School of Culture and Communication - Research Publications

Permanent URI for this collection

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 1676
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Does the art end when the management begins? The challenges of making ‘art’ for both artists and arts managers
    Caust, J (Arts & Cultural Management Program, University of South Australia, School of Management, 2010)
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Arts and business: The impact of business models on the activities of major performing arts organisations in Australia
    Caust, J (University of Queensland, School of Languages and Comparative Cultural Studies, 2010)
    Managerial business models were first introduced to Australian subsidised performing arts organisations by the then Howard Coalition government in 2000. Until the early 1990s, Australian arts organisations were contextualised as 'not for profit' entities, with an overall objective of producing good art. Over the past decade, however, major Australian performing arts organisations have been viewed more frequently as part of an 'industry' and, within this industry construct, framed as 'business entities', with a need to prove positive financial outcomes as a first priority. This article explores what is meant by business models in the context of Australian major performing arts organisations and looks at the impact of this approach.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Thriving or surviving: Artists as leaders of smaller arts organizations
    CAUST, J ; caust, (Tilde University Press, 2013)
  • Item
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Arts Funding and the Cultural Wars; the continuing saga
    CAUST, J (Sookmyung Women's University, 2016-07-05)
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Marketing and sponsorship of the arts: A chicken and egg dilemma?
    Caust, J (Deakin University, 2018)
    This paper explores the potential impact of prioritising the ‘marketing’ of the arts over the ‘creation’ of art. Shifts in government policies, the development of the industry paradigm and the necessity to generate more income has meant that arts organisations have increasingly focussed on marketing their wares and finding additional sources of income. Has this increasing reliance on selling to the market place or dependence on the marketplace, had an impact on the nature of the undertaking? Do sponsors of art influence the outcomes? Has marketing become the end rather than a tool in the process? This discussion also raises issues the particular nature of arts making and whether increasing commercialisation perverts its integrity.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Cultural policy in an Australian setting
    Caust, J ; Barry, N ; Chen, P ; Haigh, Y ; Motta, SC ; Perche, D (Sydney University Press, 2023)
    The first open source and open access textbook on Australian politics, Australian Politics and Policy provides a unique, holistic coverage of politics and public topics for use in university courses. This 2023 edition includes 53 chapters, an unparalleled resource for instructors. With contributions from Australia’s leading politics and public policy scholars, the textbook includes material on Australian political history and philosophy, key political institutions and jurisdictions, Australian political sociology, public policy-making, and specialised chapters on a diverse range of policy topics. Each chapter was subject to anonymous and rigorous peer review to ensure the highest standards. The textbook comes with additional teaching resources including review questions and lecture slides. This third edition contains content updates and new chapters. This edition includes a new eight-chapter section on public policy and public sector management, covering areas such as public participation, intergovernmental coordination, policy implementation and resource management. The senior edition is aimed at later-year undergraduate and postgraduate students.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Shared Leadership and the Evolution of Festivals: What Can Be Learned?
    Caust, J ; Goodwin, K ; Jung, Y ; Vecco, M (Oxford University Press, 2023)
    Arts leadership can have various meanings and associations, both in the context of arts practice as well as in the challenges of running an arts organization. This chapter focuses on the leadership of arts festivals. The two common models of leadership within arts festivals are individuals and duos (where one member of the duo is the general manager/executive director and the other is the artistic director). When it is an individual leader, the festival’s organization is usually built around their skills and needs. In the duo model, either organizational leadership is shared between the role of executive leader and artistic leader, who both report to the board, or one is given the overall role of organizational leader. Recently, though, in arts festivals this duo model has evolved into more complex collaborative leadership approaches. This chapter explores two such examples: Rising, where three individuals share the CEO role, and Next Wave, which has created an eight-person artistic directorate.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Festivals, artists and entrepreneurialism: the role of the Adelaide Fringe Festival
    Caust, J ; Glow, H (Griffith University, Australia, 2011)
    This paper addresses the role of the Adelaide Fringe Festival in facilitating entrepreneurialism amongst participating artists. Tracing the discursive development of the notion of the entrepreneur, the paper identifies how entrepreneurialism has been taken up by the discourses of the creative industries. While we note that entrepreneurialism is a key strategy within the creative industries framework, it would appear for artists the concept does not necessarily connote the achievement of commercial outcomes. The paper argues that these cultural entrepreneurs are defined by self-reliance, the focus on the development of their craft, and the cultural value of their work.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Cultural wars in an Australian context: challenges in developing a national cultural policy
    Caust, J (ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2015-03-15)
    In March 2013, the Australian Federal Labor Government released Creative Australia. This document was described as the first national Cultural Policy statement in 20 years since the publication by a previous Labor Government of Creative Nation in 1994. However, within 6 months of the launch of this new policy, a Coalition (Conservative) Federal government was elected in September 2013. Up till now, Coalition Governments have rejected the need for a national cultural policy, so the future for Creative Australia may in fact be both contested and limited. Indeed, during the previous Federal Coalition Government a ‘cultural war’ erupted between the government and artists and intellectuals, over the latter’s desire for an Australian cultural policy. This paper addresses questions around the process of developing this new national cultural policy, why it occurred, and what future it might have now there is a new Coalition Federal Government in power.