Architecture, Building and Planning - Research Publications

Permanent URI for this collection

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 118
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Embodied and Operational Energy of a Case Study Villa in UAE with Sensitivity Analysis
    Rauf, A ; Attoye, DE ; Crawford, R (MDPI, 2022-09-01)
    Extensive focus on operational energy research has positively impacted both academia and policymakers, facilitating new strategies that reduce the energy consumed by building occupants. Much less emphasis has, however, been given to embodied energy. Consequently, although studies now show that embodied energy can be responsible for up to 50% of a building’s life cycle energy, little is known about the embodied energy associated with the construction of buildings, materials, and components in the study context. The aim of this study is to investigate the current scenario in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) by calculating the embodied energy of a residential villa, and estimating the initial, recurrent, and demolition and disposal embodied energies over a 50-year building life span. A detailed assessment of the embodied energy associated with the construction of the case study villa was carried out using an input–output hybrid approach, followed by a sensitivity analysis focused on variations related to the energy associated and consumed, as well as the adoption of renewable energy sources. The findings show that the initial embodied energy was 57% of the life cycle embodied energy and 19% of the life cycle energy of the villa while the recurrent embodied energy was 43% of the life cycle embodied energy and 14% of the life cycle energy of the villa. The life cycle embodied energy of the villa, over a 50-year life span was 36% of the life cycle energy. This paper also highlights the impact of adding a solar PV system and lists multiple areas for future studies related to embodied energy and its benefit to stakeholders in the building industry.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    The lIfe cycle performance of Monomur in Australian residential construction
    Simcock, N ; Crawford, RH ; Jensen, CA (Green Building Council Spain, 2014)
    Brick veneer is the most dominant construction type in Australia; however it is not necessarily the most advantageous for the climate. Mass wall types, where massing is evident on the interior of the building, can help to achieve greater thermal performance. Monomur thermal blocks are a thermal mass system, based on single leaf construction. They are resistant to compression, transfer of heat, and are made from natural clay. Monomur has shown to benefit construction in Europe, most predominantly France, where the push for low energy buildings is high on the national agenda. This study aimed to determine the life cycle energy performance of the use of the monomur system in Australian residential construction. A life cycle energy analysis (LCEA) was used to quantify and compare the life cycle energy performance of two case study houses, one built from monomur and one from brick veneer. It was shown that there is minimal difference in the performance of these two construction approaches, paving the way for the potential use of monomur in the Australian context.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    An early-stage life cycle model for low-energy buildiings
    Crawford, RH ; Czerniakowski, I ; Fuller, RJ (Green Building Council Spain, 2014-10-30)
    The aim of this study is to demonstrate the application of a model previously developed by the authors for low-energy building design, to show how the availability of comparable energy performance information at the building design stage can be used to better optimise a building’s energy performance. The life cycle energy demand of a case study building was quantified using a comprehensive embodied energy assessment technique and TRNSYS thermal energy simulation software. The building was then modelled with variations to its external assemblies in an attempt to optimise its life cycle energy performance. The alternative assemblies chosen were those shown through the authors’ early-stage life cycle energy model to result in the lowest life cycle energy demand for each building element. The study showed that significant life cycle energy savings, up to 45%, are possible through the modelling of individual building elements for the case study building.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Building service life and its effect on the life cycle embodied energy of buildings
    Rauf, A ; Crawford, RH (Elsevier, 2015)
    The building sector is responsible for significant energy demands. An understanding of where this occurs across the building life cycle is critical for optimal targeting of energy reduction efforts. The energy embodied in a building can be significant, yet is not well understood, especially the on-going ‘recurrent’ embodied energy associated with material replacement and building refurbishment. A key factor affecting this ‘recurrent’ embodied energy is a building's service life. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the service life and the life cycle embodied energy of buildings. The embodied energy of a detached residential building was calculated for a building service life range of 1–150 years. The results show that variations in building service life can have a considerable effect on the life cycle embodied energy demand of a building. A 29% reduction in life cycle embodied energy was found for the case study building by extending its life from 50 to 150 years. This indicates the importance of including recurrent embodied energy in building life cycle energy analyses as well as integrating building service life considerations when designing and managing buildings for improved energy performance.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Concept and barriers for the economic value of low-energy houses
    Wu, H ; Crawford, RH ; Warren-Myers, G ; Dave, M ; Noguchi, M (Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors, 2015)
    This study explores the market revealed price of low-energy residential buildings and why the economic value of low-energy housing products is less transparent in active residential markets. It explores Australian and Japanese conditions and examines the proposition by using embodied energy, operational energy and market price data of selected housing stock in Australia. The study aims to examine a new perspective towards understanding the barriers to ascertaining the economic value of low-energy buildings. In particular, the study examines the composition of energy consumption associated with the residential property life cycle. Operational energy is linked to consumer preference by its inter-temporal value estimate of future expected utility or benefit flow. A ‘low’ embodied energy house is an environmental construct, which does not appear to currently link to short-term market value perception. It does not strongly link to an expected (intuitive) benefit. This ‘gap/disconnect’ creates a barrier to estimating a holistic economic value of low-energy residential property.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Exploring the relationship between Melbourne’s water metabolism and urban characteristics
    Athanassiadis, A ; Crawford, RH ; Bouillard, P ; Burton, P ; Shearer, H (State of Australian Cities Research Network, 2015)
    Cities can be seen as complex urban systems that mobilise local and global resource flows to meet the needs of their inhabitants and their manufacturing sector. However, the local consumption of resources can be responsible for major local and global environmental changes that impact the human health and wellbeing inside and outside of the boundary of the urban system. With global urban population expected to continue to grow, the mitigation of further future environmental pressures from urban consumption is of critical importance. The complexity of the interrelationships between the local social, political, cultural, economic and environmental facets of a city as well as the interrelationship between these local characteristics and urban consumption, dictate that each city will have a different set of parameters that drive urban consumption. This research will investigate this issue by exploring the relationship between Melbourne’s water metabolism and its urban characteristics. In practice, this study will correlate the spatially disaggregated water use of Melbourne with local factors such as demography, average income, territorial organisation, etc. It will then be possible to identify which urban characteristics have the greatest influence on water use and ultimately help to inform the development and implementation of the most appropriate and best targeted policies for reducing water use across Melbourne Metropolitan Area.
  • Item
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Investing in social housing during a pandemic
    Raynor, K ; Pert, A ; Bentley, R ; Crawford, R ; Wiesel, I ( 2020)
    Australia needs a National Housing Strategy, as well as consistent funding and policy mechanisms, to reverse our long-term declines in social housing.
  • Item
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Guest editorial: Smart villages, rural infrastructure and sustainable development
    Doloi, H ; Crawford, R ; Varghese, K (EMERALD GROUP PUBLISHING LTD, 2022-05-11)