School of Culture and Communication - Research Publications

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    Understanding gendered transnational education mobility: Interview with Fran Martin
    Martin, F ; Song, L (SAGE Publications, 2023-12-01)
    In this interview, Fran Martin discusses gendered transnational education mobility in relation to research methodology, the contradictions of neoliberal ideology, and the social implications of ethnographic research. Challenging stereotypical and often biased portrayals of Chinese international students in the Anglosphere, Martin argues for the importance of attending to the irreducible details of individual life experiences and explains how to employ affective methods to convey these details to readers. Calling for attention to gender as a key perspective in understanding education mobility, she discusses how the global neoliberal discourse underpinning this form of mobility can be restricting and empowering at the same time. She also reflects on the ways in which researchers could engage with social and policy realities and contribute to improving international students’ well-being.
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    Artists’ interviews and their use in conservation: reflections on issues and practices
    Cotte, S ; TSE, N ; Inglis, A (Routledge - Taylor & Francis, 2016-12-21)
    Artists’ interviews are widely used in the conservation of contemporary art. Best practice is detailed in recent publications, conferences and workshops, however, there is little information on how to analyse the data collected, and the issues related to the dissemination and future access to the content. This article examines various techniques of analysis appropriated from qualitative research in the social sciences, and relates them to the intended uses of interviews in conservation. Drawing on a case study that involved interaction with an artist over several years, including interviews and informal conversations, this article argues that a conservators’ specific skills set has the capacity to interpret the findings and to understand the creative processes. It also highlights the importance of reflexivity and the public circulation of this interpretation, which is essential for the development of a sustainable practice of artists’ interviews in conservation.
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    To Catch a Djinn: A ghazal for my Dadi and her sisters
    Niaz, N (Usawa Literary Review, 2020)
    This poem takes a family story originally told in Urdu and tells it in English, but as a ghazal. In this way the form reflects the relationship between narrator and story even though the language has been changed. The form, with its strict use of rhyme and rhythm, injects a playfulness to the narrative that reflects the age of the characters and the fantastical elements of the story. This is a new use of the ghazal, which is often a more serious, romantic form in English.
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    Beyond the smart city: a communications-led agenda for twentyfirst century cities
    McQuire, S (Walter de Gruyter GmbH, 2023-06-27)
    Digital media technologies, from networked sensors to large video screens and mobile devices, have become pervasive urban infrastructure in the twentyfirst century. The dominant framework for understanding the integration of digital technology into urban space has been smart city discourse. In this article, I will argue that this framework, as it has so far been articulated, is inadequate to maximizing the social potential of digital urban infrastructure. Digital urban infrastructure not only changes how cities look, but how they function as social settings. I will propose the ‘communicative city’ as an alternative framework for thinking about digitally mediated cities. The communicative city offers an opportunity to consider networked urban space as a test case in which key problematics of contemporary globalized media are materially instantiated. It is the frontier zone at which everyday experiences of embodied media and new forms of communicative agency collide with powerful logics of tracing and tracking, and the widespread deployment of new forms of automation and machine learning as techniques of urban governance.
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    An Archive of 'Feelings' @ 20: An interview with Ann Cvetkovich
    Cvetkovich, A ; Dragojlovic, A ; Quinan, CL (SAGE Publications, 2023-02)
    Feminist and queer studies scholar Ann Cvetkovich’s trailblazing book An Archive of Feelings: Trauma, Sexuality, and Lesbian Public Cultures has had an immense influence on the field of memory studies, inspiring new bodies of scholarship on queerness, trauma, and memory. In this interview, Cvetkovich discusses the impact that some of the book’s central concepts have had on the field of memory studies over the last 20 years. Cvetkovich also reflects on the role that An Archive of Feelings has had in bringing affect into feminist and queer work on sexuality, intimacy, and everyday life. Furthermore, she reflects on another of her groundbreaking books, Depression: A Public Feeling, in which she applies queer cultural analysis to unusual archives and writes critical memoir in order to situate depression as an historical category. The interview closes with Cvetkovich’s reflections on her current work on queer Indigenous approaches to trauma.
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    Queering and decolonising the museum: 'In the Presence of Absence' exhibition at the Stedelijk Museum
    Dragojlovic, A ; Quinan, CL (SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC, 2023-02)
    This review engages with the recent ‘In the Presence of Absence’ exhibition (2020–2021), which was held at the Stedelijk Museum of Modern Art (Amsterdam, the Netherlands). By focusing on three artistic interventions included in the exhibition (Werker Collective’s ‘A Gestural History of the Young Worker’, Farida Sedoc’s ‘The Future Ain’t What it Used to Be’, and Jennifer Tee’s ‘Tampan Ship of Souls #2’ and ‘Tampan the Collected Bodies’), we aim to highlight ways of creatively queering and decolonizing artistic practices and spaces, including museums and conventional memory narratives.
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    Affective silences: Violence, heteropatriarchy, intergenerationality
    Dragojlovic, A (Wiley, 2023-12)
    Personal experiences of violence are often shrouded in silence, which can be perceived both as a form of ongoing violence and as a powerful method of resistance in and of itself (Rich, 1979). Feminist academics, public intellectuals, and activists have continually argued that speech is the foremost means of achieving equality and empowerment (Ahmed, 2017; Lorde, 1984). Feminist scholarship has also been invested in exploring the generative possibilities that silences can engender (Malhotra and Rowe, 2013), and anthropologists have called for an understanding of silence, particularly in the aftermath of violence, as “a descent into the ordinary” that allows for a repair of the self through the quiet inhabitation of an everyday “gesture of mourning” (Das, 2007, 77; Samuels, 2023; Shohet, 2023).
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    Queering memory: Toward re-membering otherwise
    Dragojlovic, A ; Quinan, CL (SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC, 2023-02)
    This editorial introduction provides a theoretical framework for analyzing relationships between gender, sexuality, and memory. Using the concept of queering memory, the special issue proposes queering memory as a practice of innovative and generative history-making that has the capacity to reorder time and memory. The contributions collected in this special issue take up the notions of “queer” and “queering” in their multiple forms, not only in reference to gender and sexuality but also as disordered, non-normative, and subversive potentialities that unsettle power relations. Building on this approach, the contributions engage with art, archives, museums, television, performance, philosophy, and cultural artifacts to explore how queering memory can serve as a strategy for building alternative narratives that impact which memories are privileged and which are hidden or silenced.