School of Culture and Communication - Research Publications

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    The Arts Funding Divide: Would ‘Cultural Rights’ Produce a Fairer Approach?
    Caust, J ; Byrnes, W ; Brkic, A (Routledge, 2019-10-11)
    It seems that the funding of arts practice is always a contested domain, whatever political view or system is dominant. In some contexts, for example, there is no government support for the funding of arts practice, while in others there are different interpretations of what this entails. In most forms of government, several sectors of society (agriculture, mining, manufacturing and sport) receive government subsidies. In a capitalist state this is sometimes described as ‘welfare capitalism’. However, those opposed to the government funding of arts practice believe the arts should not be included in this framing because they are regarded as ‘non-essential’ (Bell and Oakley, 2015; Brabham, 2017; Brooks, 2001). Thus, in this framing the arts and cultural sector is not seen as a fundamental component of society and government support of the arts is seen as an indulgence and not a necessity.
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    Women and Arts Leadership
    Caust, J ; Caust, J (Routledge, 2018)
    Women are the major consumers of most arts practices, yet they are generally less visible than men in arts leadership roles. This chapter explores the issues and challenges around women in the arts and in arts leadership in different artforms. Judy b. Rosener argues that the expectations of women and men in the workplace are different because of long-term social conditioning. Exploring issues around gender and arts leadership is important because it relates to cultural, economic and social issues connected with both art and society. The invisibility of women as leaders in the arts is evidenced by who are recognized as the leaders of arts practice and the leaders of major arts institutions across the globe. Women are certainly visible as leaders of small to medium arts organizations in various artforms, but as the organizations become bigger or more important, the presence of women at the top diminishes.
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    Is UNESCO World Heritage recognition a blessing or burden? Evidence from developing Asian countries
    Caust, J ; Vecco, M (ELSEVIER FRANCE-EDITIONS SCIENTIFIQUES MEDICALES ELSEVIER, 2017-10)
    To both acknowledge and protect many cultural heritage expressions, sites and practices, UNESCO has instituted three conventions; Tangible Heritage, Intangible Heritage and Diversity of Cultural Expression. If a site/practice receives this UNESCO badge, it is an acknowledgment of its universal cultural and/or natural value as well as recognition of the need to protect it from harm. However, the UNESCO badge is an important marketing tool in world tourism and its presence ensures many more visitors to a site/practice that is UNESCO recognised. With increasing wealth and mobility, many more people are travelling than was possible even a decade ago. Increasing numbers of visitors can negatively impact on a site/practice as well as affect the local culture and integrity of a region, particularly in developing countries. So, is the UNESCO recognition a blessing or burden? This paper addresses the challenges that ensue from the UNESCO conventions by considering three UNESCO World Heritage case study sites in Asian developing countries. In particular, it seeks to understand the extent to which UNESCO's World Heritage approach protects or further undermines the cultural heritage sustainability of these sites.
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    Open Access Arts Festivals and Artists: Who Benefits?
    Caust, J (Taylor and Francis Group, 2019)
    Arts festivals are of interest to researchers, but the research focus is usually on the festival's economic or social impact. This approach does not usually reflect the engagement and experience of the artists involved. There has been controversy recently around the experiences of participating artists in open access arts festivals. Open access arts festivals are significant players in the festival landscape. They enable anyone to participate in a festival, if they pay a registration fee. This research, using a case study methodology, examines an open access festival from different perspectives with a focus on the experience of the participating artists.
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    Artists’ interviews and their use in conservation: reflections on issues and practices
    Cotte, S ; TSE, N ; Inglis, A (Routledge - Taylor & Francis, 2016-12-21)
    Artists’ interviews are widely used in the conservation of contemporary art. Best practice is detailed in recent publications, conferences and workshops, however, there is little information on how to analyse the data collected, and the issues related to the dissemination and future access to the content. This article examines various techniques of analysis appropriated from qualitative research in the social sciences, and relates them to the intended uses of interviews in conservation. Drawing on a case study that involved interaction with an artist over several years, including interviews and informal conversations, this article argues that a conservators’ specific skills set has the capacity to interpret the findings and to understand the creative processes. It also highlights the importance of reflexivity and the public circulation of this interpretation, which is essential for the development of a sustainable practice of artists’ interviews in conservation.
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    Papua New Guinea’s Resource Curse
    Chandler, J (Schwartz Media, 2018)
    PNG LNG has yielded gas worth billions for its Western operators. Local landowners have received no royalties at all. With anger rising, dire consequences were predicted. Then disaster struck.
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    The Butterfly Effect
    Chandler, J ; Schultz, J ; Hay, A (Griffith University and Text Publishing Company, 2019-02-05)
    Sometime in 1906, butterfly hunter Albert Stewart Meek disembarks from an old pearler named Hekla on the north-east coast of New Guinea. He unloads his provisions and tools of trade: killing bottles with cyanide of potassium for small insects, syringes with acetic acid for larger ones, non-rusting pins for setting his trophies, cork-lined collecting cases. He waves off the boat with instructions to the skipper to return for him in three months.
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    Unsettled Objects: Books, Cultural Politics, and the Case of Reading the Country
    Davis, M ; MORRISSEY, P ; Healy, C (UTS ePress, 2018)
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    Poetic Encounters
    Niaz, N (The Centre for Creative & Cultural Research, University of Canberra, 2019)
    Sound is essential to poetry and poetry is an essential element of human language. As a simultaneous trilingual engaged in the study of multilingual poetic expression, I will use the development of my own plurilingual poetic ‘instinct’ to map the location of poetry within and between languages. I argue that poetry does not grow out of language so much as inhabits the basic aural building blocks of language, the potential for it existing always just beneath the surface of speech. This is tested by examining multilingual poetry as well as translations of poetry across languages to see what is lost and what emerges.