School of Culture and Communication - Research Publications

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    Making and Marketing Porcelain in Eighteenth-Century London
    Martin, M ; Garrioch, D (Brill, 2022)
    This volume moves away from the model of knowledge 'transfer' and, drawing on new understandings of artisan work, considers the links between artisan creativity and mobility.
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    Young children's haptic media habitus
    Nansen, B ; Green, L ; Holloway, D ; Stevenson, K ; Leaver, T ; Haddon, L (Routledge - Taylor & Francis, 2020-10-28)
    Young children’s engagement with digital media centres on their embodied relations, shaped with and through the interfaces, materiality, and mobility of tablets and smartphones. This chapter draws on ethnographic observation of young children’s mobile media practices in family homes to explore the embodied dimensions of digital media interfaces, while engaging with user interface and mobile app developer literature, and phenomenologically informed cultural theory. It reveals the emergence of a ‘haptic habitus’: the cultivation of embodied dispositions for touchscreen conduct and competence. Configured by both cultural and commercial operations, this habitus involves context, user interface studies, and the design of gestural input.
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    Senses and Sensors of Sleep: Digital Mediation and Disconnection in Sleep Architectures
    Nansen, B ; Mannell, K ; O’Neill, C ; Jansson, A (Oxford University Press, 2021-01-01)

    This chapter analyzes sleep technology products designed to mediate and modulate patterns of sleep. Products analyzed include sleep-tracking applications and wearable devices for customizing personal phases of sleep architecture, and “smart” bedroom systems that use sensors and Internet connectivity to monitor and automate sensory environments to optimize the architectural spaces of sleep. Drawing on theories of digital disconnection, this chapter highlights how historical and theoretical notions of sleep as a site of subjective, social, and technological disconnection are reworked by contemporary media technologies. The now ubiquitous use of smartphones in bed reflects ongoing demands for digital participation and productivity. Yet such arrangements are unevenly distributed, with disconnective sleep technologies operating as a form of privilege and distinction for those who have the resources to reshape the architectures of personal sleep rhythms and spaces.

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    Automating Digital Afterlives
    Fordyce, R ; Nansen, B ; Arnold, M ; Kohn, T ; Gibbs, M ; Jansson, A ; Adams, PC (Oxford University Press, 2021-08-26)
    The question of how the dead “live on” by maintaining a presence and connecting to the living within social networks has garnered the attention of users, entrepreneurs, platforms, and researchers alike. In this chapter we investigate the increasingly ambiguous terrain of posthumous connection and disconnection by focusing on a diverse set of practices implemented by users and offered by commercial services to plan for and manage social media communication, connection, and presence after life. Drawing on theories of self-presentation (Goffman) and technological forms of life (Lash), we argue that moderated and automated performances of posthumous digital presence cannot be understood as a continuation of personal identity or self-presentation. Rather, as forms of mediated human (after)life, posthumous social media presence materializes ambiguities of connection/disconnection and self/identity.
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    Response to Natalie Harkin: A Labor of Love
    Leane, J ; Hall, M ; Disney, D (Palgrave Macmillan, 2021)
    This response to Narungga poet Natalie Harkin’s epistle echoes questions posed by Cherokee academic Daniel Heath Justice: “How do we honor those mysteries that both connect and distinguish us? How do we respect the silences and recognize when and where to tread lightly, if to tread at all?” While settler students misconceptualize trauma and deficit as the only forms of subjecthood available to Aboriginal peoples, this chapter asserts a range of activist modes by which we may overcome what Toni Morrison terms “national amnesia.” Reflecting on the selfless engagements of Wiradjuri activist, poet, and author Aunty Kerry Reed-Gilbert, we see an exemplar who refused the State’s desire to have Australians forget colonial histories of injustice that determine contemporary life. As she knew, something lingers in Australia; our work remains in articulating this unfinished business.
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    Museums as Actors of City Diplomacy: From “Hard” Assets to “Soft” Power
    Grincheva, N ; Fitzpatrick, K ; Byrne, C (Springer International Publishing, 2020)
    Historically, museums have earned their dedicated role as important agents of cultural diplomacy. In the age of increasing urbanization, museums have become important center of urban soft power and actors of city diplomacy. This chapter argues that museums are vital actors of city diplomacy, because of a high cultural and economic value of their “hard” or tangible resources and “soft” power of their social activities that engage global audiences and facilitate international cultural relations. This chapter discusses this framework of museum diplomacy resources and outputs in two main sections. The first section focuses on “hard” assets of museums such as collections and facilities. It explains why and how the cultural infrastructure offered by museums play an important role in city diplomacy, especially in place making and city branding. The second section explores soft power generated by museums through their social activities and programming that help activate cultural resources and transform them into diplomatic outputs.
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    Is there a Place for a Crowdsourcing in Multilateral Diplomacy? Searching for a New Museum Definition
    Grincheva, N ; Bjola, C ; Zaiotti, R (Routledge, 2020-10-29)
    This chapter explores the practice of crowdsourcing in global governance as a tool of multilateral diplomacy to interrogate its exact role and place in the decision-making processes. It investigates the case of the online cultural diplomacy of the International Commission of Museums (ICOM), focusing on the 2019 crowdsourcing campaign delivered by the ICOM’s Standing Committee for Museum Definition, which aimed to collect public contributions to re-define the museum agency in the 21st century. The chapter draws on media discourse analysis of the public debates concerning the new definition and applies content analysis of the 268 definitions submitted by the public to the ICOM’s official online platform. It also features interview insights from the MDPP Committee Chair. Based on key findings, the chapter argues that in the context of ICOM, multilateralism 2.0 remains a desirable vision rather than a reality.
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    Museum Collections and Their Legacies
    Allen, L ; McNiven, I ; David, B (Oxford Handbooks Online, 2021)
    Museums continue to be cast as anachronistic—‘weary’, ‘tired’, and ‘out of touch’—trophy houses embedded in the colonial past, with object collections considered hollow remnants of that past. This article contests this notion and reveals how museums have emerged over the past fifty years as active field sites where Indigenous communities, scholars, artists, and artisans in the Pacific have been and are engaging with their cultural patrimony. This approach has seen new meanings and readings of, and new life breathed into, these collections in ways never imagined or anticipated. The museum is a space where differing epistemologies have engaged, conflicted, and negotiated, enabling the reshaping and recovery of meanings within the things held in collections; a process that sits at the centre of the current decolonizing discourse. For Indigenous people, these museum holdings are a unique and tangible link to the past that can perhaps be found only in memory. This article provides a nuanced understanding of the complexities associated with museum collections and their enduring legacies realized through the engagement of Indigenous people with their cultural patrimony.
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    Light Art and the Aesthetics of Urban Appropriation
    McQuire, S ; Andrews, J ; LaWare, M (Peter Lang Incorporated, International Academic Publishers, 2022-05-31)
    This book brings together a host of academics who seek to expand the notion of a "communicative city" by looking at the role that art and public culture play in the rapidly expanding global landscape.
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    Cloudy Thoughts: Cognition and Affect in Troilus and Criseyde
    Trigg, S ; Jahner, J ; Nelson, I (Lehigh University Press, 2022)