Nursing - Research Publications

Permanent URI for this collection

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 16
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Predictors of Life Satisfaction in New Zealand: Analysis of a National Dataset
    Jarden, RJ ; Joshanloo, M ; Weijers, D ; Sandham, MH ; Jarden, AJ (MDPI, 2022-05-01)
    The study aim was to determine prevalence and predictors of life satisfaction in New Zealand. In this observational cross-sectional study, a sample of 10,799 participants from NZ were drawn from the Gallup World Poll from 2006 to 2017. Data were analysed using regression analysis and ANOVA. Prevalence of life satisfaction across time varied little from a high of 7.61 (SD = 1.6) in 2007 to a low of 7.23 (SD = 1.73) in 2011 (range 0-10). Satisfaction with standards of living predicted life satisfaction regardless of age or gender. For males across all age groups and females up to age 40 years, positive experiences and satisfaction with household income were important predictors. Being married was an important predictor for males over 40 years and feeling satisfied with their current city was important for females across all ages and for men under 40. The levels of life satisfaction changed over time, possibly due to major national events. Satisfaction with standards of living was found to predict life satisfaction regardless of age or gender. These results provide a path for policy focus towards increased life satisfaction.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    An Evaluation of the Psychometric Properties of the Temporal Satisfaction With Life Scale
    Guitard, J ; Jarden, A ; Jarden, R ; Lajoie, D (FRONTIERS MEDIA SA, 2022-04-14)
    The Temporal Satisfaction with Life Scale measures judgements of life satisfaction using 15 items, according to three temporal dimensions: past, present, and future. However, only seven studies have looked at the psychometric properties of the Temporal Satisfaction with Life Scale, and this has been individually across vastly different countries and cultures (Canada, China, Germany, Spain, Switzerland, Turkey, and United-States), and with different populations, such as undergraduate students, adults, and older adults. In addition, these studies have highlighted issues regarding the replicability of the validity of the scale structure and optimal number of items. In this study we use a large international and multicultural sample (n = 6,912) from the International Wellbeing Study and investigate the scale structure of the Temporal Satisfaction with Life Scale, resulting in the recommendation that a shortened 12-item version provides a better model fit compared to the original 15-item version. More in-depth correlates with aspects of wellbeing and illbeing, in relation to past, present, and future life satisfaction, are also presented than have been previously, which found positive correlations between the temporal dimensions of the Temporal Satisfaction with Life Scale and wellbeing, as well as negative correlations with illbeing measures.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Doing Case Study Research Collaboratively: The Benefits for Researchers
    Mcclunie-Trust, P ; Jones, V ; Winnington, R ; Shannon, K ; Donaldson, AE ; Macdiarmid, R ; Jarden, RJ ; Turner, R ; Merrick, E ; Andersen, P (SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC, 2022-04-01)
    Collaborative research teams are an effective strategy to combine the knowledge and skills of like-minded researchers across tertiary education settings and international borders. Research collaborations have the potential to increase research capacity for both individuals and the team alike. The purpose of the study was to explore the experiences and perceptions of a team of seven Australasian nurse academics undertaking a longitudinal multi-site case study. We used a nominal group technique in this deductive qualitative exploratory study. The key findings from this study indicate establishing safe academic relationships is paramount to successful collaborative teams. Collaborative research teams offer opportunities to learn research processes from other members through sharing of expertise and skillsets, together with upholding a positive engagement with technology to ensure full research participation is achievable irrespective of geographical location. To conclude, in this study we have identified multi-site collaborative research teams provide an opportunity to leverage the strengths of individuals to enhance research outcomes across organisations. The synergistic effect of the team builds research blue skies thinking and capacity building through mentorship and support. The potential for positive change through mentorship and support, alongside the forged new relationships, are all key drivers of researcher wellbeing, never more important as we transition into new ways of working both now and into the future.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Advancing Nursing Informatics Through Clinical Placements: Pilot Study.
