School of Culture and Communication - Research Publications

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    Dramaturgies of Climate Crisis
    Wyatt, D ; Pfefferkorn, J (IATC, 2023)
    How is contemporary Australian performance responding to the climate crisis and what does this work teach us about inhabiting an emergent reality that is, as Timothy Morton has observed, “much larger, and more intractable, than we had supposed”? Drawing upon Marianne Van Kerkhoven’s “dramaturgy of the spectator” and the “oceanic dramaturgy” of Pacific Island performance (Hannah et al.), this article examines the Refuge art program, a six-year experiment in participatory performance and emergency preparedness that took place in Naarm/Melbourne between 2016–21. The dramaturgy of Refuge was based upon forging connections between communities, knowledges and practices not normally brought together. These interconnections made the reality of climate crisis apparent in new ways, as well as opening navigational pathways where others have seen only dead ends.
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    Scaling the ‘Ageing Migrant Body’ in Digital era: A Case of Older Chinese Migrants in Australia During the Covid-19 Pandemic
    Wang, WY (Taylor and Francis Group, 2024)
    Previous research on older migrants’ digital media use has primarily focused on understanding issues related to the ‘digital divide’, ‘transnational capital’, and ‘(im)mobility’. Few studies have investigated how these issues interplay and how they affect older migrants’ construction of selfhood, which informs their modalities of digital engagement. This article will address this gap, by drawing on the concept of ‘geographical scale’, to examine older Chinese migrants’ digital media use and their sense of self and belonging during COVID-19 lockdowns in Melbourne Australia. To achieve this, I analysed 31 interviews, which were collected from two sequential studies conducted in 2020 and 2021. The interview data revealed that older Chinese migrants’ diverse media practices and imaginaries are embedded in and informed by multiple sets of scales of the physical body, the family and domestic realm, the community sphere, and transnational network. It is found that digital media allow participants to navigate, negotiate with and even reconfigure these scales to cope with the challenges of ageing, migration and a global pandemic. However, digital media also produce new scales that differentiate older migrants from the rest of the population to sustain the structural inequality and social unevenness in Australia.
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    Children's Digital Picture Books: Readers and Publishers
    Day, K (Routledge, 2024-04-01)
    During the COVID-19 pandemic lockdowns, children’s media use increased (Mesce et al. 2021) while a decrease in print-book reading was observed (Nolan et al. 2022). An increase in tablet use suggests that when children were reading, it was mostly online in the form of ePub3 pdf files for illustrated works and prescribed school texts, while smartphone use was linked to apps and games. (Susilowati et al. 2021) For many years now, children’s publishers have experimented with digital picture-book formats but have regarded the genre as not suitable for digitisation. This book documents the findings of a one-year research project engaging the children’s publishing sector for feedback on reading trends and digital publishing in picture-book genres. The research assesses the plight of picture books in the current climate and considers how picture-book publishers cater to diverse readerships and new reading platforms post Covid-19 lockdowns and into the digital age. Written by an academic and editor with over 15 years industry experience, this book offers a nuanced response to children’s picture book publishing and reception for librarians, teachers, publishers and international scholars in the fields of publishing studies, library studies, early childhood studies, early education and childhood psychology.
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    "What Creativeness in This?”: Maintenance and Generation in the Housework of Charmian Clift
    McLean, E (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, 2022)
    In her 1959 memoir, Peel Me a Lotus, the expatriate Australian novelist and journalist Charmian Clift details her efforts to create and maintain a writers’ home on the Greek Island of Hydra. This involved the transformation of a pre-established structure that had fallen into a state of disrepair, into a space that was to be part-writer’s studio (for herself and her husband, George Johnston), and part-sanctuary for her family and their many visitors. While this dual functionality could be practically organized within the large structure of the Hydra house, the integral paradox of artistic production occurring in tandem with household maintenance instantiated a challenge for Clift, as she was expected to work simultaneously as writer, nurturer and housekeeper. In this essay I observe how Clift’s memoirs resultingly conjure a poetics of everyday life that minutely and honestly details and aestheticises the work of maintenance. Clift’s vision, which she describes as “my own bit of creation,” was one “of cleanliness and order and warmth and comfort.” Duly, housework—in both the abstract sense, of building and restoration, as well as in the more traditional sense, of housekeeping—receives sustained attention in Clift’s larger body of work. Clift’s memoirs are often absorbed in the details of domestic work performed both by her and by the local women living around her; these descriptions are devoted and artistic, in a way that shows women’s work to be too. Inspired by Mierle Laderman Ukeles’s Manifesto for Maintenance Art 1969!, this article discusses the relationship between maintenance and creativity that Clift problematises in the two memoirs she produced during the family’s period of living in Greece.
