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    An evaluation of the psychometric properties of the Fear of COVID-19 Scale in a sample of help-seeking men
    Rice, SM ; Trail, K ; Walton, CC ; Kealy, D ; Seidler, ZE ; Wilson, MJ ; Oliffe, JL ; Ogrodniczuk, JS (Komitet Redakcyjno - Wydawniczy Polskiego Towarzystwa Psychiatrycznego, 2022-03-01)
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    Suicide amongst young Inuit males: The perspectives of Inuit health and wellness workers in Nunavik
    Affleck, W ; Oliffe, JL ; Inukpuk, MM ; Tempier, R ; Darroch, F ; Crawford, A ; Séguin, M (Elsevier BV, 2022-12)
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    Masculinity and mental illness in and after men's intimate partner relationships
    Oliffe, JL ; Kelly, MT ; Montaner, GG ; Seidler, ZE ; Ogrodniczuk, JS ; Rice, SM (Elsevier BV, 2022-12)
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    Widening mental health and substance use inequities among sexual and gender minority populations: Findings from a repeated cross-sectional monitoring survey during the COVID-19 pandemic in Canada.
    Slemon, A ; Richardson, C ; Goodyear, T ; Salway, T ; Gadermann, A ; Oliffe, JL ; Knight, R ; Dhari, S ; Jenkins, EK (Elsevier BV, 2022-01)
    This paper examines the mental health and substance use impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic among sexual and gender minority (SGM) populations as compared to non-SGM populations, and identifies risk factors for mental health and substance use impacts among SGM groups. Data were drawn from two rounds of a repeated cross-sectional monitoring survey of 6027 Canadian adults, with Round 1 conducted May 14-19, 2020 and Round 2 conducted September 14-21, 2020. Bivariate cross-tabulations with chi-square tests were utilized to identify differences in mental health and substance use outcomes between SGM and non-SGM groups. Separate multivariable logistic regression models were used to identify risk factors for mental health and substance use outcomes for all SGM respondents. Compared to non-SGM respondents, a greater proportion of SGM participants reported mental health and substance use impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, including deterioration in mental health, poor coping, suicidal thoughts, self-harm, alcohol and cannabis use, and use of substances to cope. Among SGM respondents, various risk factors, including having a pre-existing mental health condition, were identified as associated with mental health and substance use impacts. These widening inequities demonstrate the need for tailored public mental health actions during and beyond the pandemic.
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    The acceptability, effectiveness and gender responsiveness of participatory arts interventions in promoting mental health and Wellbeing: a systematic review
    O'Donnell, S ; Lohan, M ; Oliffe, JL ; Grant, D ; Galway, K (ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2021-03-06)
    BACKGROUND: This mixed methods review synthesizes the evidence of acceptability, effectiveness and gender-responsiveness of participatory arts interventions (PAIs) in promoting mental health and wellbeing among adults. METHODS: The search was restricted to empirical studies of PAIs that reported on outcomes relating to common mental health problems and wellbeing among adults aged ≥18 years old. The mixed methods appraisal tool was used for quality appraisal. A narrative synthesis was conducted. RESULTS: Thirty-two studies were included (1,058 participants). Typical PAI features are discussed. The evidence for effectiveness is limited by methodological issues. PAIs are perceived to benefit mental health via improved connectedness; emotional regulation; meaning-making & re-defining identity; and personal growth & empowerment. CONCLUSION: The review highlights the dearth of studies focused on men. Research standards to establish the evidence of effectiveness and the need to expand the evidence of acceptability beyond the "perceived effectiveness" domain are discussed.
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    'We're welcomed into people's homes every day' versus 'we're the people that come and arrest you': The relational production of masculinities and vulnerabilities among male first responders
    Linceviciute, S ; Ridge, D ; Gautier, C ; Broom, A ; Oliffe, J ; Dando, C (WILEY, 2022-05-19)
    Encouraging men to open-up about their feelings is a new cultural directive, yet little is known about how this works in practice, including to promote mental health. Ideals of hegemonic masculinity may be increasingly tolerating expressions of vulnerability in some areas of social life. However, the expression of vulnerability in paid work and/or career situations is regulated by organisational ideals and circumstances that may also produce distress. To address uncertainty in the literature, we investigated the experiences of men in traditionally male dominated professions, namely first responders (police, paramedics, and firefighters/rescue). Twenty-one UK based men of diverse ranks and experience currently working within first responder services participated in semi-structured telephone interviews. Distress was positioned as an inevitable part of the work. Yet, striking differences in institutionalised ways of expressing vulnerabilities differentiated the experiences of frontline workers, contributing to a wide spectrum of men's silence right through to relative openness about vulnerability, both in the workplace and domestic spheres. The findings provide importanat insights into how vulnerability is institutionally regulated, illuminating and contrasting how the possibilities for male vulnerabilities are socially produced.
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    Men’s anxiety, why it matters, and what is needed to limit its risk for male suicide
    Fisher, K ; Seidler, ZE ; King, K ; Oliffe, JL ; Robertson, S ; Rice, SM (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2022-12)
    Abstract Anxiety disorders are the most prevalent mental health disorder experienced by men. If left untreated, anxiety is predictive of psychiatric disorders including depression and associated suicide risk. Despite the prevalence and impact of men’s anxiety, it remains largely overlooked in the field of men’s mental health. Globally, men are reported to have lower rates of anxiety disorders compared to women; however, these sex-differences do not reflect the complexity and nuance of men’s experiences. There is early evidence to suggest a male-type anxiety phenotype which may go undetected with generic diagnostic classifications. Masculine norms (i.e., stoicism, toughness, invulnerability) appear to be central to men’s experiences and expressions of anxiety as well as men’s help-seeking and coping behaviours. This is particularly concerning given anxiety increases men’s risk of physical and psychological comorbidities and suicide risk. The effective assessment, detection and treatment of men’s anxiety is therefore critical to improve mental health outcomes across the male lifespan. We propose three key recommendations for the field of men’s anxiety: (i) to develop a theoretical model surrounding men’s experiences of anxiety, (ii) broaden mental health resources, interventions and suicide prevention strategies to encompass men’s gendered experiences of anxiety (e.g., sentiments of shame, physical symptom manifestation), and (iii) utilise informal supports (i.e., friends and family) as an avenue of intervention to improve men’s anxiety outcomes. Without a substantial research agenda in men’s anxiety, we will fail to recognise and respond to men’s gendered experiences of anxiety and ultimately fail to reduce male suicides.
