Nursing - Research Publications

Permanent URI for this collection

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 34
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Safewards: An integrative review of the literature within inpatient and forensic mental health units.
    Mullen, A ; Browne, G ; Hamilton, B ; Skinner, S ; Happell, B (Wiley, 2022-10)
    Mental health inpatient units are complex and challenging environments for care and treatment. Two imperatives in these settings are to minimize restrictive practices such as seclusion and restraint and to provide recovery-oriented care. Safewards is a model and a set of ten interventions aiming to improve safety by understanding the relationship between conflict and containment as a means of reducing restrictive practices. To date, the research into Safewards has largely focused on its impact on measures of restrictive practices with limited exploration of consumer perspectives. There is a need to review the current knowledge and understanding around Safewards and its impact on consumer safety. This paper describes a mixed-methods integrative literature review of Safewards within inpatient and forensic mental health units. The aim of this review was to synthesize the current knowledge and understanding about Safewards in terms of its implementation, acceptability, effectiveness and how it meets the needs of consumers. A systematic database search using Medline, CINAHL, Embase and PsychInfo databases was followed by screening and data extraction of findings from 19 articles. The Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool (MMAT) was used to assess the quality of empirical articles, and the Johanna Brigg's Institute (JBI's) Narrative, Opinion, Text-Assessment and Review Instrument (NOTARI) was used to undertake a critical appraisal of discussion articles. A constant comparative approach was taken to analysing the data and six key categories were identified: training, implementation strategy, staff acceptability, fidelity, effectiveness and consumer perspectives. The success of implementing Safewards was variously determined by a measured reduction of restrictive practices and conflict events, high fidelity and staff acceptability. The results highlighted that Safewards can be effective in reducing containment and conflict within inpatient mental health and forensic mental health units, although this outcome varied across the literature. This review also revealed the limitations of fidelity measures and the importance of involving staff in the implementation. A major gap in the literature to date is the lack of consumer perspectives on the Safewards model, with only two papers to date focusing on the consumers point of view. This is an important area that requires more research to align the Safewards model with the consumer experience and improved recovery orientation.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Action learning sets for supporting postgraduate mental health nurses' transition to professional practice: A qualitative study
    Hopkins, JF ; Hamilton, BE ; Prematunga, RK ; Ennis, G ; Fairest, K ; Houghton, J (WILEY, 2021-02-17)
    This paper reports on a qualitative case study of postgraduate mental health nurses participating in a monthly facilitated action learning set (ALS) in order to support them while they transition from PGMHN to independent professional practice. The aim of the study was to determine what the impact of participating in an ALS would have on how they perceived clinical practice issues. The ALS comprised a small group of PGMHN supported by a facilitator in order to explore issues from clinical practice by using Socratic questions to challenge their thinking. Data were collected via a single focus group and a 20-item survey. Focus group textual data were coded line by line, and codes were synthesized thematically. The major theme to emerge from the qualitative results was as follows: 'Learning from doing an action learning set'. Three subthemes were identified: Think outside the box: Developing Socratic questions; there's rarely one right way: Applying action learning to practice; and Not easy to implement: Action plans in action. A 20-item evaluative survey indicated that ALS increased participant's confidence as a mental health nurse. Using critical questions increased participants' confidence to explore different perspectives when engaged in problem-solving.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Contextual Barriers and Enablers to Safewards Implementation in Victoria, Australia: Application of the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research.
    Fletcher, J ; Brophy, L ; Pirkis, J ; Hamilton, B (Frontiers Media SA, 2021)
    Background: Safewards is a complex psychosocial intervention designed to reduce conflict and containment on inpatient mental health units. There is mounting international evidence of the effectiveness and acceptability of Safewards. However, a significant challenge exists in promising interventions, such as Safewards, being translated into routine practice. The Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) provides a framework through which to understand implementation in complex health service environments. The aim was to inform more effective implementation of Safewards using the CFIR domains and constructs, capitalizing on developing an understanding of variations across wards. Method: Seven Safewards Leads completed the Training and Implementation Diary for 18 wards that opted in to a trial of Safewards. Fidelity Checklist scores were used to categorize low, medium and high implementers of Safewards at the end of the 12-week implementation period. Results: Qualitative data from the diaries were analyzed thematically and coded according to the five CFIR domains which included 39 constructs. Twenty-six constructs across the five domains were highlighted within the data to have acted as a barrier or enabler. Further analysis revealed that six constructs distinguished between low, medium, and high implementing wards. Discussion: Our findings suggest that for implementation of Safewards to succeed, particular attention needs to be paid to engagement of key staff including managers, making training a priority for all ward staff, adequate planning of the process of implementation and creating an environment on each inpatient unit that prioritize and enables Safewards interventions to be undertaken by staff regularly.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Outcomes of the Victorian Safewards trial in 13 wards: Impact on seclusion rates and fidelity measurement
