School of Culture and Communication - Research Publications

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    (Re)imagining ambivalent Australia: the curriculum as a tool of nation
    Bacalja, A ; Bliss, L ; Bulfer, M (ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2021-07-17)
    This paper explores how Australian literature mandated for study in the Victorian senior English curriculum creates opportunities for problematizing central myths about Australia. We engage with Homi Bhabha’s notion of ambivalence to demonstrate how representations of colonization, rurality and migration reflect discursive formations of Australia. We consider how each discourse serves a pedagogic function, essentializing a set of myths about Australia: as having redeemed the violence done to Indigenous Australians in the colonial period, as embodying a white, rural masculine ideal, and as a welcoming nation open to migrants. Here, we show the points of orientation these texts provide, in their rearticulations of “the scraps … of daily life”, and further consider how the texts can problematize nationalist narratives.
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    Visual tactility: 'Oddly satisfying' videos, sensory genres and ambiguities in children's YouTube
    Nansen, B ; Balanzategui, J (SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC, 2022-05-27)
    This article contributes to research on children’s YouTube, online video genres and media consumption practices by focusing on genres that take shape at the intersection of digital media content and embodied sensation and in particular ‘oddly satisfying’ (OS) videos. This type of content has become popular on YouTube, where examples of satisfying and OS content include the manipulation or movement of a range of colourful or tactile materials such as slime, kinetic sand or icing a cake. To document the evolution and key characteristics of this genre, we analyse YouTube videos using content analysis methods. Our findings show the characteristics of this sensory genre can be understood through the concept of visual tactility, which highlights the synaesthetic feel of watching these videos. Further, we identify and examine how OS videos demonstrate ambiguities in children’s YouTube content, audiences and regulation by overlapping with other sensory genres and more adult content, such as ASMR. This analysis thus situates this sensory genre in relation to the developing study of children’s YouTube entertainment industries and media regulation.
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    Light Art and the Aesthetics of Urban Appropriation
    McQuire, S ; Andrews, J ; LaWare, M (Peter Lang Incorporated, International Academic Publishers, 2022-05-31)
    This book brings together a host of academics who seek to expand the notion of a "communicative city" by looking at the role that art and public culture play in the rapidly expanding global landscape.
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    Vincent Buckley, Colonialism and the Problem of Irish-Australian Identity
    McDonald, R (UNIV QUEENSLAND AUSTRALIAN LITERARY STUDIES, 2021-09-19)
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    Cloudy Thoughts: Cognition and Affect in Troilus and Criseyde
    Trigg, S ; Jahner, J ; Nelson, I (Lehigh University Press, 2022)
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    Edgar Wind and Giovanni Bellini’s ‘Feast of the Gods’: An Iconographic ‘Enfant Terrible’
    Anderson, J (Bernardino Branca, 2022-05-25)
    Since its creation, Giovanni Bellini’s late masterpiece The Feast of the Gods, has never been an easy painting to understand. When Edgar Wind published his monograph in 1948, it received an uneven critical reception. Wind’s interpretation of the painting will be re-evaluated in relation to past and present scholarship, with insights from Wind’s papers at the Bodleian Library, Oxford, as well as other archives. Inevitably as an editor of two volumes of his writings it is partly autobiographical.
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    This is where we have danced for quite a while – A Viewpoint/Reflection on Social Media Dist(d)ancing
    Benthaus, E (The Ohio State University Libraries, 2021-07-07)
    No abstract available.
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    De la ciudad como Cosmopolis a los espacios cosmopolitas
    Papastergiadis, N (Universidad de los Andes, 2021-01-01)
    The early boom in biennales coincided with the post-1989 malaise of internationalism and a tentative burst in cosmopolitan thinking. It was also caught in a massive rebranding of cities as attractors of global capital and hubs for creative economies. Between the hype and massive investment in arts infrastructure there has been a spectacular growth in contemporary art as an event. Both contemporary art and the biennale phenomenon have had an uneasy relationship to nations and regions. The topography of cities and the will to globality have been seen as more congruent with the postnational or transnational context of contemporary art. Hence, artists have aligned themselves with specific cities, or else they have sought to situate themselves in the coupling of cities and aspired to be part of a new cosmopolitan networking of urban centres. Since 1989 the status of the city has assumed a new significance that includes an often unspoken relationship between symbolic and financial capital. Let us take this moment to look again at the relationship between art and cities, and reflect on the need to imagine new spaces for cosmopolitanism.
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    George Lyell and Frederick Parkhurst Dodd: authority and expertise in nineteenth-century Australian entomology
    Coleman, D (Museums Victoria, 2021)
    This article focuses on the correspondence and careers of two lepidopterists, George Lyell and F. P. Dodd. Drawing on Dodd’s unpublished letters to Lyell during the late nineteenth-century rage for butterflying, it examines how private acquisition gave way to the professional activity of collecting and, in Lyell’s case, the eventual gifting of a large and significant collection of moths and butterflies to the National Museum of Victoria from 1932 through to 1946. The article also examines how issues of authority and expertise were measured and contested among collectors in this period.
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