Melbourne Students & Learning - Research Publications

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    Explainer: Open access vs traditional academic journal publishers
    CRAMOND, W (The Conversation Media Group, 2011-07-27)
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    University of Melbourne Digital Preservation Strategy 2015-2025 - Vision Mandate and Principles
    Shadbolt, A ; Konstantelos, L ; McCarthy, G ; Dean, K ; O'Neil, O (University of Melbourne, 2013)
    University of Melbourne Digital Preservation Strategy 2015-2025 - Vision Mandate and Principles
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    Evaluation of chromosome 6p22 as a breast cancer risk modifier locus in a follow-up study of BRCA2 mutation carriers
    Stevens, KN ; Wang, X ; Fredericksen, Z ; Pankratz, VS ; Greene, MH ; Andrulis, IL ; Thomassen, M ; Caligo, M ; Nathanson, KL ; Jakubowska, A ; Osorio, A ; Hamann, U ; Godwin, AK ; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D ; Southey, M ; Buys, SS ; Singer, CF ; Hansen, TVO ; Arason, A ; Offit, K ; Piedmonte, M ; Montagna, M ; Imyanitov, E ; Tihomirova, L ; Sucheston, L ; Beattie, M ; Neuhausen, SL ; Szabo, CI ; Simard, J ; Spurdle, AB ; Healey, S ; Chen, X ; Rebbeck, TR ; Easton, DF ; Chenevix-Trench, G ; Antoniou, AC ; Couch, FJ (SPRINGER, 2012-11-01)
    Several common germline variants identified through genome-wide association studies of breast cancer risk in the general population have recently been shown to be associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 mutation carriers. When combined, these variants can identify marked differences in the absolute risk of developing breast cancer for mutation carriers, suggesting that additional modifier loci may further enhance individual risk assessment for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Recently, a common variant on 6p22 (rs9393597) was found to be associated with increased breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.55, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.25-1.92, p = 6.0 × 10(-5)]. This observation was based on data from GWAS studies in which, despite statistical correction for multiple comparisons, the possibility of false discovery remains a concern. Here, we report on an analysis of this variant in an additional 6,165 BRCA1 and 3,900 BRCA2 mutation carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). In this replication analysis, rs9393597 was not associated with breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR = 1.09, 95 % CI 0.96-1.24, p = 0.18). No association with ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers or with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers was observed. This follow-up study suggests that, contrary to our initial report, this variant is not associated with breast cancer risk among individuals with germline BRCA2 mutations.
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    11q13 is a susceptibility locus for hormone receptor positive breast cancer
    Lambrechts, D ; Truong, T ; Justenhoven, C ; Humphreys, MK ; Wang, J ; Hopper, JL ; Dite, GS ; Apicella, C ; Southey, MC ; Schmidt, MK ; Broeks, A ; Cornelissen, S ; van Hien, R ; Sawyer, E ; Tomlinson, I ; Kerin, M ; Miller, N ; Milne, RL ; Pilar Zamora, M ; Arias Perez, JI ; Benitez, J ; Hamann, U ; Ko, Y-D ; Bruening, T ; Chang-Claude, J ; Eilber, U ; Hein, R ; Nickels, S ; Flesch-Janys, D ; Wang-Gohrke, S ; John, EM ; Miron, A ; Winqvist, R ; Pylkas, K ; Jukkola-Vuorinen, A ; Grip, M ; Chenevix-Trench, G ; Beesley, J ; Chen, X ; Menegaux, F ; Cordina-Duverger, E ; Shen, C-Y ; Yu, J-C ; Wu, P-E ; Hou, M-F ; Andrulis, IL ; Selander, T ; Glendon, G ; Mulligan, AM ; Anton-Culver, H ; Ziogas, A ; Muir, KR ; Lophatananon, A ; Rattanamongkongul, S ; Puttawibul, P ; Jones, M ; Orr, N ; Ashworth, A ; Swerdlow, A ; Severi, G ; Baglietto, L ; Giles, G ; Southey, M ; Marme, F ; Schneeweiss, A ; Sohn, C ; Burwinkel, B ; Yesilyurt, BT ; Neven, P ; Paridaens, R ; Wildiers, H ; Brenner, H ; Mueller, H ; Arndt, V ; Stegmaier, C ; Meindl, A ; Schott, S ; Bartram, CR ; Schmutzler, RK ; Cox, A ; Brock, IW ; Elliott, G ; Cross, SS ; Fasching, PA ; Schulz-Wendtland, R ; Ekici, AB ; Beckmann, MW ; Fletcher, O ; Johnson, N ; Silva, IDS ; Peto, J ; Nevanlinna, H ; Muranen, TA ; Aittomaki, K ; Blomqvist, C ; Doerk, T ; Schuermann, P ; Bremer, M ; Hillemanns, P ; Bogdanova, NV ; Antonenkova, NN ; Rogov, YI ; Karstens, JH ; Khusnutdinova, E ; Bermisheva, M ; Prokofieva, D ; Gancev, S ; Jakubowska, A ; Lubinski, J ; Jaworska, K ; Durda, K ; Nordestgaard, BG ; Bojesen, SE ; Lanng, C ; Mannermaa, A ; Kataja, V ; Kosma, V-M ; Hartikainen, JM ; Radice, P ; Peterlongo, P ; Manoukian, S ; Bernard, L ; Couch, FJ ; Olson, JE ; Wang, X ; Fredericksen, Z ; Alnaes, GG ; Kristensen, V ; Borresen-Dale, A-L ; Devilee, P ; Tollenaar, RAEM ; Seynaeve, CM ; Hooning, MJ ; Garcia-Closas, M ; Chanock, SJ ; Lissowska, J ; Sherman, ME ; Hall, P ; Liu, J ; Czene, K ; Kang, D ; Yoo, K-Y ; Noh, D-Y ; Lindblom, A ; Margolin, S ; Dunning, AM ; Pharoah, PDP ; Easton, DF ; Guenel, P ; Brauch, H (WILEY, 2012-07-01)
    A recent two-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified five novel breast cancer susceptibility loci on chromosomes 9, 10, and 11. To provide more reliable estimates of the relative risk associated with these loci and investigate possible heterogeneity by subtype of breast cancer, we genotyped the variants rs2380205, rs1011970, rs704010, rs614367, and rs10995190 in 39 studies from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC), involving 49,608 cases and 48,772 controls of predominantly European ancestry. Four of the variants showed clear evidence of association (P ≤ 3 × 10(-9) ) and weak evidence was observed for rs2380205 (P = 0.06). The strongest evidence was obtained for rs614367, located on 11q13 (per-allele odds ratio 1.21, P = 4 × 10(-39) ). The association for rs614367 was specific to estrogen receptor (ER)-positive disease and strongest for ER plus progesterone receptor (PR)-positive breast cancer, whereas the associations for the other three loci did not differ by tumor subtype.
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    Diagnostic Chest X-Rays and Breast Cancer Risk before Age 50 Years for BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers
    John, EM ; McGuire, V ; Thomas, D ; Haile, R ; Ozcelik, H ; Milne, RL ; Felberg, A ; West, DW ; Miron, A ; Knight, JA ; Terry, MB ; Daly, M ; Buys, SS ; Andrulis, IL ; Hopper, JL ; Southey, MC ; Giles, GG ; Apicella, C ; Thorne, H ; Whittemore, AS (AMER ASSOC CANCER RESEARCH, 2013-09-01)
    BACKGROUND: The effects of low-dose medical radiation on breast cancer risk are uncertain, and few studies have included genetically susceptible women, such as those who carry germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. METHODS: We studied 454 BRCA1 and 273 BRCA2 mutation carriers ages younger than 50 years from three breast cancer family registries in the United States, Canada, and Australia/New Zealand. We estimated breast cancer risk associated with diagnostic chest X-rays by comparing mutation carriers with breast cancer (cases) with those without breast cancer (controls). Exposure to chest X-rays was self-reported. Mammograms were not considered in the analysis. RESULTS: After adjusting for known risk factors for breast cancer, the ORs for a history of diagnostic chest X-rays, excluding those for tuberculosis or pneumonia, were 1.16 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.64-2.11] for BRCA1 mutations carriers and 1.22 (95% CI, 0.62-2.42) for BRCA2 mutations carriers. The OR was statistically elevated for BRCA2 mutation carriers with three to five diagnostic chest X-rays (P = 0.01) but not for those with six or more chest X-rays. Few women reported chest fluoroscopy for tuberculosis or chest X-rays for pneumonia; the OR estimates were elevated, but not statistically significant, for BRCA1 mutation carriers. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings do not support a positive association between diagnostic chest X-rays and breast cancer risk before the ages of 50 years for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. IMPACT: Given the increasing use of diagnostic imaging involving higher ionizing radiation doses, further studies of genetically predisposed women are warranted.
