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    Understanding the racialised and gendered experiences of Asian women working in aged care in Australia
    Winarnita, M ; Leone, C (Asia Institute, University of Melbourne, 2023)
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    Chronomobility of international students under COVID-19 Australia
    Dhanji, SD ; Ohashi, J ; Song, J (FRONTIERS MEDIA SA, 2023-12-08)
    This article investigates the chronomobility of international students in Australia going through COVID-19. Existing literature on international students approaches them largely in two manners: a market or victims. Using Shanti Robertson's chronomobility, the study focuses on international students' coping mechanisms and strategies for their next moves. Drawing from 15 in-depth interviews with international students formally enrolled in Australian institutions in Melbourne, the longest lockdown city during the pandemic, the authors find various ways of short-term coping mechanisms through meditation, physical exercises, virtual escapism and counselling. Furthermore, despite pandemic immobility, students presented a high level of resilience in making future decisions for post-pandemic mobilities. We conclude that family support and social networks are key to realise full potentials of international students as skilled migrants and valued members of society. Our manuscript contributes to the field of migration and mobility by enriching Robertson's concept of chrono-mobility and adding the empirical case study from international students in Australia during the latest pandemic in 2020-2021.
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    Global Arabic Studies: Lessons from a Transnational Asian Heritage
    Makhlouf, T (Asia Institute, University of Melbourne, )
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    Language shift and maintenance in the Korean community in Australia
    Shin, S-C ; Jung, SJ (International Journal of Korean Language Education, 2016)
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    İSLAMİ MİKROFİNANS ARAŞTIRMALARINDA MEVCUT TARTIŞMALAR VE GELECEK GÜNDEMLER: SCOPUS VERİTABANINA DAYALI BİR BİBLİYOMETRİK ÇALIŞMA
    TAHİR, M ; WASİM, MH ; QADRİ, HMUD ; FURQAN, M ; JAFAR, A ; ALİ, H (Istanbul Sabahattin Zaim University, )
    The main purpose of this study is to encapsulate the major themes and their inter-linkage within Islamic microfinance research and to highlight the important gaps by recommending future research areas of worth investigation. The Scopus database is used for this bibliometric analysis. Using a robust selection criterion, 89 research articles were finalized to conduct the analysis. For the visualization and presentation of results, various software were used, such as R, RStudio, VOSviewer, and Microsoft excel. Results of content analysis and literature mapping show that most of the available studies on Islamic microfinance are theoretical and cover the topics of Islamic microfinance models, importance as a tool for poverty alleviation, and integration of Islamic commercial and social finance. There is an ample research gap in this area, and there are various avenues that could be explored in future research. In comparison with other studies on the same area using the same methodology, this study presents the various research agendas, areas and ideas for future research, which makes this study a good contribution to the literature.
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    Some Interpretations
    Reuter, T (Joshua Nash, 2023)
    Debates on representational bias in the discipline of anthropology have focused on partialities arising from the subjectivity of individual researchers and from specific historical patterns of unequal relations between the societies in which ethnographers live and those they study. There are thus two layers to this debate, with bias operating both at an individual and a collective level. In the first case, biased representations of other ethnic groups and their cultures can arise from the personal subjectivity of individual researchers. In the second, ethnography is compromised as a collective enterprise by unequal historical and contemporary power relations between the societies concerned. An associated legitimisation crisis still lingers because a satisfying solution to the two sides of the subjectivity problem continues to elude us.
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    Imagination, Science and Education: How to liberate ourselves from the prison of rationality
    Reuter, T (Risk Institute, Trieste- Geneva, 2023)
    Achieving Human Security For All (HS4A) is a process that depends on our ability to imagine a future state that is different to present conditions, under which HS4A remains elusive. Only a very few eminent thinkers have recognised, however, that imagination is its own unique and important noetic or cognitive function independent of rationality, giving us access to an ontological sphere that otherwise remains closed to us. Meanwhile, for rationalist science philosophy, which has dominated our education systems since the Enlightenment period, imagination has long been understood as nothing but a preoccupation with the unreal, the mythic, the marvellous, the fictive, and fanciful—entertaining perhaps, but of no serious consequence. In this paper, I argue that rationalist modernism, along with a mass education system designed in keeping with this modernist ‘spirit of the times’, has led to our collective imprisonment within the real, the concrete, and robbed us of the capacity to reflect and transform ourselves and our relationship to the world and each other. This state of affairs will ensure humanity’s rapid demise given the mounting security challenges we now face, that is, unless we can reinstate the faculty of imagination within scientific epistemology and in education, and thus escape our entrapment.
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    Why Social Justice is the Most Effective Means of Disaster Impact Mitigation: Lessons from the Pandemic
    Reuter, T (Department of Ethnology and Anthropology, Faculty of Philosophy, University of Belgrade, 2023)
    The COVID-19 pandemic has shown that the impact of a systemic crisis depends very much on the prevailing level of inequality in the society concerned. This paper shows how the affordability of food was reduced dramatically for millions of people due to income loss in the wake of the pandemic, and the consequences this had. An analysis of the political economy of crisis then illustrates how economic inequality acts as a massive amplifier of disaster impacts on disadvantaged individuals and populations. Environmental degradation, across a broad spectrum from climate change to biodiversity loss, acts similarly as an impact amplifier in this and most other crises. Economically disadvantaged people are more immediately exposed to the impact of ecological degradation or may be forced to disregard the need for nature protection, which means the two factors are also mutually reinforcing. Inequality literally kills people, the more so in this century of worsening multidimensional crises. The paper argues that inequality on this scale is not just immoral but undermines human security, even for relatively privileged population groups, as well as threatening the stability of international relations. Addressing inequality, and especially inequitable policies in the food producing rural sector which acted as a major safety net for the poor during lockdowns, is thus the best pathway to mitigate future crises and their impact on food security.
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    Anthropological Perspectives on Covid-19
    Vučinić Nešković, V ; Reuter, T ; Patnaik, S (Faculty of Philosophy, University of Belgrade, Department of Ethnology and Anthropology, 2023)
    The Covid-19 pandemic has been a highly disruptive global crisis, touching nearly all aspects of human existence and changing many policy assumptions in transnational perspectives. Anthropologists witnessed these impacts first hand across many countries, while mainstream media reports focused primarily on the spread of the disease, public health measures and the impact on economic life in western countries. Other dimensions of the pandemic such as the emergence of new socialities and inequalities, social disarticulation, the changing role of fam-ily and kinship and the transformed domestic and professional spaces mediated through technology, especially in developing countries, were largely ignored.