    Lokmic-Tomkins, Z ; Brar, S ; Lin, N ; Khor, M ; Mathews, K ; Lawlor, K (IOS Press, 2021-12-15)
    Work integrated learning in the space of nursing informatics is a new concept in Australian nursing curriculum. This study examined nursing students' experiences in the pilot nursing informatics clinical placement centered on electronic medical records, their use in patient care and clinical decision making. Students completed reflective diaries of their learning during the four-week placement. Data was explored by thematic analysis. Emergent themes included: importance of adequate training in using EMR; impact of EMR on nursing workflow and patient care; shaping future career choices; forming rewarding relationships; and potential for improvements. These themes will be used to enhance teaching and learning opportunities as this pilot placement evolves into permeant part of the nursing curriculum.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Methodological approaches to measuring the incidence of unplanned emergency department presentations by cancer patients receiving systemic anti-cancer therapy: a systematic review
    Dufton, PH ; Gerdtz, MF ; Jarden, R ; Krishnasamy, M (BMC, 2022-03-21)
    BACKGROUND: The need to mitigate the volume of unplanned emergency department (ED) presentations is a priority for health systems globally. Current evidence on the incidence and risk factors associated with unplanned ED presentations is unclear because of substantial heterogeneity in methods reporting on this issue. The aim of this review was to examine the methodological approaches to measure the incidence of unplanned ED presentations by patients receiving systemic anti-cancer therapy in order to determine the strength of evidence and to inform future research. METHODS: An electronic search of Medline, Embase, CINAHL, and Cochrane was undertaken. Papers published in English language between 2000 and 2019, and papers that included patients receiving systemic anti-cancer therapy as the denominator during the study period were included. Studies were eligible if they were analytical observational studies. Data relating to the methods used to measure the incidence of ED presentations by patients receiving systemic anti-cancer therapy were extracted and assessed for methodological rigor. Findings are reported in accordance with the Synthesis Without Meta-Analysis (SWiM) guideline. RESULTS: Twenty-one articles met the inclusion criteria: 20 cohort studies, and one cross-sectional study. Overall risk of bias was moderate. There was substantial methodological and clinical heterogeneity in the papers included. Methodological rigor varied based on the description of methods such as the period of observation, loss to follow-up, reason for ED presentation and statistical methods to control for time varying events and potential confounders. CONCLUSIONS: There is considerable diversity in the population and methods used in studies that measure the incidence of unplanned ED presentations by patients receiving systemic anti-cancer therapy. Recommendations to support the development of robust evidence include enrolling participants at diagnosis or initiation of treatment, providing adequate description of regular care to support patients who experience toxicities, reporting reasons for and characteristics of participants who are lost to follow-up throughout the study period, clearly defining the outcome including the observation and follow-up period, and reporting crude numbers of ED presentations and the number of at-risk days to account for variation in the length of treatment protocols.
