School of Culture and Communication - Research Publications

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    Privilege or problem: The distinct role of government in arts development in South Australia
    Caust, J (ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2005-01-01)
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    Explorations in creative writing
    BROPHY, KJ (Melbourne University Press, 2003)
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    Putting the “art” back into arts policy making: how arts policy has been “captured” by the economists and the marketers
    Caust, J (Taylor and Francis Group, 2003-03-01)
    This paper explores the current discourse about arts policy and funding and its placement within an economic paradigm. The models of “cultural industry” and “creative industry” are explored and how they affect arts funding discourse. Similarly the impact of the introduction of the language of industry and business to the arts sector is considered. If bottom-line arguments are used by funders, governments and critics to argue the merits or otherwise of arts activity, how does this affect arts practice? In recent times arts funding agencies have been restructured to reflect a market-driven agenda rather than an arts-driven agenda. The impact of all these issues is considered in the context of Australian arts' models in particular, but with reference to examples in the United Kingdom and the United States of America. The paper concludes with suggestions for a reassertion of core cultural values in future discourse.
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    Impact aesthetics: Back to the future in digital cinema? Millennial fantasies
    McQuire, S (SAGE Publications, 2000-12-01)
    This article engages recent debates about the future of cinema in the digital age. Firstly, it seeks to broaden the rather narrow terms in which the transition to digital cinema is often understood in film theory. Secondly, it tries to assess claims about the 'demise of narrative' frequently associated with the digital threshold. On one level, it is argued that a dialectical understanding of the relation between terms such as 'narrative' and 'spectacle' is needed to advance current debates. On another level, it is suggested that digital technology should not be wholly defined by the current dominance of 'blockbuster' films. In place of technological determinism, an understanding based on the politics of spectacle and distracted spectatorship is advanced.
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    Cyberspace Romance: The Psychology of Online Relationships
    Whitty, MT ; Carr, AN (Macmillan Education UK, 2006)
    This book focuses on online relationships and specifically cyber-flirting; the authors examine how flirting offline can be transferred to an Internet setting, through their own empirical and theoretical research.
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    Errata
    Mosquera, G ; Papastergiadis, N ; Belting, H ; Gardner, A ; Weng Choy, L ; Medina, C ; Hoskote, R ; Bal, M ; Amorales, C ; Kallat, RS ; Lucas, C ; Ong, S ; Kane, A ; Suberi, T ; Basbaum, R ; PAPASTERGIADIS, N ; Mosequera, G (WILEY, 2005-06)
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    Genevieve Grieves
    LOWISH, S (un Projects Inc., 2006)
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    Haywood’s re-appropriation of the amatory heroine in Betsy Thoughtless
    Hultquist, Aleksondra (University of Iowa, 2006)
    Eliza Haywood’s domestic fiction, epitomized by The History of Miss Betsy Thoughtless (1751), does not reject the modes of her earlier amatory fiction work (such as her 1724 Fantomina), but instead dialectically incorporates it. By considering both Pamela and Betsy Thoughtless in the context of Haywood’s amatory fiction of the 1720s, this paper argues that the struggle to appropriate the narrative of the sexually experienced woman highlights the dialogic complexities of the relationships between amatory and domestic fiction in the mid-eighteenth century. The perseverance of amatory modes of writing in later eighteenth-century domestic novels gestures toward alternate ideological possibilities for female subjectivity through both the exercise of virtue and the exploration of sexual desire.
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