School of Culture and Communication - Research Publications

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    Art and Evolution: A Partnership in Excess
    Brophy, K (ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2009-01-01)
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    'Man-moth' and the flame of influence: A poet reading poetry
    Brophy, K (CENT STUDIES AUSTRALIAN LIT, 2004-11-01)
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    The Politics of Style: Staying Alive
    BROPHY, K (Australasian Association of Writing Programs, 2008)
    For the poet style is a matter of life and death. Far from being an adornment to an artefact, style is central to what is communicated by a poet. Aristotle identified the two tendencies in style, that towards a language of the people, and that towards an exotic, metaphoric language. The aims of these extremes of style, he suggested, are in turn clarity and dignity. There is a continuing politics and a continuing war between writers committed to one or the other extreme of style in literature. William Carlos Williams and TS Eliot were in opposite camps when it came to a stand on style. Annie Dillard and more lately James Wood continue the debate in their essays on style in prose fiction. William Gass and Raymond Carver provide examples of commitment to one or the other mode. Putting aside the debate over which camp a writer might belong in, I pursue the question of what might make a style 'work' or not work. Adapting ideas expressed by Christopher Alexander in his 1979 architectural study of the 'timeless' way of building, I propose that beyond the politics of style there is the question of whether one's style is 'alive' - and that this question is, for poets, at the centre of what they are communicating, and whether they can live as writers. I offer examples of writers from the absurdist Russian movement of the 1930s and from the romantic poet, Heinrich von Kleist who wrote an unfinished essay on 'The Gradual Production of Thoughts while Speaking'.
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    Repulsion and Day-dreaming: Freud Writing Freud
    Brophy, K (ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2006-01-01)
    Beginning with a reflection on our helplessness in the face of our own discoveries about ourselves in the course of living, this paper outlines the several ways in which psychoanalysis has documented and constructed this helplessness; in turn, Freud’s own writings can be read as his own ‘helpless’ response to early experiences. This paper offers a reading of Freud’s 1907 essay, ‘Creative writers and day-dreaming’ as an unconscious expression of his fear of repulsion (in himself and from others), matched to a desire to seduce the reader. For Freud, though, repulsion is inescapable, for creative writing in his view is never more than foreplay. What then of writing that confronts and unsettles?
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    Writing PhDs: Integrational Linguistics and a New Poetics for the PhD
    Brophy, K (Australasian Association of Writing Programs, 2007)
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    The prose poem: a short history, a brief reflection and a dose of the real thing
    BROPHY, KJ (Australasian Association of Writing Programs, 2002)
    The prose poem arrived as a new self-proclaimed literary form in France, through Charles Baudelaire with his 1861 collection, Petits poèmes en prose. In a preface to one of these small poems he acknowledged Aloysius Bertrand’s Gaspard de la Nuit (1842) as his model. The next generation of French poets, including Mallarmé, Rimbaud and Lautréamont, took up this new form in a spirit of revolt and freedom from the constraining traditions of French verse. Richard Terdiman has written that ‘at just the historical moment when the term “prosaic” was mutating into a pejorative, the prose poem sought to reevaluate the expressive possibilities, and the social functionality, of prose itself’ (Terdiman 261).