School of Culture and Communication - Research Publications

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    I’ve written my talk: blogging, writing and temporality
    TRIGG, STEPHANIE ( 2007)
    Between the poles of speaking and writing, where do we place a published version of a written talk given about blogging? I find, as I write this up, that I can’t keep a straight writerly face. I’m unable to render the layers of past and present into a seamless tense, a smooth representation of speaking about writing, or writing about speaking. Mostly, we know how to read and write the conventions for ‘writing up a talk’, but the subject of blogging seems to call forth a different kind of reflection. Or does it?
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    “Shamed be …”: historicizing shame in medieval and early modern courtly ritual
    TRIGG, STEPHANIE ( 2006)
    This essay explores the relationship between shame and honor in various texts and practices associated with medieval chivalry, and especially in The Order of the Garter. The meaning and significance of the motto of the Order–Honi soit qui mal y pense–is contested, but it emphasizes the close relationship between shame and honor in courtly society. The motto may not be an embedded coded reference to an unknown event; it may have been coined by Edward III to generate a sense of mystery appropriate to a courtly elite. An examination of selected literary texts (incluing Malory’s Works and Shakespere’s Henry VI, Part One) and historical documents describing the ceremonial rituals of heraldic degradation and courtly shame suggests a remarkable continuity in the understanding of courtly shame between the medieval and the early modern period in England. This continuity is ignored by several recent commentators on shame, who unconsciously rehearse and repeat the abjection of the medieval past in contrast to the renaissance understanding of shame.
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    ‘Medieval Literature' or 'Early Europe'?: How to win grants and change the course of scholarship
    TRIGG, STEPHANIE (Wiley Blackwell, 2006)
    This paper explores the unexpected success of the Network for Early EuropeanResearch, based at the University of Western Australia, which was recently awardedA$1.6 million over a five-year period to support research and postgraduate trainingin medieval and early modern studies in Australia. What lessons can be drawn fromthe success of this grant application for other projects in medieval studies that mustcompete for funding in national contests across all the disciplines? One of thedistinctive strengths of the Network is its willingness to think in unusually broadterms about the influential reach of medieval and early modern social and culturalforms into settler colonies like eighteenth-century Australia and beyond. But towhat extent might government priorities be driving the nature of research? Howcan medieval studies best respond to these external pressures?
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    Learning to Live
    TRIGG, STEPHANIE (Oxford University Press, 2007)
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    The Vulgar History of the Order of the Garter
    TRIGG, S ; McMullan, G ; Matthews, D (Cambridge University Press, 2007)
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    Chaucer's influence and reception
    TRIGG, STEPHANIE (Yale University Press, 2006)
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    The Pardoner's"lewed people": Apes, Japes and the Pre-history of Mass Culture
    TRIGG, S ; Evans, R ; Fulton, H ; Matthews, D (University of Wales Press, 2006)
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    I've Written My Talk: Blogging, Writing and Temporality
    TRIGG, S (Giramondo Publishing Company, 2007)