Architecture, Building and Planning - Research Publications

Permanent URI for this collection

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 8 of 8
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Equitable local outcomes in adaptation to sea-level rise: year 2 project report 2012
    Barnett, Jon ; Fincher, Ruth ; HURLIMANN, ANNA ; Graham, Sonia ; MORTREUX, COLETTE (The University of Melbourne, 2012)
    This is the second year project report for Australian Research Council Linkage Project titled 'Equitable Outcomes in Adaptation to Sea Level Rise'.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    A snapshot of the lived values of Manns beach, McLoughlins beach and Robertsons beach: results from a mail-out survey
    Barnett, Jon ; Fincher, Ruth ; HURLIMANN, ANNA ; Graham, Sonia ; MORTREUX, COLETTE (The University of Melbourne, 2012)
    This report provides a summary of results from a mail-out survey regarding 'lived values' that was conducted in the Victorian towns of Manns Beach, McLoughlins Beach, Port Albert and Seaspray in mid 2012.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    A snapshot of the lived values of Port Albert: results from a mail-out survey
    Barnett, Jon ; Fincher, Ruth ; HURLIMANN, ANNA ; Graham, Sonia ; MORTREUX, COLETTE (The University of Melbourne, 2012)
    This report provides a summary of the findings of a mail-out survey regarding 'lived values' which was conducted in Port Albert in mid 2012.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    A snapshot of the lived values of Seaspray: results from a mail-out survey
    Barnett, Jon ; Fincher, Ruth ; HURLIMANN, ANNA ; Graham, Sonia ; MORTREUX, COLETTE (The University of Melbourne, 2012)
    This report presents an overview of the results from a mail-out survey that was conducted in the Victorian town of Seaspray in mid 2012, regarding 'lived values'.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    A snapshot of the lived values of Lakes Entrance: results from a phone survey
    Barnett, Jon ; Fincher, Ruth ; HURLIMANN, ANNA ; Graham, Sonia ; MORTREUX, COLETTE (The University of Melbourne, 2012)
    Provides a snapshot of results from a phone survey conducted with 199 Lakes Entrance households conducted in mid 2012 on the subject of 'lived values.'
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    The social values at risk from sea-level rise
    Graham, S ; Barnett, J ; Fincher, R ; Hurlimann, A ; Mortreux, C ; Waters, E (ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC, 2013-07-01)
    Analysis of the risks of sea-level rise favours conventionally measured metrics such as the area of land that may be subsumed, the numbers of properties at risk, and the capital values of assets at risk. Despite this, it is clear that there exist many less material but no less important values at risk from sea-level rise. This paper re-theorises these multifarious social values at risk from sea-level rise, by explaining their diverse nature, and grounding them in the everyday practices of people living in coastal places. It is informed by a review and analysis of research on social values from within the fields of social impact assessment, human geography, psychology, decision analysis, and climate change adaptation. From this we propose that it is the ‘lived values’ of coastal places that are most at risk from sea-level rise. We then offer a framework that groups these lived values into five types: those that are physiological in nature, and those that relate to issues of security, belonging, esteem, and self-actualisation. This framework of lived values at risk from sea-level rise can guide empirical research investigating the social impacts of sea-level rise, as well as the impacts of actions to adapt to sea-level rise. It also offers a basis for identifying the distribution of related social outcomes across populations exposed to sea-level rise or sea-level rise policies.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Incorporating community values into climate change planning: a guide for government
    BARNETT, JONATHON ; FINCHER, BEATRICE RUTH ; HURLIMANN, ANNA ; Graham, Sonia ; MORTREUX, COLETTE (The University of Melbourne, 2014-06)
    Planning for climate change is not easy. Not only is it difficult to predict the exact environmental changes that will occur at any particular place and time, it is also challenging to ensure that the diverse needs of the community continue to be met. This manual is intended for parties interested in achieving a just approach to adaptation. It provides a step-by-step guide of how to identify community values, relationships and activities that are likely to be impacted by climate change and adaptation, and how to implement a more equitable, fair and inclusive adaptation process. The overall approach is called a Values Approach for Adaptation Planning (VAAP). There are six main steps involved: 1. Gathering information on climate scenarios and vulnerability 2. Scope potential values at risk 3. Confirm actual values at risk 4. Develop a profile of residents and their values 5. Identify scenarios to guide adaptation planning 6. Encourage community participation in development of adaptation stages These six steps were developed and tested in five communities along the Gippsland East coast, Victoria—Lakes Entrance, Seaspray, Port Albert, McLoughlins Beach and Manns Beach. Throughout the manual examples from the project are used to show how each step can be conducted and the types of results that can be obtained. It is hoped that this manual will be used by communities and local governments in Australia, and internationally, to expand the current focus of decision-making from the impacts of climate changes on health and finances to the less tangible factors that gives meaning to people’s everyday lives.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Equitable local outcomes in adaptation to sea-level rise: final project report
    BARNETT, JONATHON ; FINCHER, BEATRICE RUTH ; HURLIMANN, ANNA ; Graham, Sonia ; MORTREUX, COLETTE (The University of Melbourne, 2014-06)
    This report details the outcomes of a 3.5 year Australian Research Council Linkage Grant (2010-2013) titled 'Equitable Outcomes in Adaptation to Sea-Level Rise'. The project was based in the Gippsland East area of the state of Victoria Australia. Project partners included The East Gippsland Shire Council, The Department of Environment and Primary Industries, The Department of Planning Transport and Local Infrastructure, The Gippsland Coastal Board and Wellington Shire Council. This project developed an approach for identifying the social outcomes of various strategies to adapt to sea-level rise, and trialed the concept of an ‘adaptation pathway’ that can help communities and governments to take steps to manage the risks of sea-level rise.