School of Culture and Communication - Research Publications

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    [Review of the book Photography in the Great War: The Ethics of Emerging Medical Collections from the Great War, by Jason Bate & the book Photographs and the Practice of History: A Short Primer, by Elizabeth Edwards]
    Maxwell, A (University of Chicago Press, 2024-06-01)
    This book review article presents a critical account of two very recent and important scholarly book publications related to the broad disciplinary field of the history of Photography The two books' differing foci and methologies are explained and related to their differing aims and uses.
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    Privilege or problem: The distinct role of government in arts development in South Australia
    Caust, J (ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2005-01-01)
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    Does it matter who is in charge? The influence of the business paradigm on arts leadership and management
    Caust, J (International Graduate School of Management, University of South Australia, 2005)
    Interpreting the 'arts as business' has become the mantra of the present time. Arts organisations are encouraged to be 'business like' in their operations with corporate style management structures and governance. This paper explores the development of this phenomenon in Australia in particular and questions the rationale for the approach as well as its impact. It does this within the context of a discussion about leadership and management of arts organisations and an exploration of the meaning of these terms in the arts. Finally, there is consideration of the core business of arts organisations and how that may be affected by the changing paradigm.
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    Does the art end when the management begins? The challenges of making ‘art’ for both artists and arts managers
    Caust, J (Arts & Cultural Management Program, University of South Australia, School of Management, 2010)
    The terms ‘leadership’ and ‘management’ can produce powerful and contradictory responses in the context of arts organisations. There are different expectations or understandings about the ‘construct of leadership’ and the ‘construct of management’ in the arts as elsewhere. It is argued that in arts organisations the ‘leadership’ is provided by the artistic director or artistic leader and the ‘management’ is provided by the administrator or general manager. But is this the case? Doesn’t the artistic director ‘manage’ and the general manager also ‘lead’? And what about everyone else in the organisation; the other artists, administrators and board members, do they contribute to the leadership and to the management of the organisation? In this paper it is argued that it is important for everyone involved in an arts organisation, to understand and take responsibility for its leadership and management, to ensure the organisation’s continued survival and success.
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    Arts and business: The impact of business models on the activities of major performing arts organisations in Australia
    Caust, J (University of Queensland, School of Languages and Comparative Cultural Studies, 2010)
    Managerial business models were first introduced to Australian subsidised performing arts organisations by the then Howard Coalition government in 2000. Until the early 1990s, Australian arts organisations were contextualised as 'not for profit' entities, with an overall objective of producing good art. Over the past decade, however, major Australian performing arts organisations have been viewed more frequently as part of an 'industry' and, within this industry construct, framed as 'business entities', with a need to prove positive financial outcomes as a first priority. This article explores what is meant by business models in the context of Australian major performing arts organisations and looks at the impact of this approach.
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    Festivals, artists and entrepreneurialism: the role of the Adelaide Fringe Festival
    Caust, J ; Glow, H (Griffith University, Australia, 2011)
    This paper addresses the role of the Adelaide Fringe Festival in facilitating entrepreneurialism amongst participating artists. Tracing the discursive development of the notion of the entrepreneur, the paper identifies how entrepreneurialism has been taken up by the discourses of the creative industries. While we note that entrepreneurialism is a key strategy within the creative industries framework, it would appear for artists the concept does not necessarily connote the achievement of commercial outcomes. The paper argues that these cultural entrepreneurs are defined by self-reliance, the focus on the development of their craft, and the cultural value of their work.
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    Cultural wars in an Australian context: challenges in developing a national cultural policy
    Caust, J (ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2015-03-15)
    In March 2013, the Australian Federal Labor Government released Creative Australia. This document was described as the first national Cultural Policy statement in 20 years since the publication by a previous Labor Government of Creative Nation in 1994. However, within 6 months of the launch of this new policy, a Coalition (Conservative) Federal government was elected in September 2013. Up till now, Coalition Governments have rejected the need for a national cultural policy, so the future for Creative Australia may in fact be both contested and limited. Indeed, during the previous Federal Coalition Government a ‘cultural war’ erupted between the government and artists and intellectuals, over the latter’s desire for an Australian cultural policy. This paper addresses questions around the process of developing this new national cultural policy, why it occurred, and what future it might have now there is a new Coalition Federal Government in power.
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    There is not one ideal model: Different governments and how they relate to the arts
    Caust, J (WSB University, 2018)
    There are many approaches to the arts by governments. Some governments take a ‘hands-off’ approach to the extent of providing no funding or institutional support. Others are deeply involved from conception to production with arts practice, providing funding but also expecting the right to intervene and control what occurs. Some governments see the provision of funding in transactional terms, expecting specific economic or social outcomes. Others say that they operate with an ‘arms-length’ model, but nevertheless demonstrate forms of intervention. Whatever the nature of the relationship, there are usually expectations by governments around their engagement with the arts. Using three case studies as exemplars of government approaches, this paper explores the nature of the relationship between art makers and government funders and reviews the potential impact of the different approaches on both organisations and their art practise.
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    Is UNESCO World Heritage recognition a blessing or burden? Evidence from developing Asian countries
    Caust, J ; Vecco, M (ELSEVIER FRANCE-EDITIONS SCIENTIFIQUES MEDICALES ELSEVIER, 2017-10)
    To both acknowledge and protect many cultural heritage expressions, sites and practices, UNESCO has instituted three conventions; Tangible Heritage, Intangible Heritage and Diversity of Cultural Expression. If a site/practice receives this UNESCO badge, it is an acknowledgment of its universal cultural and/or natural value as well as recognition of the need to protect it from harm. However, the UNESCO badge is an important marketing tool in world tourism and its presence ensures many more visitors to a site/practice that is UNESCO recognised. With increasing wealth and mobility, many more people are travelling than was possible even a decade ago. Increasing numbers of visitors can negatively impact on a site/practice as well as affect the local culture and integrity of a region, particularly in developing countries. So, is the UNESCO recognition a blessing or burden? This paper addresses the challenges that ensue from the UNESCO conventions by considering three UNESCO World Heritage case study sites in Asian developing countries. In particular, it seeks to understand the extent to which UNESCO's World Heritage approach protects or further undermines the cultural heritage sustainability of these sites.