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    Civil Society: Past, Present, and Future
    Ogawa, A ; Kingston, J (Routledge, 2019)
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    Civil Society and Reconciliation: Rethinking History to Embrace Memory – Voices from Post-war Japan, Germany, and Italy
    Astarita, C ; Ogawa, A ; Aihara, H (Walking Fish Productions, 2019)
    Lasting reconciliation with former enemies after a war is a difficult and often distressful process. Peace is not a top-down practice and the entire civil society must be involved to make it successful. Official apologies have often been perceived as a symbolic yet effective tool to promote peace and reconciliation, and international regimes are often quoted as the optimal structure to consolidate stability. This documentary untangles the connections between formal apology, regime building and peace in post-war contexts, illustrating the critical role of media and civil society in influencing collective memory and fostering reconciliation. The case studies of Japan, Germany and Italy provide empirical evidence on how media critically shaped the narration of post-Second World War events and how this interpretation is instrumentally linked to the rhetoric on peace and stability. Interviews and archival research are used to elaborate on new cognitive frameworks and paradigms to transform media, and in particular new media, into powerful tools to spread new values and perspectives, embedding civil society in a virtuous reconciliation process.
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    Security Paradigms and Social Movements: The Changing Nature of Japanese Peace Activism
    Ogawa, A (Brill Academic Publishers, 2018)
    In 2014, Japan’s cabinet approved a significant change to national security policy. Previously barred from using military force, except in cases of self-defence, a constitutional reinterpretation by the cabinet allowed “collective self-defence”—using force to defend itself and its allies. The decision was controversial, considering post-war pacifism is firmly entrenched in Japanese national identity. I analyse how national security has been portrayed in the policymaking process for reinterpreting the Constitution. Meanwhile, since the early 2010s, Japanese society has been rocked by demonstrations opposing this. I explore the rise of a new youth activist movement in response to the proposed legislation. In particular, I argue that new ideologies and strategies appealed to young people in the organising of various protests, focusing on how they interpret the national security discourse and locating these social movements in Japanese postwar peace activism.
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    「アクションリサーチ」の実践現場から—持続可能な学びへの挑戦
    Ogawa, A ; Miyazaki, S ; Higuchi, K (オセアニア出版, 2018)
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    A Fulfilling Case of Action Research in Japan
    Ogawa, A ; Hülsen-Esch, AV ; Seidler, M ; Tagsold, C (Transcript Verlag, 2014)
    In der Alter(n)sforschung ist nicht zuletzt vor dem Hintergrund der demographischen Entwicklung ein Anstieg der Forschungsbeiträge und ein breites Spektrum an Forschungsansätzen zu beobachten. Dabei tritt in den jüngsten disziplinübergreifenden Publikationen die Annahme hervor, dass die gesellschaftlichen Probleme von Seiten der Wissenschaft am besten mithilfe einer inter- und transdisziplinären Vorgehensweise in Angriff zu nehmen seien. Entgegen diesem Trend fragt der Band dezidiert nach der methodischen Ausrichtung der einzelnen Disziplinen und konturiert damit die Ausgangsbasis für eine fachübergreifende Zusammenarbeit.
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    Demanding a safer tomorrow: Japan’s anti-nuclear rallies in the summer of 2012 (Respond to this article at http://www. therai. org. uk/at/debate)
    Ogawa, A (Wiley Online Library, 2013)
    Should Japan continue to generate nuclear power? This was a question raised multiple times during the summer of 2012, almost a year and a half after the great earthquake and the start of the radiation leak from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant. At that time, one of the major issues faced by Japanese politicians was how to deal with the government’s energy policy. Nuclear production has significantly contributed to furthering Japan’s economic prosperity: over the past 50 years, Japan has developed the third largest commercial nuclear programme in the world, exceeded only by the United States and France. Before Fukushima, nearly 30 percent of Japan’s electricity was provided by nuclear power, generated by its 54 nuclear reactors. With another 14 nuclear plants in the pipeline, Japan would have succeeded in meeting over half of the country’s energy demands through nuclear power by 2030 under Japan’s Basic Energy Plan, which was revised by the national government in June 2010.
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    Routledge Handbook of Civil Society in Asia
    Ogawa, A (Routledge, 2018-01-01)
    The Routledge Handbook of Civil Society in Asia is an interdisciplinary resource, covering one of the most dynamically expanding sectors in contemporary Asia.
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    Introduction: Routledge Handbook of Civil Society in Asia
    Ogawa, A ; Ogawa, A (Routledge, 2018-01-01)