    Fletcher, J ; Spittal, M ; Brophy, L ; Tibble, H ; Kinner, S ; Elsom, S ; Hamilton, B (WILEY, 2017-10-01)
    Restrictive practices are used in response to conflict and aggression in psychiatric inpatient settings. Reducing such practices is the focus internationally of policy and legislative change, many initiatives, and a growing body of research. Safewards is a model and a set of 10 interventions designed to reduce conflict and containment in inpatient services. In the current study, we aimed to assess the impact of implementing Safewards on seclusion in Victorian inpatient mental health services in Australia. The study used a before-and-after design, with a comparison group matched for service type. Thirteen wards opted into a 12-week trial to implement Safewards and 1-year follow up. The comparison group was all other wards (n = 31) with seclusion facilities in the jurisdiction, matched to service type. Mandatorily-reported seclusion event data for all 44 wards over a 15-month period were analysed using negative binomial regression. Adherence to Safewards was measured via fidelity checklists at four time points: twice during the trial, post-trial, and at 1-year follow up. Seclusion rates were reduced by 36% in Safewards trial wards by the 12-month follow-up period (incidence rate ratios (IRR) = 0.64,) but in the comparison wards seclusion rates did not differ from baseline to post-trial (IRR = 1.17) or to follow-up period (IRR = 1.35). Fidelity analysis revealed a trajectory of increased use of Safewards interventions after the trial phase to follow up. The findings suggest that Safewards is appropriate for practice change in Victorian inpatient mental health services more broadly than adult acute wards, and is effective in reducing the use of seclusion.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Nurses' shift reports: a systematic literature search and critical review of qualitative field studies
    Buus, N ; Hoeck, B ; Hamilton, BE (WILEY, 2017-10-01)
    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To identify reporting practices that feature in studies of nurses' shift reports across diverse nursing specialities. The objectives were to perform an exhaustive systematic literature search and to critically review the quality and findings of qualitative field studies of nurses' shift reports. BACKGROUND: Nurses' shift reports are routine occurrences in healthcare organisations that are viewed as crucial for patient outcomes, patient safety and continuity of care. Studies of communication between nurses attend primarily to 1:1 communication and analyse the adequacy and accuracy of patient information and feature handovers at the bedside. Still, verbal reports between groups of nurses about patients are commonplace. Shift reports are obvious sites for studying the situated accomplishment of professional nursing at the group level. This review is focused exclusively on qualitative field research for nuanced and contextualised insights into nurses' everyday shift reporting practices. DESIGN: The study is a systematic literature search and critical review of qualitative field analyses of nurses' shift reports. We searched in the databases CIHAHL, PubMed and PsycINFO and identified and reviewed 19 articles published 1992-2014. Data were systematically extracted using criteria for the evaluation of qualitative research reports. RESULTS: The studies described shift report practices and identified several factors contributing to distribution of clinical knowledge. Shift report practices were described as highly conventionalised and locally situated, but with occasional opportunities for improvisation and negotiation between nurses. Finally, shift reports were described as multifunctional meetings, with individual and social effects for nurses and teams. CONCLUSION: Innovations in between-shift communications can benefit from this analysis, by providing for the many functions of handovers that are revealed in field studies. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Leaders and practising nurses may consider what are the best opportunities for nurses to work up clinical knowledge and negotiate care.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Interventions to improve patient understanding of cancer clinical trial participation: a systematic review
    Kao, CY ; Aranda, S ; Krishnasamy, M ; Hamilton, B (WILEY, 2017-03-01)
    Patient misunderstanding of cancer clinical trial participation is identified as a critical issue and researchers have developed and tested a variety of interventions to improve patient understanding. This systematic review identified nine papers published between 2000 and 2013, to evaluate the effects of interventions to improve patient understanding of cancer clinical trial participation. Types of interventions included audio-visual information, revised written information and a communication training workshop. Interventions were conducted alone or in combination with other forms of information provision. The nine papers, all with methodological limitations, reported mixed effects on a small range of outcomes regarding improved patient understanding of cancer clinical trial participation. The methodological limitations included: (1) the intervention development process was poorly described; (2) only a small element of the communication process was addressed; (3) studies lacked evidence regarding what information is essential and critical to enable informed consent; (4) studies lacked reliable and valid outcome measures to show that patients are sufficiently informed to provide consent; and (5) the intervention development process lacked a theoretical framework. Future research needs to consider these factors when developing interventions to improve communication and patient understanding during the informed consent process.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Development of competence in the first year of graduate nursing practice: a longitudinal study
    Lima, S ; Newall, F ; Jordan, HL ; Hamilton, B ; Kinney, S (WILEY, 2016-04-01)
