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    Metaphorical Mappings of the ‘Eye’ in Chinese
    Luo, Y ; Qin, X ; Baş, M ; Kraska-Szlenk, I (Brill, 2022)
    Previous studies of body-part terms reveal that the eye as our organ of vision is a rich source domain for conceptualizing various aspects of the human mind. This chapter examines the semantic extensions of the body-part terms for ‘eyes’ and their metaphorical mappings in Chinese within the cognitive semantic framework. Linguistic evidence shows that ‘eyes’ are extensively employed in Chinese to conceptualize various human experiences which can be categorized roughly into four domains, i.e. knowledge/intellect, emotion and attitude, physical and social relationship, as well as shape and time. These metaphorical mappings are grounded on our bodily experience manifested through our interactive embodiment with the eyes. This study illustrates that while a large part of metaphorical mappings proceeds from the more concrete concepts to the more abstract concepts, there are cases where mappings overlap between concrete and abstract concepts. These findings seem to provide support for a more recent view of metaphorical mappings of the mental-as-the physical proposed by Sweetser.
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    Ordinary Laws and Extraordinary Crimes: Criminalising Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity in the Draft Criminal Code?
    Setiawan, K ; Lindsey, T ; Pausacker, H (Routledge, 2020)
    Every Thursday since 2007, survivors of human rights violations, their family members and representatives of human rights organisations gather in front of the Presidential Palace in Jakarta. After the end of authoritarianism in 1998, Indonesia witnessed many political and legal reforms. The failures of the Indonesian human rights system are perhaps best demonstrated by the fact that twenty years after the fall of authoritarianism, justice is yet to be delivered for crimes committed under the repressive regime of President Soeharto. Until legislative reform in the area of human rights took place after 1998, Indonesian law included very few provisions for the protection of human rights in general. Legal provisions criminalising serious human rights crimes were absent altogether. The proposed inclusion of gross human rights violations in the Draft Criminal Code has been mainly driven by a desire to fully codify Indonesian criminal law, rather than to improve the prosecution of serious human rights crimes.
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    Arbitrary Detention in Indonesia: Buru Island, 1969-1979
    Setiawan, K ; Cribb, R ; Twomey, C ; Wilson, S (Brill, 2022)
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    Remembering Suffering and Survival: Sites of Memory on Buru
    Setiawan, K ; McGregor, K ; Melvin, J ; Pohlman, A (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018)
    Survivors and their families have remembered the events of 1965 and the related suffering of persons targeted in the violence in complex ways. In the absence of state recognition of the suffering of victims of 1965, survivors and families have had to pass on their memories in personal ways making their own meanings of these sites of terror within families and communities of former political prisoners. This chapter considers this process in terms of memories of imprisonment on the remote eastern Indonesian island of Buru.
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    Empathy as embodied in medical interpreting: a case study of medical interpreter-trainees' turn-taking management
    Lan, N ; Leung, SM ; Moratto, R ; Defeng, L (Routledge, 2022)
    Despite the ever-increasing need for patient-centred, multilingual communication in the healthcare setting, research and practices in this field remain scarce. Little is known about the intricacies of empathic communication in an interpreter-mediated medical encounter. This chapter examines two video-recorded interpreter-mediated medical consultations in simulated scenarios that involve a doctor played by a medical professional, a patient played by an experienced interpreter, and a student-interpreter who interprets for the two parties consecutively. The focus is placed on the student-interpreter’s non-verbal cues in empathic communication. Results from this study show that student-interpreters’ empathy can be demonstrated through their management of turn-taking by non-verbal clues and highlights the importance of empathy for an enhanced interpreting performance. Based on the results, we argue that empathy is a much-needed communicative skill that should be included in medical interpreter training with an emphasis on the use of non-verbal devices.
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    Diversity of Indian Identity in Multicultural Melbourne
    Lakha, S ; Stevenson, M ; Dhanji, S ; Bilimoria, P ; Bapat, J ; Hughes, P (Manticore Press, 2019-02-17)
    This book covers the theory of diaspora, the historical development of the Indian communities in Australia since the late 19th century to the present times, current practices and statistical profiles of Hindus and Sikhs in Australia, and diasporic connections.
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    Meaning Matters: The Political Language of Islamic Populism
    Rakhmani, I ; Hadiz, V (Springer International Publishing, 2022)
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    Indonesia's “Third-wave” Democratic Model?
    Mudhoffir, AM ; Hadiz, VR (Routledge, 2021-11-17)
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    Nanotechnology in Food: Ethics, Industry Practices and Regulatory Frameworks
    Reuter, T ; Van de Voorde, M ; Jeswani, G (Walter de Gruyter GmbH, 2021)
    What are the ethical implications of nanomaterials in food systems, given the potential of such a material to cause harm to human health and the environment? Following an outline of relevant ethical principles, this chapter charts the current use of nanomaterials in food and what we do and do not know about the risks associated therewith. Regulatory frameworks are then examined for their ability to mitigate risks. Three recommendations are put forward. First, it is best to avoid all unnecessary food processing categorically; second, nano-processed food products should only enter the market when harmful impacts can be categorically ruled out on the basis of independent and in-depth research and where benefits are very significant; and finally, complete transparency on the use of nanomaterials and other additives is needed so that consumers can exercise individual discretion regarding their own exposure to nano-food products, even if they are safe, and the more so while any doubts remain about their safety. Overall, the trend of the largely profit-driven global food industry has been and is still toward hyper-processing - despite consistent warnings of health professions about hyper-processed food. Nanotech takes this trend to a new level. Current voluntary producer ethics do not even guarantee transparency, let alone safety, except in jurisdictions where legislation demands it. While some nanomaterials may be beneficial and safe for some applications, industry self-regulation is not viable under these circumstances. While regulations have been strengthened in some jurisdictions such as the European Union, regulators still struggle to catch up with the rapid development and application of ever-new nanotech products by the food industry. A restructure of our innovation systems is recommended so that all stakeholders are included in shaping its future direction from the start.
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    State of the Grain: Grain of the State: The Political - and Moral -Economy of Rice in Indonesia
    Macrae, G ; Reuter, T ; Dundon, A ; Vokes, R (Routledge, 2021)
    In so doing, the volume provides tools not only for understanding states’ responses to the COVID-19 pandemic, but also for judging what effects these responses are likely to have.