Architecture, Building and Planning - Research Publications

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Now showing 1 - 10 of 26
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    The Hex
    Roudavski, S (40x40 Exhibition, 2017)
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    Ecological Games: Mould Racing
    Roudavski, S ; Holland, A ; Rutten, J (TRANSnational STS: Society for Social Studies of Science Annual Conference and Exhibition, 2018)
    This work contributes to architectural, urban and landscape design by constructing an analytical narrative of site exploration through a locative mobile game. This contribution is important because data- or precedent-driven analysis of complex sites is insufficient for the purposes of ecological design. Seeking to alleviate this situation, the project asks whether complex sites can be better understood through embodied and situated interactions with computational simulations. We hypothesize that such simulations can be useful for design because they can deepen designers’ understandings of the environment, encourage creative participation, and expand the repertoire of design methods.
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    Mould Racing
    Roudavski, S ; Holland, A ; Rutten, J (Mould Racing: Workshop 1, 2016)
    Can a complex site, such as an urban park, be better understood through a game? Might this playful preparation be useful for design? In response to such questions, this project structured design-oriented site research as a development, implementation and deployment of a locative mobile game in which designers learn by racing colonies of virtual organisms. The analysis of this experiment demonstrates that this approach can support creativity and provide benefits compatible with goals of ecological design.
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    Participatory Design in Pocket Pedal
    Roudavski, S ; Holland, A (TRANSnational STS: Society for Social Studies of Science Annual Conference and Exhibition, 2018)
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    Pocket Pedal
    Roudavski, S ; Holland, A (Participatory Design for Urban Cycling along St Kilda Road, design workshop, Open Stakeholder Workshop, 2016)
    A video giving an impression of a mobile phone game developed in support of participatory design, here in application to urban cycling
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    Place as Colour
    Roudavski, S ; Ward, W ; Burry, M ; Taylor, M ; Lee, V ; Malpas, J (Place and Paramericism Exhibition at Real/Material/Ethereal: The 2nd Annual Design Research Conference, 2019)
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    Trees as Places
    Roudavski, S ; Rutten, J ; Lee, V ; Burr, M ; Taylor, M ; Malpas, J (Place and Paramericism Exhibition at Real/Material/Ethereal: The 2nd Annual Design Research Conference, 2019)
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    Invisible Places
    Roudavski, S ; Lee, V ; Taylor, M ; Burry, M ; Malpas, J (Place and Paramericism Exhibition at Real/Material/Ethereal: The 2nd Annual Design Research Conference, 2019)
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    Sensing Place
    Roudavski, S ; Rutten, J ; Lee, V ; Burry, M ; Taylor, M ; Malpas, J (Place and Paramericism Exhibition at Real/Material/Ethereal: The 2nd Annual Design Research Conference, 2019)
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    Modelling Workflows for More-than-Human Design: Prosthetic Habitats for the Powerful Owl (Ninox strenua)
    Roudavski, S ; Parker, D ; Gengnagel, C ; Baverel, O ; Burry, J ; Thomsen, MR ; Weinzierl, S (Springer, 2019)
    Anthropogenic degradation of the environment is pervasive and expanding. Human construction activities destroy or damage habitats of nonhuman lifeforms. In many cases, artificial replacement habitats become necessary. However, designing for the needs and preferences of nonhuman lifeforms is challenging. Established workflows for this type of designing do not exist. This paper hypothesises that a multi-scale modelling approach can support inclusive, more-than-human design. The case-study project tests this approach by applying computational modelling to the design of prosthetic habitats for the powerful owl (Ninox strenua). The proposed approach simulates owls’ perception of the city based on scientific evidence. The tools include algorithmic mapping, 3D-scanning, generative modelling, digital fabrication and augmented-reality assembly. Outcomes establish techniques for urban-scale planning, site selection, tree-scale fitting, and nest-scale form-making. The findings demonstrate that computational modelling can (1) inform more-than-human design and (2) guide scientific data collection for more inclusive ecosystem management.