School of Culture and Communication - Research Publications

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    Edgar Wind and Giovanni Bellini’s ‘Feast of the Gods’: An Iconographic ‘Enfant Terrible’
    Anderson, J (Bernardino Branca, 2022-05-25)
    Since its creation, Giovanni Bellini’s late masterpiece The Feast of the Gods, has never been an easy painting to understand. When Edgar Wind published his monograph in 1948, it received an uneven critical reception. Wind’s interpretation of the painting will be re-evaluated in relation to past and present scholarship, with insights from Wind’s papers at the Bodleian Library, Oxford, as well as other archives. Inevitably as an editor of two volumes of his writings it is partly autobiographical.
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    On the trail of a missing Italian Masterpiece
    Anderson, J ; Home, R (The Australian, 2022-01-29)
    Evidence that the painting by Paolo Veronese of The Pool of Bethesda, found its way to Scotland, when it was donated by Captain James Volum to his home town of Peterhead
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    A Gamechanger for Giorgione
    Anderson, J (Colnaghi Foundation, 2021)
    The article discusses the reaction to the discovery of a rare drawing by Giorgione and an inscription about him on the last page of the 1497 edition of Dante's Commedia, in the library of the Sydney University. It examines the writing of Giorgione's pupils and contemporaries to see if the handwriting may be identified: Leonardo, Catena, Sebastiano del Piombo, Titian and others.
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    Lost in Australia? A Missing Masterpiece
    Anderson, J ; Home, R (The Australian, 2022-01-15)
    A painting by Paolo Veronese of The Pool of Bethesda was offered to the NGV, was rejected and then went missing. The article asks for help finding it.
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    A Gamechanger for Giorgione
    Anderson, J (Colnaghi Foundation, 2021-10-01)
    The article discusses the reaction to the discovery of a rare drawing by Giorgione and an inscription about him on the last page of the 1497 edition of Dante's Commedia, in the library of the Sydney University. It examines the writing of Giorgione's pupils and contemporaries to see if the handwriting may be identified: Leonardo, Catena, Sebastiano del Piombo, Titian and others.
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    The Invention of Curatorship in Australia: Review of "Recent Past. Writing Australian Art" by Daniel Thomas, edited by Hannah Fink and Steven Miller, Sydney: Art Gallery of New South Wales
    Anderson, J (University of Birmingham, 2021-12-01)
    Daniel Thomas’s first volume of collected writings is a small sample from about a thousand articles written over seventy years. From the time Thomas returned to Australia from Oxford to become the first curator of Australian art at the Art Gallery of New South Wales in 1958, he emerged as a leading figure in the Australian art world. Then as the inaugural head of Australian art at the newly established National Gallery, Canberra (1978-1984), and as Director of the Art Gallery of Australia (1984-1990), he developed curatorship as a profession, created national collections with remarkable acquisitions, developed provenance research and much more.
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    The Invention of curatorship in Australia
    Anderson, J (University of Birmingham, 2021-08-10)
    Daniel Thomas’s first volume of collected writings is a small sample from about a thousand articles written over seventy years. From the time Thomas returned to Australia from Oxford to become the first curator of Australian art at the Art Gallery of New South Wales in 1958, he emerged as a leading figure in the Australian art world. Then as the inaugural head of Australian art at the newly established National Gallery, Canberra (1978-1984), and as Director of the Art Gallery of Australia (1984-1990), he developed curatorship as a profession, created national collections with remarkable acquisitions, developed provenance research and much more.
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    Giorgione
    Anderson, J ; DaCosta Kaufmann, T (Oxford University Press, 2021-06-23)
    Giorgione was a Venetian painter who was born at Castelfranco, some fifty kilometers from Venice, in 1473/74. His life ended tragically at the age of 36 on 17 September 1510, when he died of the plague. In contemporary documents his name is given in Venetian dialect as Zorzi da Castelfranco (George from Castelfranco), or as Zorzon (Big George), in recognition of the celebrity he enjoyed during his lifetime. Baldassare Castiglione, in his “Book of the Courtier,” in 1516, recognized Giorgione as one of the greatest artists of his age, along with Leonardo da Vinci, Mantegna, Raphael, and Michelangelo. In 1548 the Venetian theorist Paolo Pino defined Giorgione as the painter of poetic brevity, as the inventor of new Venetian mode of creation. In 1550, in his Lives of the Artists, Giorgio Vasari endorsed this assessment and placed Giorgione as the artist who introduced the modern style of the High Renaissance to Venice.
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    Copies of Venetian Renaissance paintings on stringed instruments and the provenance of Giorgione’s Benson Holy Family in Washington
    Anderson, J (Colnaghi Foundation, 2020-10-07)
    Copies of Renaissance paintings on instruments of the violin family are extremely rare. In this article two exceptional examples of this genre are investigated from an art historical perspective for the first time. They are two violoncellos, dated Rome 1778, and 1816, that reproduce the Madonna and Child in Giorgione’s Benson Holy Family in the National Gallery of Art, Washington (1497) and the central motif of the Madonna and Child in Albrecht Dürer’s Madonna of the Rosegarlands (1506), National Gallery, Prague. Both these fine instruments are in private collections belonging to distinguished cellists. Since the year it was created Dürer’s Madonna of the Rosegarlands has been one of the most discussed and celebrated images, whereas Giorgione’s Holy Family was not well known until it arrived in Washington in 1951. How and where these two paintings were accessible to a copyist is perplexing and raise questions about the provenance of the paintings they reproduce. Both instruments were made by the Roman luthier Luigi Amici, whose shop was in close proximity to the Vatican for an unknown patron or patrons, perhaps religious, who appreciated Venetian Renaissance painting from the first decade of the High Renaissance.
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    How the Biography of Giovanni Morelli has been read. Come e stata letta la Biografia di Giovanni Morelli
    Anderson, J (Riccardo Manfrin, 2020-07-10)
    An account by a first time biographer/author of the experience of writing a biography of a nineteenth century Italian, Giovanni Morelli. The text is both in Italian and English and presents the author's motivation for writing the biography as a different kind of art history.