School of Culture and Communication - Research Publications

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    Gender, Mobility Regimes, and Social Transformation in Asia
    Martin, F ; Dragojlovic, A (Taylor & Francis (Routledge), 2019)
    This special issue, which grows out of an international symposium that the editors hosted at the University of Melbourne in November 2016...
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    墨尔本的中国留学生与社交媒体的移动场景 Chinese students and social media mobile scenes in Melbourne
    Martin, F (Shanghai University Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies, 2019-09-16)
    When most participants use mobile social media in their daily lives, national and ethnical issues are downplayed by their local (or more accurately, cross-regional) focus on absorption: micro-level physical and emotional textures, and the feeling of a particular place where one is located or remembered continues to connect Melbourne and home. The status update of social media is lively, because it is full of specific, daily, homesickness aroused by a hoe, the melancholy of the golden leaves in the night light, a friend, a cup of coffee, a cloud , A melody, a blurry view outside the city window in memory. If we can see this as a form of digital citizenship, then it is not so much an abstract entity under the category of a state as a network of multiple societies and a sense of belonging (and a sense of alienation). Digital social media mobile scenarios, in most cases, completely bypass the country, linking everyday, personal local experiences with culture at the transnational level. This conceptualization of cross-local digital ownership may help us rethink the relationship between citizens, places, mobility, subjectivity, and cities, which I think is very urgent for our time. 大多数参与者在日常生活中使用移动社交媒体时,民族、国家的问题都因 其对地方的 ( 或者更准确地说,跨地方的 ) 专注吸纳而被淡化了:微观层面的物 质和情感纹理,以及一个人所处或者所忆的特定地方的感觉不断延伸,将墨尔 本和家乡连接到一起。社交媒体的状态更新是鲜活的,因为其中充满了具体的、 日常的、因一个馒头而激起的思乡之情,金色的叶子在夜光中唤起的忧郁,一 个朋友,一杯咖啡,一朵云彩,一曲旋律,一片记忆中城市窗外的模糊景色。 如果我们能把这看作是一种数字公民的形式,那么,与其说这是一个国家范畴 下的抽象实体,不如说是一个由多重社会和空间归属感 ( 以及疏离感 ) 构成的网 络。数字社交媒体的移动场景在大多数情况下完全绕开国家,将日常的、切身 的地方体验与跨国层面的文化联系起来。这种对跨地方数字归属的概念化或许 可以帮助我们重新思考公民、地方、流动性、主体性以及城市之间的关系,我 认为这对我们的时代而言是非常紧迫的。
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    (Im)mobile precarity in the Asia-Pacific
    Martin, F ; Erni, JN ; Yue, A (ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2019-11-02)
    If on a global scale, our late-modern era is marked by intensifying mobilities of many kinds, then Asia as a geo-cultural region exemplifies this trend in particularly forceful ways, with large mobile populations including permanent migrants, refugees, international students, labour migrants, young travelers, as well as well-developed cross-border networks of mobile media technologies, products, talents, and finances. Our starting point in this article is the idea that these intensified mobilities sketched are transforming people’s experiences of everyday life and subjectivity in Asia and beyond. The increased regionwide ‘mobilisation’ of economic, social and cultural life seems likely to transform people’s senses of place and movement; experiences of labour; everyday affective and embodied sense of self; gendered, sexed, raced and classed subjectivities; visual and media cultures; youth cultures; cultures of consumption, and more. This raises a plethora of theoretical and empirical questions for a regionally focussed cultural studies. How frictionless are these intensifying flows: which borders and blockages mould the new, transnational experiential geographies that are taking shape? Which populations are advantaged by increased mobility, and which minoritised? What new inequalities emerge as a result of intensifying mobilities–and how do people live with, resist, and creatively negotiate these inequalities at the micro-level of everyday practice? And what will ‘Asia’ come to mean in the emergent reconfigurations of place, geography and identity being wrought by intensifying mobilities? In order to lay the conceptual groundwork for the special issue, this article begins by tracing the interconnections between three of our key terms–(im)mobilities, precarities, and borders–in conversation with the relevant theoretical scholarship on these concepts across a range of disciplinary fields. This leads to the theorisation of a new concept that articulates these connections: (im)mobile precarity.