  • Item
    No Preview Available
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    The Palgrave Handbook of Positive Education
    Jarden, A ; Jarden, R ; Chin, T ; Kern, M ; Kern, ML ; Wehmeyer, ML (Springer International Publishing, 2021)
    This open access handbook provides a comprehensive overview of the growing field of positive education, featuring a broad range of theoretical, applied, and practice-focused chapters from leading international experts.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Assessing Wellbeing in School Communities
    Jarden, A ; Jarden, R ; Chin, T-C ; Kern, ML ; Kern, ML ; Wehmeyer, ML (Springer International Publishing, 2021)
    Abstract This chapter summarizes the essentials of assessment, principles of good assessment, and wellbeing assessment in the context of school communities. Drawing from positive education initiatives, what wellbeing assessments in schools look like, and why they are important is outlined and discussed. Examples of good assessment tools and their use in practice are explored. The chapter further focuses on the content, processes, and systems involved in assessment, before addressing the use of assessment data in decision-making and providing examples of good assessment in practice. The chapter ends by highlighting questions schools and decision-makers may draw from in choosing and developing assessment tools and approaches for their unique school community.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    What Motivates People to Start a Graduate Entry Nursing Programme: An Interpretive Multi-Centred Case Study
    Macdiarmid, R ; McClunie-Trust, P ; Shannon, K ; Winnnington, R ; E. Donaldson, A ; Jarden, RJ ; Lamdin-Hunter, R ; Merrick, E ; Turner, R ; Jones, V (SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC, 2021-04-01)
    INTRODUCTION: While graduate entry nursing programmes are well established in the United Kingdom and the United States of America (USA), they are relatively new to New Zealand and Australia. These programmes have been developed to meet the demands of the health workforce and provide graduates an alternative pathway to becoming a RN. Nursing is viewed as an attractive career option for this growing market of graduate entry students. OBJECTIVE: This study explored the motivations underpinning students choosing a graduate entry MNSc degree over a traditional undergraduate nursing programme. METHODS: A qualitative, longitudinal single case study design, informed by Yin was used. The first phase of the study is reported here. All students commencing a MNSc degree at the beginning of 2020 across four education providers (3 in New Zealand & 1 in Australia) were eligible to take part in the study. Ten students agreed to take part and undertake an interview. Braun and Clarke's approach to thematic analysis was used to analyse the interview data. RESULTS: Three key themes of motivation were identified from the data: the attraction of nursing; the clarity nursing offers in terms of career progression; and the design of the intensive programme. CONCLUSIONS: The motivations to choose a MNSc degree were deeply considered, multifaceted, and influenced by nursing role models. Students wanting to engage with a graduate entry MNSc programme did so through a reflective process of assessing their current career status and future career values. Participants in this study believed nursing would provide a secure and sustainable career path, potentially creating new horizons or possibilities beyond their previous work and life experiences. Having insight into what motivates individuals to enrol in such programmes may assist both education providers and the health sector with RN graduate recruitment and graduate entry programme enrolment.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Registered Nurses' experiences of psychological well-being and ill-being in their first year of practice: A qualitative meta-synthesis
    Jarden, RJ ; Jarden, A ; Weiland, TJ ; Taylor, G ; Brockenshire, N ; Gerdtz, M (WILEY, 2020-12-12)
    AIM: To synthesize Registered Nurses' self-reported perceptions and experiences of psychological well-being and ill-being during their first year of practice. DESIGN: Qualitative meta-synthesis. DATA SOURCES: Databases included Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Excerpta Medica database, Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online and Psychological Information. Qualitative studies were considered for inclusion if published in English, from 2009-2019, reporting primary data analysis including psychological well-being and ill-being experiences of graduate nurses in first year of practice. REVIEW METHODS: Qualitative studies were systematically identified and critically appraised. A meta-synthesis was applied using an open card sort technique to organize empirical data into a matrix of graduate nurses' voices of psychological well-being and ill-being. RESULTS: Twenty-two studies were included. Analysis revealed patterns of positive experiences and emotions. These included feeling valued and part of the team and learning from and feeling supported by other nurses. Negative experiences and emotions such as feeling overwhelmed, stressed, alone and inadequately prepared were also identified. CONCLUSION: Graduate nurses' perceptions and experiences of their psychological well-being and ill-being revealed both positive and negative dimensions during this transition period. Specific examples of strategies that may promote transition nurses' well-being and prevent ill-being were identified such as social connection and support. IMPACT: Increasing the numbers of new nursing graduates world-wide is required to strengthen health systems. Developing strategies to retain these graduates in the workforce is paramount. This review found some graduate nurses experience the transition period as a time of personal growth and fulfilment, for others this period was a stressor. These findings were illustrated in a model of 'ways to well-being'. The potential for knowledge translation of this model extends from graduate nurses as individuals, to nurse entry to practice programs and graduate nurse programs, to organizational policy targeting future health workforce. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42020148812.