for a randomised controlled trial
    Lee, AL ; Cecins, N ; Hill, CJ ; Holland, AE ; Rautela, L ; Stirling, RG ; Thompson, PJ ; McDonald, CF ; Jenkins, S (BMC, 2010-01-01)
    BACKGROUND: Non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis is characterised by sputum production, exercise limitation and recurrent infections. Although pulmonary rehabilitation is advocated for this patient group, its effects are unclear. The aims of this study are to determine the short and long term effects of pulmonary rehabilitation on exercise capacity, cough, quality of life and the incidence of acute pulmonary exacerbations. METHODS/DESIGN: This randomised controlled trial aims to recruit 64 patients with bronchiectasis from three tertiary institutions. Participants will be randomly allocated to the intervention group (supervised, twice weekly exercise training with regular review of airway clearance therapy) or a control group (twice weekly telephone support). Measurements will be taken at baseline, immediately following the intervention and at six and 12 months following the intervention period by a blinded assessor. Exercise capacity will be measured using the incremental shuttle walk test and the six-minute walk test. Quality of life and health status will be measured using the Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire, Leicester Cough Questionnaire, Assessment of Quality of Life Questionnaire and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The rate of hospitalisation will be captured as well as the incidence of acute pulmonary exacerbations using a daily symptom diary. DISCUSSION: Results from this study will help to determine the efficacy of supervised twice-weekly pulmonary rehabilitation upon exercise capacity and quality of life in patients with bronchiectasis and will contribute to clinical practice guidelines for physiotherapists in the management of this population. TRIAL REGISTRATION: This study protocol is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00885521).
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    Postural Control and Fear of Falling Assessment in People With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Systematic Review of Instruments, International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Linkage, and Measurement Properties
    Oliveira, CC ; Lee, A ; Granger, CL ; Miller, KJ ; Irving, LB ; Denehy, L (W B SAUNDERS CO-ELSEVIER INC, 2013-09-01)
    OBJECTIVES: To systematically review the instruments used to assess postural control and fear of falling in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and to synthesize and evaluate their breadth of content and measurement properties. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, CINAHL, CENTRAL, PsycINFO, PEDro, and OTSeeker databases searched in September 2012. STUDY SELECTION: Two independent reviewers performed the selection of articles, the ICF linking process and quality assessment. Only quantitative studies were included, irrespective of language or publication date. DATA EXTRACTION: This systematic review comprised two phases. Phase 1 aimed to identify the commonly used instruments to assess postural control and fear of falling in the COPD literature. The breadth of content of each instrument was examined based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). In phase 2, a measurement property search filter was adopted and used in four electronic databases to retrieve properties reported in the COPD population. The COSMIN checklist was used to assess the methodological quality of each measurement property reported. DATA SYNTHESIS: Seventeen out of 401 publications were eligible in phase 1. Seventeen instruments were identified including 15 for postural control and 2 for fear of falling assessment. The Berg Balance Scale, the Short Physical Performance Battery, and the Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) scale were the most frequently used instruments to assess postural control and fear of falling respectively. The ICF categories covered varied considerably among instruments. The Balance Evaluation Systems test and ABC presented the greatest breadth of content. Measurement properties reported included criterion predictive validity (4 instruments), construct validity (11 instruments) and responsiveness (1 instrument), with inconsistent findings based on 'fair' and 'poor' quality studies. CONCLUSIONS: Different instruments with heterogeneous content have been used to assess postural control and fear of falling outcomes. Standardized assessment methods and best evidence on measurement properties is required in the COPD literature.
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    Proximal and distal gastro-oesophageal reflux in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchiectasis
    Lee, AL ; Button, BM ; Denehy, L ; Roberts, SJ ; Bamford, TL ; Ellis, SJ ; Mu, F-T ; Heine, RG ; Stirling, RG ; Wilson, JW (WILEY, 2014-02-01)
    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The aims of this observational study were (i) to examine the prevalence of symptomatic and clinically silent proximal and distal gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or bronchiectasis, (ii) the presence of gastric aspiration, and (iii) to explore the possible clinical significance of this comorbidity in these conditions. METHODS: Twenty-seven participants with COPD, 27 with bronchiectasis and 17 control subjects completed reflux symptom evaluation and dual-channel 24 h oesophageal pH monitoring. In those with lung disease, pepsin levels in sputum samples were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, with disease severity (lung function and high-resolution computed tomography) also measured. RESULTS: The prevalence of GOR in COPD was 37%, in bronchiectasis was 40% and in control subjects was 18% (P = 0.005). Of those diagnosed with GOR, clinically silent reflux was detected in 20% of participants with COPD and 42% with bronchiectasis. While pepsin was found in 33% of COPD and 26% of bronchiectasis participants, the presence of pepsin in sputum was not related to a diagnosis of GOR based on oesophageal pH monitoring in either condition. Neither a diagnosis of GOR nor the presence of pepsin was associated with increased severity of lung disease in COPD or bronchiectasis. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of GOR in COPD or bronchiectasis is twice that of the control population, and the diagnosis could not be based on symptoms alone. Pepsin was detected in sputum in COPD and bronchiectasis, suggesting a possible role of pulmonary aspiration, which requires further exploration.