Architecture, Building and Planning - Research Publications

Permanent URI for this collection

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 14
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    A pilot study on users’ IEQ perceptions in a residential aged care facility in Melbourne
    Chau, H ; Aye, L ; Noguchi, M ; Newton, C ; Zhou, J ; Mei Min Woo, C ; Rajagopalan, P ; Andamon, M (RMIT, 2018-11-29)
    The aged population in Australia is expanding rapidly. To cater for the Australia’s ageing population, there is a significant increase in demand for aged care facilities over the coming decades. The indoor environmental quality (IEQ) affects users’ physical health and psychological wellbeing. However, systematic research on the relationship between users’ perceptions and IEQ of aged care facilities has yet to be developed. In this pilot study, a residential aged care facility in Melbourne was selected as a case study for investigating the differences between the measured IEQ data and the users’ perceived individual comfort. A questionnaire survey was conducted to collect the perceptions of users on IEQ. Environmental sensors which enable web-based data monitoring were deployed. The measured data were then analysed together with the questionnaire survey results for drawing a comparison with the users’ perceptions. It was found that the measurements by environmental sensors are realistic and the survey questionnaires are appropriate for the study. For the future surveys, the language barrier needs to be considered for non-English speakers.
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Trees provide energy saving benefits to adjacent buildings for a small water cost
    Livesley, SJ ; Aye, L ; Hes, D ; DAWKINS, A ; LHENDUP, T ; CAFFIN, M ; Williams, NS (Australian Sustainable Cities and Regions Network, 2011)
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Template schools: Measuring indoor environmental quality
    Crawford, RH ; Jensen, CA ; Chan, TK ; Hes, D ; Aye, L (The University of Sydney, 2011)
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    A modelling method to assess the effect of tree shading for building performance simulation
    Hes, D ; Dawkins, A ; Jensen, CA ; Aye, L (International Building Performance Simulation Association, 2011)
    Increasing urban tree numbers is a simple but effective means to provide climate change adaptation to the urban environment by reducing the thermal load on buildings. To better communicate and value the importance of urban trees it is necessary to quantify these benefits and to understand the properties and processes that influence the magnitude of these benefits. For this we need verified and effective ways of modelling the trees in modelling software. This paper presents the results and problems encountered when trying to model trees effectively. The aim is to present our approach which was to treat the shade as a shading co-efficient on the wall. This allows for the consideration of the benefits of deciduous versus evergreen species. A modelling method to assess the effect of tree shading was developed and presented in this paper.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    A holistic model for designing and optimising sustainable prefabricated modular buildings
    Gunawardena, DS ; Ngo, TD ; Mendis, PA ; Aye, L ; Crawford, RH ; Alfano, JA (University of Moratuwa, 2012)
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    INVESTIGATING POTENTIAL COMFORT BENEFITS OF BIOLOGICALLY-INSPIRED BUILDING SKINS
    Webb, M ; Aye, L ; Green, R ; Wurtz, E (INT BUILDING PERFORMANCE SIMULATION ASSOC-IBPSA, 2013-01-01)
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Sensitivity analysis of building envelope parameters affecting thermal comfort
    Naji, S ; Aye, L ; Noguchi, M (ZEMCH Network, 2018-01-29)
    The ever-increasing attention towards implementation of environmentally sustainable building design approaches necessitates the prediction of indoor environmental quality (IEQ) during design stage. Building performance simulation tools are able to predict key performance indices of buildings including IEQ. Among different aspects of IEQ, thermal comfort has been reported as one of the important aspects for occupants. It is necessary to understand the effects of design parameters on the performance of building in order to provide acceptable thermal comfort levels. However, due to the possibility of various design strategies, the selection of the most appropriate combination is a challenging task. Thus, the determination of effective parameters is of great importance in order to streamline the design process. The design parameters related to building envelope are among the most important items that have major influence on building thermal performance. Although prefabrication offers several benefits in terms of saving on-site time, saving money and better waste management, it affects envelope thermal performance due to introduction of lightweight components. While there is a body of research reporting the effects of passive strategies on building thermal performance, the influence of lightweight prefabricated envelope components is not well-documented in the current literature. This paper aims to perform a sensitivity analysis (SA) to identify the relative importance of major building envelope design parameters affecting thermal comfort of a prefabricated house in Melbourne, Australia. The envelope parameters investigated are: infiltration rate, solar heat gain coefficients and sizes of windows, and thermal resistance of insulation for exterior walls, floor and roof. The ranges of these parameters are based on the building components particularly used by prefabrication building industry in Australia. A typical three-bedroom prefabricated house in Melbourne was considered and the results of the SA are presented.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Exploring demands for mass customised prefabricated houses in Brazil
