Physiotherapy - Research Publications

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    Hospital clinicians' psychosocial well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic: longitudinal study
    Wynter, K ; Holton, S ; Trueman, M ; Bruce, S ; Sweeney, S ; Crowe, S ; Dabscheck, A ; Eleftheriou, P ; Booth, S ; Hitch, D ; Said, CM ; Haines, KJ ; Rasmussen, B (OXFORD UNIV PRESS, 2022-03-19)
    BACKGROUND: Hospital clinicians report poor psychosocial well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic. Few studies have reported data at more than one time point. AIMS: To compare psychosocial well-being among hospital clinicians at two different time points during the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020. METHODS: Participants included doctors, nurses, midwives and allied health clinicians at a multi-site, public health service in Melbourne, Australia. Data were collected via two cross-sectional, online surveys: May to June (wave 1; n = 638) and October to December 2020 (wave 2; n = 358). The Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21) assessed psychological well-being in the past week. Investigator-devised questions assessed COVID-19 concerns and perceived work impacts. General linear models were used to assess impact of wave on psychological distress. RESULTS: There were no significant demographic differences between the two groups. Both positive (e.g. learning experience) and negative (e.g. risk of getting COVID-19) impacts were reported. In both waves, staff were most concerned about health risks to family members. Wave 2 respondents were significantly more likely than wave 1 respondents to indicate concerns about colleagues having COVID-19, increased workloads, leave cancellation and increased conflict at work (all P < 0.001). Adjusting for sex, age, self-rated health and discipline group, depression, anxiety and stress scores were significantly higher for respondents in the second than the first wave (all P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Psychological well-being of hospital clinicians was significantly worse during the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic than the first. Sustained occupational and psychosocial support is recommended even when immediate COVID-19 concerns and impacts resolve.
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    "I Give It Everything for an Hour Then I Sleep for Four." The Experience of Post-stroke Fatigue During Outpatient Rehabilitation Including the Perspectives of Carers: A Qualitative Study.
    Bicknell, ED ; Said, CM ; Haines, KJ ; Kuys, S (Frontiers Media SA, 2022)
    Background: Fatigue is a debilitating post-stroke symptom negatively impacting rehabilitation. Lack of acknowledgment from carers can be additionally distressing. The purpose of this study was to describe the experience of post-stroke fatigue during outpatient rehabilitation, including the perspectives of carers. Methods: This qualitative study was guided by descriptive phenomenology within a constructivist paradigm. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with stroke survivors experiencing fatigue (Fatigue Assessment Scale >23) and attending outpatient rehabilitation. Carers were also interviewed where identified, providing insight into their own and stroke survivor experiences. Data were analyzed according to Colaizzi's analytic method. Results: Fourteen stroke survivors (50% culturally and linguistically diverse), and nine carers participated. Six themes were identified: 1. The unpredictable and unprepared uncovering of fatigue; 2. Experience and adjustment are personal 3. Being responsible for self-managing fatigue; 4. The complex juggle of outpatient stroke rehabilitation with fatigue; 5. Learning about fatigue is a self-directed problem-solving experience; 6. Family and carers can support or constrain managing fatigue. Conclusion: Despite engaging in outpatient rehabilitation, stroke survivors largely learnt to manage fatigue independent of healthcare professionals. Carers often facilitated learning, monitoring rehabilitation, daily routines and fatigue exacerbation. Conversely, family could be dismissive of fatigue and possess unrealistic expectations. Post-stroke fatigue must be considered by clinicians when delivering outpatient rehabilitation to stroke survivors. Clinicians should consistently screen for fatigue, provide flexible session scheduling, and educate about individual indicators and strategies for management. Clinicians should also explicitly engage carers who play a critical role in the management of fatigue.
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    A comparison of psychological characteristics in people with knee osteoarthritis from Japan and Australia: A cross-sectional study.