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    The mTORC1 Inhibitor Everolimus Prevents and Treats E mu-Myc Lymphoma by Restoring Oncogene-Induced Senescence
    Wall, M ; Poortinga, G ; Stanley, KL ; Lindemann, RK ; Bots, M ; Chan, CJ ; Bywater, MJ ; Kinross, KM ; Astle, MV ; Waldeck, K ; Hannan, KM ; Shortt, J ; Smyth, MJ ; Lowe, SW ; Hannan, RD ; Pearson, RB ; Johnstone, RW ; McArthur, GA (AMER ASSOC CANCER RESEARCH, 2013-01-01)
    UNLABELLED: MYC deregulation is common in human cancer. IG-MYC translocations that are modeled in Eμ-Myc mice occur in almost all cases of Burkitt lymphoma as well as in other B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. Deregulated expression of MYC results in increased mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling. As tumors with mTORC1 activation are sensitive to mTORC1 inhibition, we used everolimus, a potent and specific mTORC1 inhibitor, to test the requirement for mTORC1 in the initiation and maintenance of Eμ-Myc lymphoma. Everolimus selectively cleared premalignant B cells from the bone marrow and spleen, restored a normal pattern of B-cell differentiation, and strongly protected against lymphoma development. Established Eμ-Myc lymphoma also regressed after everolimus therapy. Therapeutic response correlated with a cellular senescence phenotype and induction of p53 activity. Therefore, mTORC1-dependent evasion of senescence is critical for cellular transformation and tumor maintenance by MYC in B lymphocytes. SIGNIFICANCE: This work provides novel insights into the requirements for MYC-induced oncogenesis by showing that mTORC1 activity is necessary to bypass senescence during transformation of B lymphocytes. Furthermore, tumor eradication through senescence elicited by targeted inhibition of mTORC1 identifies a previously uncharacterized mechanism responsible for significant anticancer activity of rapamycin analogues and serves as proof-of-concept that senescence can be harnessed for therapeutic benefit
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    9q31.2-rs865686 as a Susceptibility Locus for Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer: Evidence from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium
    Warren, H ; Dudbridge, F ; Fletcher, O ; Orr, N ; Johnson, N ; Hopper, JL ; Apicella, C ; Southey, MC ; Mahmoodi, M ; Schmidt, MK ; Broeks, A ; Cornelissen, S ; Braaf, LM ; Muir, KR ; Lophatananon, A ; Chaiwerawattana, A ; Wiangnon, S ; Fasching, PA ; Beckmann, MW ; Ekici, AB ; Schulz-Wendtland, R ; Sawyer, EJ ; Tomlinson, I ; Kerin, M ; Burwinkel, B ; Marme, F ; Schneeweiss, A ; Sohn, C ; Guenel, P ; Therese, T ; Laurent-Puig, P ; Mulot, C ; Bojesen, SE ; Nielsen, SF ; Flyger, H ; Nordestgaard, BG ; Milne, RL ; Benitez, J ; Arias-Perez, J-I ; Pilar Zamora, M ; Anton-Culver, H ; Ziogas, A ; Bernstein, L ; Dur, CC ; Brenner, H ; Mueller, H ; Arndt, V ; Langheinz, A ; Meindl, A ; Golatta, M ; Bartram, CR ; Schmutzler, RK ; Brauch, H ; Justenhoven, C ; Bruening, T ; Chang-Claude, J ; Wang-Gohrke, S ; Eilber, U ; Doerk, T ; Schuermann, P ; Bremer, M ; Hillemanns, P ; Nevanlinna, H ; Muranen, TA ; Aittomaki, K ; Blomqvist, C ; Bogdanova, N ; Antonenkova, N ; Rogov, Y ; Bermisheva, M ; Prokofyeva, D ; Zinnatullina, G ; Khusnutdinova, E ; Lindblom, A ; Margolin, S ; Mannermaa, A ; Kosma, V-M ; Hartikainen, JM ; Kataja, V ; Chenevix-Trench, G ; Beesley, J ; Chen, X ; Lambrechts, D ; Smeets, A ; Paridaens, R ; Weltens, C ; Flesch-Janys, D ; Buck, K ; Behrens, S ; Peterlongo, P ; Bernard, L ; Manoukian, S ; Radice, P ; Couch, FJ ; Vachon, C ; Wang, X ; Olson, J ; Giles, G ; Baglietto, L ; McLean, CA ; Severi, G ; John, EM ; Miron, A ; Winqvist, R ; Pylkas, K ; Jukkola-Vuorinen, A ; Grip, M ; Andrulis, IL ; Knight, JA ; Mulligan, AM ; Weerasooriya, N ; Devilee, P ; Tollenaar, RAEM ; Martens, JWM ; Seynaeve, CM ; Hooning, MJ ; Hollestelle, A ; Jager, A ; Tilanus-Linthorst, MMA ; Hall, P ; Czene, K ; Liu, J ; Li, J ; Cox, A ; Cross, SS ; Brock, IW ; Reed, MWR ; Pharoah, P ; Blows, FM ; Dunning, AM ; Ghous-saini, M ; Ashworth, A ; Swerdlow, A ; Jones, M ; Schoemaker, M ; Easton, DF ; Humphreys, M ; Wang, Q ; Peto, J ; dos-Santos-Silva, I (AMER ASSOC CANCER RESEARCH, 2012-10-01)
    BACKGROUND: Our recent genome-wide association study identified a novel breast cancer susceptibility locus at 9q31.2 (rs865686). METHODS: To further investigate the rs865686-breast cancer association, we conducted a replication study within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, which comprises 37 case-control studies (48,394 cases, 50,836 controls). RESULTS: This replication study provides additional strong evidence of an inverse association between rs865686 and breast cancer risk [study-adjusted per G-allele OR, 0.90; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.88; 0.91, P = 2.01 × 10(-29)] among women of European ancestry. There were ethnic differences in the estimated minor (G)-allele frequency among controls [0.09, 0.30, and 0.38 among, respectively, Asians, Eastern Europeans, and other Europeans; P for heterogeneity (P(het)) = 1.3 × 10(-143)], but no evidence of ethnic differences in per allele OR (P(het) = 0.43). rs865686 was associated with estrogen receptor-positive (ER(+)) disease (per G-allele OR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.86-0.91; P = 3.13 × 10(-22)) but less strongly, if at all, with ER-negative (ER(-)) disease (OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.94-1.02; P = 0.26; P(het) = 1.16 × 10(-6)), with no evidence of independent heterogeneity by progesterone receptor or HER2 status. The strength of the breast cancer association decreased with increasing age at diagnosis, with case-only analysis showing a trend in the number of copies of the G allele with increasing age at diagnosis (P for linear trend = 0.0095), but only among women with ER(+) tumors. CONCLUSIONS: This study is the first to show that rs865686 is a susceptibility marker for ER(+) breast cancer. IMPACT: The findings further support the view that genetic susceptibility varies according to tumor subtype.
