School of Culture and Communication - Research Publications

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    ‘Foreword: Otherwise than Conscious’ in Marie-Luise Angerer, Nonconscious: On the Affective Synching of Mind and Machine. Translated by Nicholas Grindell
    Cubitt, S ; Angerer, M-L (meson press, 2022)
    With Nonconscious, Marie-Luise Angerer, a leading figure in the international vanguard of thinkers working with affect, brings us a detailed map of the terrain traversed by affect theory since Whitehead, offering critiques and insights at every turn before presenting the vista perceivable from the heights of its convergence of feminist epistemology, science and technology studies, vitalist and actor-network ontologies, psychology and neuroscience.
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    Australian artists as rock art researchers: Percy Leason’s theories on cave art
    Lowish, S ; Tacon, P ; May, S ; Frederick, U ; McDonald, J (ANU Press, 2022-09-06)
    This paper sheds light on those non-Indigenous Australian artists who research rock art. The Australian tonal realist Percy Alexander Leason (1889-1959) made copies of rock paintings and the caves near Glenisla [or Glen Isla] for the National Museum of Victoria’s 1929 exhibition of Aboriginal art. Further studies of the Cave of the Serpent at Mount Langi Ghiran and of rock paintings in the Mootwingee range, New South Wales, inspired Leason to produce publications outlining his ideas. This paper reveals Leason’s contributions to rock art research, beginning with the model cave created for the 1929 exhibition, through his sketches, paintings and dioramas which illustrate his internationally recognised theories on cave art. The example of Leason foregrounds the existence of a much greater interest in rock art by Australian artists than has previously been imagined. So great is this interest that a new narrative of modern and contemporary Australian art can be written entirely based upon artistic engagement with rock art.
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    'Ransakid' by Death: Body, Soul and Image in Hoccleve's 'Learn to Die'
    Trigg, S ; Nuttall, J ; Watt, D (D. S. Brewer, 2022)
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    Making and Marketing Porcelain in Eighteenth-Century London
    Martin, M ; Garrioch, D (Brill, 2022)
    This volume moves away from the model of knowledge 'transfer' and, drawing on new understandings of artisan work, considers the links between artisan creativity and mobility.
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    Young children's haptic media habitus
    Nansen, B ; Green, L ; Holloway, D ; Stevenson, K ; Leaver, T ; Haddon, L (Routledge - Taylor & Francis, 2020-10-28)
    Young children’s engagement with digital media centres on their embodied relations, shaped with and through the interfaces, materiality, and mobility of tablets and smartphones. This chapter draws on ethnographic observation of young children’s mobile media practices in family homes to explore the embodied dimensions of digital media interfaces, while engaging with user interface and mobile app developer literature, and phenomenologically informed cultural theory. It reveals the emergence of a ‘haptic habitus’: the cultivation of embodied dispositions for touchscreen conduct and competence. Configured by both cultural and commercial operations, this habitus involves context, user interface studies, and the design of gestural input.
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    The postdigital playground: Children’s public play spaces in the smart city
    Nansen, B ; APPERLEY, T ; Leorke, D (Routledge, 2020)
    This chapter examines the integration of children’s public play spaces into the infrastructures of the smart city. While prior research has focused on personal mobile devices, this chapter examines deliberate design interventions that digitally augment children’s play spaces. Drawing on perspectives from children’s geography and game studies to conceptualise childhood play in the smart city, the chapter highlights the sometimes-contradictory relations that emerge. These contradictions arise in the smart city through the digital augmentation of spaces historically and culturally designated as play spaces. We introduce the notion of the postdigital to emphasise the blurring of boundaries of digital and nondigital play in children’s playgrounds and conceptualise the integration of playgrounds into digital infrastructures in relation to the broader impact that the smart city has on the uses of public space. This chapter explores this ongoing integration of playgrounds into the smart city through two recent examples of interactive play designs that digitally augment public playgrounds and parks: HybridPlay and Disney Fairy Trail. These examples of postdigital play in public playgrounds are analysed in terms of their functionality, representation and online reception. Operating along a broader trajectory of smart city infrastructures characterised by the blurring of discrete spaces of sociality, these examples of postdigital play highlight tensions associated with the cultural sensibilities and historical meanings attached to public play spaces, digital technologies and childhood.
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    Senses and Sensors of Sleep: Digital Mediation and Disconnection in Sleep Architectures
    Nansen, B ; Mannell, K ; O’Neill, C ; Jansson, A (Oxford University Press, 2021-01-01)

    This chapter analyzes sleep technology products designed to mediate and modulate patterns of sleep. Products analyzed include sleep-tracking applications and wearable devices for customizing personal phases of sleep architecture, and “smart” bedroom systems that use sensors and Internet connectivity to monitor and automate sensory environments to optimize the architectural spaces of sleep. Drawing on theories of digital disconnection, this chapter highlights how historical and theoretical notions of sleep as a site of subjective, social, and technological disconnection are reworked by contemporary media technologies. The now ubiquitous use of smartphones in bed reflects ongoing demands for digital participation and productivity. Yet such arrangements are unevenly distributed, with disconnective sleep technologies operating as a form of privilege and distinction for those who have the resources to reshape the architectures of personal sleep rhythms and spaces.

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    Automating Digital Afterlives
    Fordyce, R ; Nansen, B ; Arnold, M ; Kohn, T ; Gibbs, M ; Jansson, A ; Adams, PC (Oxford University Press, 2021-08-26)
    The question of how the dead “live on” by maintaining a presence and connecting to the living within social networks has garnered the attention of users, entrepreneurs, platforms, and researchers alike. In this chapter we investigate the increasingly ambiguous terrain of posthumous connection and disconnection by focusing on a diverse set of practices implemented by users and offered by commercial services to plan for and manage social media communication, connection, and presence after life. Drawing on theories of self-presentation (Goffman) and technological forms of life (Lash), we argue that moderated and automated performances of posthumous digital presence cannot be understood as a continuation of personal identity or self-presentation. Rather, as forms of mediated human (after)life, posthumous social media presence materializes ambiguities of connection/disconnection and self/identity.
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    Curating Dramaturgies
    Eckersall, P ; Ferdman, B ; Ekersall, P ; Ferdman, B (Routledge, 2021-04-27)
    This is further elaborated in the interviews with 15 diversely placed arts professionals who are at the forefront of rethinking and consolidatingthe ever-evolving field of the visual arts and performance.
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    Performance Community in an Age of Reenactment: Takao Kawaguchi’s About Kazuo Ohno and the Conversation with Ghosts
    Eckersall, P ; Fischer-Lichte, E ; Jost,, T (Routledge, 2021)
    Dramaturgies of Interweaving explores present-day dramaturgies that interweave performance cultures in the fields of theater, performance, dance, and other arts.