    Uritani, D ; Campbell, PK ; Metcalf, B ; Egerton, T ; Tan, MP (Public Library of Science (PLoS), 2022)
    The aim of this study was to investigate differences in psychological characteristics between people with knee osteoarthritis (OA) from Japan and Australia. Sixty-two adults from Japan and 168 adults from Australia aged over 50 years with knee pain were included. Japanese data were collected from patients with knee OA diagnosed by medical doctors. Australian data were baseline data from a randomized controlled trial. Participants were not exercising regularly or receiving physiotherapy at the time. Psychological characteristics evaluated were depressive symptoms, fear of movement, and pain catastrophizing. These psychological characteristics were compared between the Japanese and Australian cohorts by calculating 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for difference of the mean. To test for equivalence, an equivalence margin was set at 0.5 standard deviations (SD) of the mean, where these SDs were based on the Australian data. When the 95%CI for the difference of the mean value lay entirely within the range of equivalence margin (i.e. between -0.5 and 0.5 times the Australian SD), the outcome was considered equivalent. There were no differences between the groups from Japan and Australia for depressive symptoms and the two groups were considered equivalent. There was no difference between groups for fear of movement, however the criteria for equivalence was not met. People from Japan with knee OA had higher scores for pain catastrophizing than people from Australia. The findings should be confirmed in other samples of people with knee OA from Japan and Australia due to the limitations of the participant recruitment strategy in this study. However, our findings suggest there may be a greater need to consider pain catastrophizing and build pain self-efficacy when managing Japanese people with knee OA. Implementation of international clinical practice guidelines for OA management may require different strategies in different countries due to different psychological profiles.
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    A Cancer Exercise Toolkit Developed Using Co-Design: Mixed Methods Study.
    Dennett, AM ; Tang, CY ; Chiu, A ; Osadnik, C ; Granger, CL ; Taylor, NF ; Campbell, KL ; Barton, C (JMIR Publications Inc., 2022-04-21)
    BACKGROUND: Access to exercise therapy for cancer survivors is poor. Professional development to support exercise professionals in delivering these interventions is needed. Few online resources exist for exercise professionals to address this issue. OBJECTIVE: To develop and evaluate a freely available online toolkit to support exercise professionals working with cancer survivors. METHODS: A 2-phase, experience-based co-design approach was used to develop and evaluate the online toolkit. The two phases were as follows: 1) needs identification and co-design of resources and platform and 2) pilot evaluation. Four co-design workshops were conducted, transcribed, and thematically analyzed to identify key elements for the toolkit. For the pilot evaluation, a customized survey (the Determinants of Implementation Behavior Questionnaire) was distributed to exercise professionals at baseline and 3 months after launch of the online toolkit to determine its usability, utility, and effectiveness in improving their knowledge, confidence, and behavior. Results were reported as the median and interquartile range and changes were calculated using non-parametric tests. Website analytics described site usage after the initial evaluation. RESULTS: Twenty-five exercise professionals participated in co-designing 8 key elements of the online Cancer Exercise Toolkit: the homepage and pages for getting started, screening and safety, assessment, exercise prescription, education, locations, and resources. For the pilot evaluation, 277/320 respondents (87% of whom were physiotherapists) from 26 countries completed the survey at baseline, with 58 exercise professionals completing follow-up surveys at 3 months. Exercise professionals' knowledge, skills, and confidence in delivering exercise therapy to cancer survivors increased 3 months after baseline (items 1, 6, and 8: median score 5, IQR 3 to 6) to follow-up (items 1 and 6: median score 6, IQR 5 to 6; item 8: median score 5, IQR 5 to 7; P<.001) on a 1 to 7 Likert scale. Most participants (35/44, 80%) agreed or strongly agreed they would recommend the toolkit to colleagues. In the 6 months following the pilot evaluation, the toolkit received an average of 866 views per month. CONCLUSIONS: The co-designed online Cancer Exercise Toolkit was a useful resource for exercise professionals that may increase their knowledge, skills, and confidence in providing exercise therapy to cancer survivors.
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    An international core capability framework for physiotherapists delivering telephone-based care.