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    A Nonsynonymous Polymorphism in IRS1 Modifies Risk of Developing Breast and Ovarian Cancers in BRCA1 and Ovarian Cancer in BRCA2 Mutation Carriers
    Ding, YC ; McGuffog, L ; Healey, S ; Friedman, E ; Laitman, Y ; Shani-Paluch-Shimon, ; Kaufman, B ; Liljegren, A ; Lindblom, A ; Olsson, H ; Kristoffersson, U ; Stenmark-Askmalm, M ; Melin, B ; Domchek, SM ; Nathanson, KL ; Rebbeck, TR ; Jakubowska, A ; Lubinski, J ; Jaworska, K ; Durda, K ; Gronwald, J ; Huzarski, T ; Cybulski, C ; Byrski, T ; Osorio, A ; Ramony Cajal, T ; Stavropoulou, AV ; Benitez, J ; Hamann, U ; Rookus, M ; Aalfs, CM ; de Lange, JL ; Meijers-Heijboer, HEJ ; Oosterwijk, JC ; van Asperen, CJ ; Garcia, EBG ; Hoogerbrugge, N ; Jager, A ; van der Luijt, RB ; Easton, DF ; Peock, S ; Frost, D ; Ellis, SD ; Platte, R ; Fineberg, E ; Evans, DG ; Lalloo, F ; Izatt, L ; Eeles, R ; Adlard, J ; Davidson, R ; Eccles, D ; Cole, T ; Cook, J ; Brewer, C ; Tischkowitz, M ; Godwin, AK ; Pathak, H ; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D ; Sinilnikova, OM ; Mazoyer, S ; Barjhoux, L ; Leone, M ; Gauthier-Villars, M ; Caux-Moncoutier, V ; de Pauw, A ; Hardouin, A ; Berthet, P ; Dreyfus, H ; Ferrer, SF ; Collonge-Rame, M-A ; Sokolowska, J ; Buys, S ; Daly, M ; Miron, A ; Terry, MB ; Chung, W ; John, EM ; Southey, M ; Goldgar, D ; Singer, CF ; Tea, M-KM ; Gschwantler-Kaulich, D ; Fink-Retter, A ; Hansen, TVO ; Ejlertsen, B ; Johannsson, OT ; Offit, K ; Sarrel, K ; Gaudet, MM ; Vijai, J ; Robson, M ; Piedmonte, MR ; Andrews, L ; Cohn, D ; DeMars, LR ; DiSilvestro, P ; Rodriguez, G ; Toland, AE ; Montagna, M ; Agata, S ; Imyanitov, E ; Isaacs, C ; Janavicius, R ; Lazaro, C ; Blanco, I ; Ramus, SJ ; Sucheston, L ; Karlan, BY ; Gross, J ; Ganz, PA ; Beattie, MS ; Schmutzler, RK ; Wappenschmidt, B ; Meindl, A ; Arnold, N ; Niederacher, D ; Preisler-Adams, S ; Gadzicki, D ; Varon-Mateeva, R ; Deissler, H ; Gehrig, A ; Sutter, C ; Kast, K ; Nevanlinna, H ; Aittomaki, K ; Simard, J ; Spurdle, AB ; Beesley, J ; Chen, X ; Tomlinson, GE ; Weitzel, J ; Garber, JE ; Olopade, OI ; Rubinstein, WS ; Tung, N ; Blum, JL ; Narod, SA ; Brummel, S ; Gillen, DL ; Lindor, N ; Fredericksen, Z ; Pankratz, VS ; Couch, FJ ; Radice, P ; Peterlongo, P ; Greene, MH ; Loud, JT ; Mai, PL ; Andrulis, IL ; Glendon, G ; Ozcelik, H ; Gerdes, A-M ; Thomassen, M ; Jensen, UB ; Skytte, A-B ; Caligo, MA ; Lee, A ; Chenevix-Trench, G ; Antoniou, AC ; Neuhausen, SL (AMER ASSOC CANCER RESEARCH, 2012-08-01)
    BACKGROUND: We previously reported significant associations between genetic variants in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and breast cancer risk in women carrying BRCA1 mutations. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the IRS1 variants modified ovarian cancer risk and were associated with breast cancer risk in a larger cohort of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. METHODS: IRS1 rs1801123, rs1330645, and rs1801278 were genotyped in samples from 36 centers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Data were analyzed by a retrospective cohort approach modeling the associations with breast and ovarian cancer risks simultaneously. Analyses were stratified by BRCA1 and BRCA2 status and mutation class in BRCA1 carriers. RESULTS: Rs1801278 (Gly972Arg) was associated with ovarian cancer risk for both BRCA1 (HR, 1.43; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.06-1.92; P = 0.019) and BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR, 2.21; 95% CI, 1.39-3.52, P = 0.0008). For BRCA1 mutation carriers, the breast cancer risk was higher in carriers with class II mutations than class I mutations (class II HR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.28-2.70; class I HR, 0.86; 95%CI, 0.69-1.09; P(difference), 0.0006). Rs13306465 was associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 class II mutation carriers (HR, 2.42; P = 0.03). CONCLUSION: The IRS1 Gly972Arg single-nucleotide polymorphism, which affects insulin-like growth factor and insulin signaling, modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 class II mutation carriers. IMPACT: These findings may prove useful for risk prediction for breast and ovarian cancers in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.