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    Examining the Role of Traditional Masculinity and Depression in Men's Risk for Contracting COVID-19
    Walther, A ; Eggenberger, L ; Grub, J ; Ogrodniczuk, JS ; Seidler, ZE ; Rice, SM ; Kealy, D ; Oliffe, JL ; Ehlert, U (MDPI, 2022-03-01)
    In the light of the COVID-19 pandemic and claims that traditional masculinity may put some men at increased risk for infection, research reporting men's health behaviors is critically important. Traditional masculine norms such as self-reliance and toughness are associated with a lower likelihood to vaccinate or follow safety restrictions. Furthermore, infection risk and traditional masculinity should be investigated in a differentiated manner including gender role orientation, underlying traditional masculine ideologies and male gender role conflict. In this pre-registered online survey conducted during March/April 2021 in German-speaking countries in Europe, 490 men completed questionnaires regarding contracting COVID-19 as confirmed by a validated test, fear of COVID-19 (FCV-19S), and experience of psychological burden due to COVID-19. In addition, depression symptomatology was assessed by using prototypical internalizing and male-typical externalizing depression symptoms. Furthermore, self-identified masculine gender orientation, endorsement of traditional masculinity ideologies, and gender role conflict were measured. A total of 6.9% of men (n = 34) reported having contracted COVID-19 since the beginning of the pandemic. Group comparisons revealed that men who had contracted COVID-19 exhibited higher overall traditional masculine ideology and gender role conflict. Logistic regression controlling for confounders (age, income, education, and sexual orientation) indicated that only depression symptoms are independently associated with the risk of having contracted COVID-19. While prototypical depression symptoms were negatively associated with the risk of having contracted COVID-19, male-typical externalizing depression symptoms were positively associated with the risk of contracting COVID-19. For traditional masculinity, no robust association for an increased risk of contracting COVID-19 could be established, while higher male-typical externalizing depression symptoms were associated with an increased risk of contracting COVID-19.
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    Social Disconnection and Psychological Distress in Canadian Men During the COVID-19 Pandemic
    Simpson, NJ ; Oliffe, JL ; Rice, SM ; Kealy, D ; Seidler, ZE ; Ogrodniczuk, JS (SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC, 2022-01-01)
    The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly challenged many men's mental health. Efforts to control the spread of the virus have led to increasing social disconnection, fueling concerns about its long-term effects on men's mental health, and more specifically their experience of psychological distress. Social disconnection, psychological distress, and the relationship between them have yet to be formally explored in a Canadian male sample during the COVID-19 pandemic. The present study examined whether reduced social connection among men was associated with increased anxiety and depressive symptoms (psychological distress) and whether this association was moderated by living alone. The sample consisted of 434 help-seeking Canadian men who completed standardized measures. Analyses controlled for the potentially confounding effects of age and fear of COVID-19. Findings revealed that less social connection was associated with increased psychological distress. This association was not moderated by living alone, nor was living alone directly associated with psychological distress. Younger age and fear of COVID-19 were each independently associated with psychological distress. Socially disconnected men were more likely to experience anxiety and depressive symptoms, suggesting the need for interventions focussed on men's social connectedness, social support, and belongingness to help reduce some COVID-19-induced mental health risks.
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    "People say men don't talk, well that's bullshit": A focus group study exploring challenges and opportunities for men's mental health promotion.
    Sharp, P ; Bottorff, JL ; Rice, S ; Oliffe, JL ; Schulenkorf, N ; Impellizzeri, F ; Caperchione, CM ; Rajiah, K (Public Library of Science (PLoS), 2022)
    Men's mental health promotion presents unique challenges including gender-related barriers and stigmas, which demand novel approaches to prevention, treatment, and management. The aim of this study was to explore men's perceptions of mental health and preferences for mental health promotion. Seven focus groups (N = 59) were conducted in Sydney, Australia, including 5 groups of men (M = 50.65, SD = 13.75 years) and 2 groups of stakeholders who had frontline experience working with men (e.g., men's groups, health clubs, mental health advocates). Data were analysed using thematic analysis and interpreted using a gender relations approach to explore connections between gender roles, relations and identities, and men's mental health. Three overarching themes were identified; (1) Roles, identities, and the conceptualisation and concealment of mental health challenges, revealing challenges to mental health promotion related to perceptions of men's restrictive emotionality and emotional awareness as well as difficulties with conceptualising the internalised experiences of mental health, (2) Constraining social contexts of stigma and gender relations, identifying how social context and the policing of gender roles often obscured opportunities for discussing mental health and help-seeking behaviour, (3) Anchoring mental health promotion to acceptable lifestyle practices, highlighting potential remedies included leveraging men's social practices related to reciprocity, normalising mental health promotion relative to other behaviours, and embedding mental health promotion within acceptable masculine practices. Discussed are directions for men's community-based mental health promotion and opportunities for how masculinities may be negotiated and expanded to embody mental health promoting values.