    Davies, L ; Hinman, RS ; Russell, T ; Lawford, B ; Bennell, K (Elsevier BV, 2022-04)
    QUESTION: What are the core capabilities that physiotherapists need in order to deliver quality telephone-based care? DESIGN: Three-round modified e-Delphi survey. PARTICIPANTS: An international Delphi panel comprising experts in the field, including consumers, physiotherapy researchers, physiotherapy clinicians and representatives of physiotherapy organisations. METHODS: A modified e-Delphi survey was conducted. A draft framework was adapted from a previously developed core capability framework for physiotherapists delivering care via videoconferencing. The panel considered the draft framework of 39 individual capabilities across six domains. Over three rounds, panellists rated their agreement (via Likert or 0-to-10 numerical rating scales) on whether each capability was essential (core) for physiotherapists to deliver telephone-based care. Capabilities achieving consensus, defined as 75% of the panel rating the item at least 7 out of 10 in Round 3, were retained. RESULTS: Seventy-one panellists from 17 countries participated in Round 1, with retention of 89% in Round 2 and 82% in Round 3. The final framework comprised 44 capabilities across six domains: compliance (n = 7 capabilities); patient privacy and confidentiality (n = 4); patient safety (n = 7); telehealth delivery (n = 9); assessment and diagnosis (n = 7); and care planning and management (n = 10). CONCLUSION: This framework outlines the core capabilities that physiotherapists need to provide telephone-based care. It can help inform content of physiotherapy curricula and professional development initiatives in telehealth delivery and provide guidance for physiotherapists providing care over the telephone.
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    Improving musculoskeletal injury surveillance methods in Special Operation Forces: A Delphi consensus study
    Stannard, J ; Finch, CF ; Fortington, LV ; Bachynski, K (Public Library of Science (PLoS), 2022-01-20)
    Musculoskeletal injury mitigation is a priority in military organisations to protect personnel health and sustain a capable workforce. Despite efforts to prevent injury, inconsistencies exist in the evidence used to support these activities. There are many known limitations in the injury surveillance data reported in previous Special Operation Forces (SOF) research. Such studies often lack accurate, reliable, and complete data to inform and evaluate injury prevention activities. This research aimed to achieve expert consensus on injury surveillance methods in SOF to enhance the quality of data that could be used to inform injury prevention in this population. A Delphi study was conducted with various military injury surveillance stakeholders to seek agreement on improving surveillance methods in SOF. Iterative questionnaires using close and open-ended questions were used to collect views about surveillance methods related to injury case definitions and identifying essential and optional data requirements. Consensus was predefined as 75% group agreement on an item. Sixteen participants completed two rounds of questionnaires required. Consensus was achieved for 17.9% (n = 7) of questions in the first-round and 77.5% (n = 38) of round two questions. Several challenges for surveillance were identified, including recording injury causation, SOF personnel’s injury reporting behaviours influencing accurate data collection, and surveillance system infrastructure limitations. Key military injury surveillance stakeholders support the need for improved data collection to enhance the evidence that underpins injury prevention efforts. The consensus process has resulted in preliminary recommendations to support future SOF injury surveillance.
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    Feasibility of personalised hip load modification using real-time biofeedback in hip osteoarthritis: A pilot study
    Diamond, LE ; Devaprakash, D ; Cornish, B ; Plinsinga, ML ; Hams, A ; Hall, M ; Hinman, RS ; Pizzolato, C ; Saxby, DJ (Elsevier BV, 2022-03)
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    Physiotherapy management for COVID-19 in the acute hospital setting and beyond: an update to clinical practice recommendations
    Thomas, P ; Baldwin, C ; Beach, L ; Bissett, B ; Boden, I ; Cruz, SM ; Gosselink, R ; Granger, CL ; Hodgson, C ; Holland, AE ; Jones, AY ; Kho, ME ; van der Lee, L ; Moses, R ; Ntoumenopoulos, G ; Parry, SM ; Patman, S (AUSTRALIAN PHYSIOTHERAPY ASSOC, 2022-01-01)
    This document provides an update to the recommendations for physiotherapy management for adults with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the acute hospital setting. It includes: physiotherapy workforce planning and preparation; a screening tool for determining requirement for physiotherapy; and recommendations for the use of physiotherapy treatments and personal protective equipment. New advice and recommendations are provided on: workload management; staff health, including vaccination; providing clinical education; personal protective equipment; interventions, including awake proning, mobilisation and rehabilitation in patients with hypoxaemia. Additionally, recommendations for recovery after COVID-19 have been added, including roles that physiotherapy can offer in the management of post-COVID syndrome. The updated guidelines are intended for use by physiotherapists and other relevant stakeholders caring for adult patients with confirmed or suspected COVID-19 in the acute care setting and beyond.