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    Why universities should invest more to support Chinese students
    Martin, F (The Asia Society Australia, 2019-12-03)
    Providing adequate services to support Chinese students would benefit not only them but all students at Australian universities, raising the quality of education and fostering cross-cultural engagement.
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    Introduction: Australia in the field of trans-Asian media flows
    Khoo, O ; Martin, F ; Yue, A (SAGE Publications, 2020-02-22)
    Although it has long been considered a non-Asian country located in Asia, Australia is increasingly linked to Asian media circuits, and the rise of the Asian media industries is changing Australian media culture. At the level of consumption, Asian media content – from Bollywood film to Japanese TV to Chinese online video to Korean social media and K-pop – is now more readily accessible than ever to media users in Australia due to broadband connectivity and mobile media technologies, as well as (more unevenly) via mainstream commercial distribution. This increased access is not only helping Australia’s Asian migrant populations maintain cultural ties; it is also creating new media tastes for the general Australian audience. Meanwhile, at the level of production, Australian governments, keen to harness the potential for the country’s involvement in the region’s expanding media industries, are exploring new ways to support Australia’s screen media industries by establishing regional partnerships. This Special Issue of Media International Australia grows out of a collaborative research project funded by the Australian Research Council to explore the cultural and industrial implications of these unfolding developments. It seeks to understand how these intensifying media flows across Asia, and including Australia, are transforming the cultural identities of Australian audiences and media products.
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    Comparing sexual behaviours and knowledge between domestic students and Chinese international students in Australia: findings from two cross-sectional studies
    Douglass, CH ; Qin, C ; Martin, F ; Xiao, Y ; El-Hayek, C ; Lim, MSC (SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD, 2020-06-03)
    Few studies investigate sexual health among Chinese international students in Australia. We recruited domestic (n = 623) and Chinese international (n = 500) students for separate online surveys on sexual behaviours and knowledge. Samples were compared using Chi square, Fisher's exact and equality of medians tests. Domestic students were more likely than international students to have ever touched a partner's genitals (81% vs. 53%, p < 0.01), had oral sex (76% vs. 44%, p < 0.01), vaginal intercourse (67% vs. 41%, p < 0.01) and anal intercourse (31% vs. 6%, p < 0.01). Domestic students were younger when they first touched a partner's genitals (16 vs. 18 years, p < 0.01), had oral sex (17 vs. 18 years, p < 0.01) and vaginal intercourse (17 vs. 18 years, p < 0.01). Domestic students were less likely than Chinese international students to report only one lifetime partner for touching genitals (22% vs. 50%, p < 0.01), oral sex (25% vs. 55%, p < 0.01), vaginal intercourse (30% vs. 58%, p < 0.01) and anal intercourse (54% vs. 88%, p < 0.01). Domestic students were more likely than Chinese international students to use the oral contraceptive pill (48% vs. 16%, p < 0.01) and long-acting reversible contraceptives (19% vs. 1%, p < 0.01). Domestic students scored higher than international students on a contraception and chlamydia quiz (4/5 vs. 2/5, p < 0.01). Domestic and Chinese international students differed in sexual behaviours and knowledge highlighting the need for relevant sexual health promotion for both groups.
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    Time to reset Australian international education
    Martin, F (Crawford Centre for Public Policy, ANU, 2020-06-10)
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    Transcultural media practices fostering cosmopolitan ethos in a digital age: engagements with East Asian media in Australia
    Martin, F ; Iwabuchi, K ; Gassin, G ; Seto, W (ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2020-01-02)
    The increasingly transnational reach of East Asian media suggests that East Asia has become an ever more de-territorialized media zone. But what has been relatively neglected in the extant scholarship is in-depth consideration of how East Asian media culture has been transnationalised beyond the geographic boundaries of Asia, especially in the context of accelerating online content distribution. In this article, we propose that Australia provides a useful case study to illuminate the cultural impacts of East Asian media beyond Asia. What is Australia’s place in trans-Asia media circuits? Does the consumption of East Asian media by audiences in Australia enable them to develop increasingly reflexive understandings of cultural identity, in a turn toward everyday cosmopolitanism?