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    In Drosophila, RhoGEF2 cooperates with activated Ras in tumorigenesis through a pathway involving Rho1-Rok-Myosin-II and JNK signalling
    Khoo, P ; Allan, K ; Willoughby, L ; Brumby, AM ; Richardson, HE (COMPANY BIOLOGISTS LTD, 2013-05-01)
    The Ras oncogene contributes to ≈ 30% of human cancers, but alone is not sufficient for tumorigenesis. In a Drosophila screen for oncogenes that cooperate with an activated allele of Ras (Ras(ACT)) to promote tissue overgrowth and invasion, we identified the GTP exchange factor RhoGEF2, an activator of Rho-family signalling. Here, we show that RhoGEF2 also cooperates with an activated allele of a downstream effector of Ras, Raf (Raf(GOF)). We dissect the downstream pathways through which RhoGEF2 cooperates with Ras(ACT) (and Raf(GOF)), and show that RhoGEF2 requires Rho1, but not Rac, for tumorigenesis. Furthermore, of the Rho1 effectors, we show that RhoGEF2 + Ras (Raf)-mediated tumorigenesis requires the Rho kinase (Rok)-Myosin-II pathway, but not Diaphanous, Lim kinase or protein kinase N. The Rho1-Rok-Myosin-II pathway leads to the activation of Jun kinase (JNK), in cooperation with Ras(ACT). Moreover, we show that activation of Rok or Myosin II, using constitutively active transgenes, is sufficient for cooperative tumorigenesis with Ras(ACT), and together with Ras(ACT) leads to strong activation of JNK. Our results show that Rok-Myosin-II activity is necessary and sufficient for Ras-mediated tumorigenesis. Our observation that activation of Myosin II, which regulates Filamentous actin (F-actin) contractility without affecting F-actin levels, cooperates with Ras(ACT) to promote JNK activation and tumorigenesis, suggests that increased cell contractility is a key factor in tumorigenesis. Furthermore, we show that signalling via the Tumour necrosis factor (TNF; also known as Egr)-ligand-JNK pathway is most likely the predominant pathway that activates JNK upon Rok activation. Overall, our analysis highlights the need for further analysis of the Rok-Myosin-II pathway in cooperation with Ras in human cancers.
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    The BTB-zinc Finger Transcription Factor Abrupt Acts as an Epithelial Oncogene in Drosophila melanogaster through Maintaining a Progenitor-like Cell State
    Turkel, N ; Sahota, VK ; Bolden, JE ; Goulding, KR ; Doggett, K ; Willoughby, LF ; Blanco, E ; Martin-Blanco, E ; Corominas, M ; Ellul, J ; Aigaki, T ; Richardson, HE ; Brumby, AM ; Horwitz, MS (PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE, 2013-07-01)
    The capacity of tumour cells to maintain continual overgrowth potential has been linked to the commandeering of normal self-renewal pathways. Using an epithelial cancer model in Drosophila melanogaster, we carried out an overexpression screen for oncogenes capable of cooperating with the loss of the epithelial apico-basal cell polarity regulator, scribbled (scrib), and identified the cell fate regulator, Abrupt, a BTB-zinc finger protein. Abrupt overexpression alone is insufficient to transform cells, but in cooperation with scrib loss of function, Abrupt promotes the formation of massive tumours in the eye/antennal disc. The steroid hormone receptor coactivator, Taiman (a homologue of SRC3/AIB1), is known to associate with Abrupt, and Taiman overexpression also drives tumour formation in cooperation with the loss of Scrib. Expression arrays and ChIP-Seq indicates that Abrupt overexpression represses a large number of genes, including steroid hormone-response genes and multiple cell fate regulators, thereby maintaining cells within an epithelial progenitor-like state. The progenitor-like state is characterised by the failure to express the conserved Eyes absent/Dachshund regulatory complex in the eye disc, and in the antennal disc by the failure to express cell fate regulators that define the temporal elaboration of the appendage along the proximo-distal axis downstream of Distalless. Loss of scrib promotes cooperation with Abrupt through impaired Hippo signalling, which is required and sufficient for cooperative overgrowth with Abrupt, and JNK (Jun kinase) signalling, which is required for tumour cell migration/invasion but not overgrowth. These results thus identify a novel cooperating oncogene, identify mammalian family members of which are also known oncogenes, and demonstrate that epithelial tumours in Drosophila can be characterised by the maintenance of a progenitor-like state.