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    Rising Stars on AI
    Day, K ; MICHAEL, R ; Otmar, R ; Sharon, M ( 2023-11-22)
    How do the publishing industry’s rising stars feel about AI? Editors Rose Michael, Sharon Mullins, Renée Otmar and Katherine Day are interested in how AI tools might work, or be made to work, for editorial, wondering if ‘perhaps editors are situated to be necessary gatekeepers for how we will use and detect AI in the publishing workflow into the future’. They spoke to 2022 APA Rising Star winner Emily Hart, a former commissioning editor at Hardie Grant, now freelance, and Bianca Jafari, development editor at Thames & Hudson, who was shortlisted for the Rising Star award in 2021, about how they approach AI.
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    Alice Mustian, Playwright
    McInnis, D ; Steggle, M ; Teramura, M (Oxford University Press (OUP), 2023)
    This article provides the first full account of Alice Mustian, a Salisbury woman who in 1614 built a theatre in her backyard and charged an audience admission to watch a group of children perform a play that she had written about some salacious neighbourhood gossip. While the fact that this remarkable incident occurred is not unknown to scholars, the primary historical evidence about the event itself has remained largely unexamined. Drawing on unexplored ecclesiastical court records in the Wiltshire and Swindon History Centre, we offer a more complete picture of the performance, its complex social context, and the motivations of the parties involved. We locate it within the field of study of lost plays; we consider how it relates to other forms of theatre and performance culture in the period; and we discuss Mustian as a female dramatist whose play offers a tantalizing glimpse of the kinds of voices whose dramatic works may not have survived into the present.
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    Yes/No: Referenda and Mandates
    Cubitt, S ; Escobar Duenas, C ; Gook, B (Social Text Online, 2023-11-14)
    We are in the early stages of collaborative research into disaffection and cultural politics. Observing these referenda makes clear to us that passionate engagement and apathy are not polar opposites in the field of cultural politics. On the contrary, disaffection and rage are symptoms of the same estrangement from democratic norms. Rather than apply a model to these campaigns and results, we want to see what they can tell us about broader trends in contemporary political culture. We have however found some preliminary ways of thinking through the problem that may be helpful for others trying to work through similar challenges.
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    Deference and Diplomacy: Navigating Authors' Moral Rights in a Converged Literary Landscape
    Day, K (Common Ground Research Networks, 2023)
    Authors’ moral rights throughout history have been protected in various degrees across the globe: French law honors authors’ rights to their particular individual creative expression as supreme and perpetual; German law considers an author’s moral rights and economic rights in equal measure; in Australia, moral rights, though only recently codified, are not transferrable as they can be in the UK if waived. While the overarching Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works promises to protect the personality and reputation of authors, the literary landscape is now more diverse, with cross-platform entertainment streams expanding subsidiary rights opportunities in ways not anticipated even a decade ago. This paper explores how publishers and authors are currently navigating the publishing process post contract negotiations. Do authors defer to having their work manipulated to increase exposure or sales? Are publishers and editors successful negotiators and mediators of multiple uses of creative content and the authors who are inextricably tied to the work? Ultimately, where are the lines drawn when considering moral rights and opportunities in a converged literary landscape?
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    Multilingual negotiations: the place and significance of translation in multilingual poetry
    Niaz, N (The Observatory: Australian and Transnational Studies Centre, Universitat de Barcelona, 2021)
    Multilingual poetry, which weaves together multiple languages, necessarily straddles multiple cultural contexts. This raises the question of how poets who write multilingually negotiate and deploy their cultural knowledges, who they write for, and how their audiences receive them. Using Suresh Canagarajah’s Negotiation Model to examine poets’ linguistic choices, including whether and when to provide translations, and Mendieta-Lombardo and Cintron’s adaptation of the Myers-Scotton Markedness Model to consider audience and context, this paper will examine examples of contemporary bilingual and multilingual poetry published in Australia and Canada to identify the many conversations and negotiations that must take place between language-cultures as well as between multilingual poets and audiences for these poems to ‘work’.
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    This is us: pandemic storytelling, remembering and archiving by older Asian migrants in Victoria Photography and Video Exhibition
    Wang, WY ; Huang, TY (https://cocreating-covidsafe.com.au/exhibition, 2023)
    This is us: pandemic storytelling, remembering and archiving by older Asian migrants in Victoria Exhibition showcases the talents, emotions, stories and statements of older Asian migrants living throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. ​ Started as two successive studies on older Chinese, Sri Lankan and Indonesian migrants’ digital media use during Victoria’s lockdowns in 2020 & 2021, this Exhibition presents key outputs of the research and production projects over the past three years.​ The Exhibition offers a space of celebration, reflection and appreciation of some older members in our community, whose resilience and strength deserve our recognition & admiration.​