Asia Institute - Research Publications

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    Policy transfer from the UN to ASEAN: the case of trafficking in persons
    Qiao, G ; Oishi, N (Taylor & Francis, 2019)
    This article examines the policy transfer from the United Nations (UN) to the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) in the case of trafficking in persons (TIP). It presents pioneering empirical research that analyzes the processes and mechanisms of policy transfer between the UN and a regional organization. Institutional collective action and regime complex theories in international relations are used to complement the existing state-centric policy transfer framework. We argue that the UN-ASEAN policy transfer in TIP is characterized by a two-step process, starting with transfer from the UN to the ASEAN member states, followed by synthesis at the regional level. The consensus-based decision-making approach in ASEAN restricts transfer outcomes to a common low base of national preferences, which is the lowest common denominator. The ability of stakeholders in the TIP field to steer lesson drawing, emulation and coercive transfer at both the national and regional levels allows them to influence the lowest common denominator. At the same time, policy transfer to ASEAN is shaped by “forum-shopping” by the ASEAN member states and other stakeholders within the TIP regime complex, based on the comparative advantage between ASEAN and other cooperation mechanisms in solving TIP-related issues.
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    Silent Exits: Risk and Post-3.11 Skilled Migration from Japan to Australia
    Oishi, N ; Hamada, I (OXFORD UNIV PRESS, 2019-12-01)
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    Redefining the "Highly Skilled": The Points-Based System for Highly Skilled Foreign Professionals in Japan
    Oishi, N (SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD, 2014-01-01)
    This article examines recent policy developments concerning highly skilled migration in Japan with a particular focus on the newly introduced points system. After numerous debates, the Japanese government introduced the points system in 2012 to attract more foreign professionals. The Japanese points system differs from those adopted in other countries in that it does not serve as an entry-screening mechanism. Rather, it aims to narrow down the definition of “highly skilled migrants” and promote their settlement by offering them more incentives and privileges. While this is one of the most significant reforms in the country's postwar immigration policies, the analysis suggests that the impact of the existing points system is likely to remain limited. This article identifies the limits of the points system and argues for more fundamental reforms in Japanese corporate practices, integration programs, institutional systems, and more fundamental actions against anti-migrant movements.
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    Global Talent on the Move: Multiple Migrations of Self-Initiated Expatriates in Asia
    OISHI, N ; Petray, P ; Stephens, A (The Australian Sociological Association, 2015-11-23)