    Akemi Yokota, ; Aye, L ; Noguchi, M (ZEMCH Network, 2018-01-29)
    Housing shortage has been a challenge faced by many countries around the world. In Brazil, the housing supply capacity was less than demand by about 5.4 million dwellings in 2011. To address this shortfall, the Brazilian government launched ‘Programa Minha Casa Minha Vida’ (My House, My Life Program) in 2009 with the aim of reducing housing shortage. The program was divided into three development stages, the first and second stages of the program were completed in 2014 and 2016, respectively. The third stage is now ongoing, a grand total of 4.6 million dwellings are expected to be delivered at the completion by the end of 2018. However, there is significant lack of information on reliable housing demand and supply predictions for the coming years in Curitiba. In addition, the consumers’ feedback from first and second development stages showed that lack of choice and design customisability have been an issue. Therefore, quantifying housing demand in Curitiba is extremely important for planning purposes and better houses. Mass customised prefabricated houses have enormous potential to deliver high-quality in large scale with shorter time by providing options for the consumers. The aim of this study is to develop a housing demand model of mass customised houses for the city of Curitiba. The potential for future mass customisation in Curitiba is explored as the demand of various house sizes are predicted up to 2025. Based on the Brazilian Census data from 2010, population profiles and diversity of family’s structures are used as influencing parameters in the model. The outcome of the proposed model can be used as guideline or public policy for delivering appropriate mass customised houses which would fit future needs and desires of people. The predicted results show substantial reduction in size of the family living at the same dwelling, which will certainly impact on the future of the housing market. It was interpreted that there is a need of more compact one and two-bedroom dwellings, reducing the demand of four-bedroom dwellings.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Comparing mixing ventilation and displacement ventilation in university classrooms
    Zhou, J ; Chau, H-W ; Kang, Y ; Hes, D ; Noguchi, M ; Aye, L (ZEMCH Network, 2018-01-29)
    There are two main types of mechanical ventilation systems: the mixing ventilation (MV) and the displacement ventilation (DV). The aim of this work is to compare their performance in terms of ventilation efficiency, air temperature, relative humidity, size-resolved particle concentrations, carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, and energy consumption. We performed a field investigation in two side-by-side classrooms installed with the two different ventilation systems. The energy consumptions were measured by i) a heat meter to measure the energy extracted by chilled water supplied, and ii) a power analyser to measure energy consumed by the ventilation fan. We also monitor indoor air dry bulb temperature, relative humidity, and CO2 concentrations in real-time for both rooms. It was found that the classroom with DV system consumed more energy. The unexpected high energy consumption can be attributable to the improved ventilation, CO2 and humidity control in DV room. Air temperature stratification were observed in DV room, but both room achieved similar volume-averaged temperate. We also found lower particle concentrations in both rooms compared to outdoor levels.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Pilot study on IEQ of an aged-care facility in Victoria
    Chau, H-W ; Zhou, J ; Noguchi, M ; Hes, D ; Aye, L (ZEMCH Network, 2018-01-29)
    Australian population is ageing. The proportion of Australian population over 65 years old has been increased and it is projected to be 25% in 2042. Although the Victorian Government has promoted ageing in place under home care package services, there is still a genuine need to provide more residential aged care services to satisfy the needs. The indoor environmental quality (IEQ) of residential aged care facilities is closely related to the health and well-being of residents living there. In this pilot study, the Adare Supported Residential Services (SRS) in Victoria is selected as the site for investigation. Some sensors are deployed in both communal areas and residents’ rooms to collect transient data on IEQ parameters, including carbon dioxide concentration, dry bulb temperature, radiant temperature, relative humidity and illumination level. Data collected is analysed and the links between outdoor environmental conditions and IEQ parameters are investigated. Limitations of this pilot study are discussed and recommendations for the full study are provided.