    AIM: To determine the extent to which competence develops in the first year of nursing practice in a paediatric setting. BACKGROUND: Among all the literature related to nursing competence, there have been few studies that have used a standardized tool to determine the development of professional nursing competence in the first year of practice. DESIGN: A quantitative longitudinal design was applied as part of a mixed methods study. METHODS: Forty seven nurses commencing a 12-month graduate nurse programme were invited to undertake a self-assessment of their level of competence at four time points; commencement, 3 months, 6 months and 12 months, between January 2013-February 2014. The assessment was completed using the Nurse Competence Scale; a questionnaire with 73 items across seven domains of competence. Each item is scored along a visual analogue scale (0-100). Response rates varied from 100% at commencement to 68% at 12 months. RESULTS: At commencement, the self-assessed level of overall competence was 41·4, 61·1 at 3 months, 72·9 at 6 months and 76·7 at 12 months. Similar patterns were seen for each domain. Mixed effects model analysis for longitudinal data revealed gains in competence for each of the domains and overall, was statistically significant from commencement to 3 months and 3 months to 6 months. While gains were made between 6-12 months, the results were not statistically significant. CONCLUSION: Graduate nurses showed significant gains in competence in the first 6 months of transition from nursing students to Registered Nurses.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Subjective Experiences of Mental Health Crisis Care in Emergency Departments: A Narrative Review of the Qualitative Literature
    Roennfeldt, H ; Wyder, M ; Byrne, L ; Hill, N ; Randall, R ; Hamilton, B (MDPI, 2021-09-01)
    Mental health presentations to the emergency department (ED) have increased, and the emergency department has become the initial contact point for people in a mental health crisis. However, there is mounting evidence that the ED is not appropriate nor effective in responding to people in mental health crises. Insufficient attention has been paid to the subjective experience of people seeking support during a mental health crisis. This review aims to describe the qualitative literature involving the subjective experiences of people presenting to the ED during a mental health crisis. The method was guided by Arksey and O'Malley's framework for scoping studies and included keyword searches of PsycINFO, CINAHL, Medline and Embase. A narrative analysis, drawing on the visual tool of journey mapping, was applied to summarise the findings. Twenty-three studies were included. The findings represent the experience of accessing EDs, through to the impact of treatment. The review found points of opportunity that improve people's experiences and characteristics associated with negative experiences. The findings highlight the predominance and impact of negative experiences of the ED and the incongruence between the expectations of people presenting to the ED and the experience of treatment.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Design features that reduce the use of seclusion and restraint in mental health facilities: a rapid systematic review
    Oostermeijer, S ; Brasier, C ; Harvey, C ; Hamilton, B ; Roper, C ; Martel, A ; Fletcher, J ; Brophy, L (BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP, 2021-01-01)
    UNLABELLED: Increasing efforts are being made to prevent and/or eliminate the use of seclusion and restraint in mental health facilities. Recent literature recognises the importance of the physical environment in supporting better outcomes in mental health services. This rapid review scoped the existing literature studying what physical design features of mental health facilities can reduce the use of seclusion and physical restraint. DESIGN: A rapid review of peer-reviewed literature. METHODS: Peer-reviewed literature was searched for studies on architectural design and the use of restraint and seclusion in mental health facilities. The following academic databases were searched: Cochrane Library, Medline, PsycINFO, Scopus and Avery for English language literature published between January 2010 and August 2019. The Joanna Briggs Institute's critical appraisal tool was used to assess the quality of included studies. RESULTS: We identified 35 peer-reviewed studies. The findings revealed several overarching themes in design efforts to reduce the use of seclusion and restraint: a beneficial physical environment (eg, access to gardens or recreational facilities); sensory or comfort rooms; and private, uncrowded and calm spaces. The critical appraisal indicated that the overall quality of studies was low, as such the findings should be interpreted with caution. CONCLUSION: This study found preliminary evidence that the physical environment has a role in supporting the reduction in the use of seclusion and restraint. This is likely to be achieved through a multilayered approach, founded on good design features and building towards specific design features which may reduce occurrences of seclusion and restraint. Future designs should include consumers in a codesign process to maximise the potential for change and innovation that is genuinely guided by the insights of lived experience expertise.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    The unheard voice of the clinician: Perspectives on the key features of an adolescent inpatient model of care
    Hayes, C ; Simmons, M ; Palmer, VJ ; Hamilton, B ; Simons, C ; Hopwood, M (WILEY, 2019-08-01)
    PROBLEM: Little has been reported from clinicians about the operations, interventions, and outcomes of inpatient units and how these comprise models of care in such units. The aim of this study was to explore an inpatient model of care in operation at the study site by defining key features of the model from the perspectives of clinicians. METHODS: Semi-structured face to face interviews were conducted with ten clinicians working in a private inpatient unit in Melbourne, Australia. Interview data were analyzed using thematic analysis. FINDINGS: Analysis resulted in the identification of three thematic features relating to containment, engagement, and therapy. These included (a) an environment conducive to containment, (b) adolescent engagement through shared experiences, and (c) dialectical behavior therapy embedded culture. CONCLUSIONS: The findings provide insights into often unheard clinician perspectives on what the key features of an adolescent inpatient model of care are. These features relate to the interventions that are currently offered on the unit and ways of working as informed by philosophies and practices. These findings should be used to improve clinical services and inform research aiming to articulate exemplary adolescent inpatient models of care. Furthermore, the findings provide guidance and practical information to commissioners, clinicians, and policy makers implementing models of care.