Nursing - Research Publications

Permanent URI for this collection

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 17
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    An evaluation of the psychometric properties of the Fear of COVID-19 Scale in a sample of help-seeking men
    Rice, SM ; Trail, K ; Walton, CC ; Kealy, D ; Seidler, ZE ; Wilson, MJ ; Oliffe, JL ; Ogrodniczuk, JS (Komitet Redakcyjno - Wydawniczy Polskiego Towarzystwa Psychiatrycznego, 2022-03-01)
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Masculinity and mental illness in and after men's intimate partner relationships
    Oliffe, JL ; Kelly, MT ; Montaner, GG ; Seidler, ZE ; Ogrodniczuk, JS ; Rice, SM (Elsevier BV, 2022-12)
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Men’s anxiety, why it matters, and what is needed to limit its risk for male suicide
    Fisher, K ; Seidler, ZE ; King, K ; Oliffe, JL ; Robertson, S ; Rice, SM (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2022-12)
    Abstract Anxiety disorders are the most prevalent mental health disorder experienced by men. If left untreated, anxiety is predictive of psychiatric disorders including depression and associated suicide risk. Despite the prevalence and impact of men’s anxiety, it remains largely overlooked in the field of men’s mental health. Globally, men are reported to have lower rates of anxiety disorders compared to women; however, these sex-differences do not reflect the complexity and nuance of men’s experiences. There is early evidence to suggest a male-type anxiety phenotype which may go undetected with generic diagnostic classifications. Masculine norms (i.e., stoicism, toughness, invulnerability) appear to be central to men’s experiences and expressions of anxiety as well as men’s help-seeking and coping behaviours. This is particularly concerning given anxiety increases men’s risk of physical and psychological comorbidities and suicide risk. The effective assessment, detection and treatment of men’s anxiety is therefore critical to improve mental health outcomes across the male lifespan. We propose three key recommendations for the field of men’s anxiety: (i) to develop a theoretical model surrounding men’s experiences of anxiety, (ii) broaden mental health resources, interventions and suicide prevention strategies to encompass men’s gendered experiences of anxiety (e.g., sentiments of shame, physical symptom manifestation), and (iii) utilise informal supports (i.e., friends and family) as an avenue of intervention to improve men’s anxiety outcomes. Without a substantial research agenda in men’s anxiety, we will fail to recognise and respond to men’s gendered experiences of anxiety and ultimately fail to reduce male suicides.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Examining the Role of Traditional Masculinity and Depression in Men's Risk for Contracting COVID-19
    Walther, A ; Eggenberger, L ; Grub, J ; Ogrodniczuk, JS ; Seidler, ZE ; Rice, SM ; Kealy, D ; Oliffe, JL ; Ehlert, U (MDPI, 2022-03-01)
    In the light of the COVID-19 pandemic and claims that traditional masculinity may put some men at increased risk for infection, research reporting men's health behaviors is critically important. Traditional masculine norms such as self-reliance and toughness are associated with a lower likelihood to vaccinate or follow safety restrictions. Furthermore, infection risk and traditional masculinity should be investigated in a differentiated manner including gender role orientation, underlying traditional masculine ideologies and male gender role conflict. In this pre-registered online survey conducted during March/April 2021 in German-speaking countries in Europe, 490 men completed questionnaires regarding contracting COVID-19 as confirmed by a validated test, fear of COVID-19 (FCV-19S), and experience of psychological burden due to COVID-19. In addition, depression symptomatology was assessed by using prototypical internalizing and male-typical externalizing depression symptoms. Furthermore, self-identified masculine gender orientation, endorsement of traditional masculinity ideologies, and gender role conflict were measured. A total of 6.9% of men (n = 34) reported having contracted COVID-19 since the beginning of the pandemic. Group comparisons revealed that men who had contracted COVID-19 exhibited higher overall traditional masculine ideology and gender role conflict. Logistic regression controlling for confounders (age, income, education, and sexual orientation) indicated that only depression symptoms are independently associated with the risk of having contracted COVID-19. While prototypical depression symptoms were negatively associated with the risk of having contracted COVID-19, male-typical externalizing depression symptoms were positively associated with the risk of contracting COVID-19. For traditional masculinity, no robust association for an increased risk of contracting COVID-19 could be established, while higher male-typical externalizing depression symptoms were associated with an increased risk of contracting COVID-19.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Social Disconnection and Psychological Distress in Canadian Men During the COVID-19 Pandemic
    Simpson, NJ ; Oliffe, JL ; Rice, SM ; Kealy, D ; Seidler, ZE ; Ogrodniczuk, JS (SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC, 2022-01-01)
    The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly challenged many men's mental health. Efforts to control the spread of the virus have led to increasing social disconnection, fueling concerns about its long-term effects on men's mental health, and more specifically their experience of psychological distress. Social disconnection, psychological distress, and the relationship between them have yet to be formally explored in a Canadian male sample during the COVID-19 pandemic. The present study examined whether reduced social connection among men was associated with increased anxiety and depressive symptoms (psychological distress) and whether this association was moderated by living alone. The sample consisted of 434 help-seeking Canadian men who completed standardized measures. Analyses controlled for the potentially confounding effects of age and fear of COVID-19. Findings revealed that less social connection was associated with increased psychological distress. This association was not moderated by living alone, nor was living alone directly associated with psychological distress. Younger age and fear of COVID-19 were each independently associated with psychological distress. Socially disconnected men were more likely to experience anxiety and depressive symptoms, suggesting the need for interventions focussed on men's social connectedness, social support, and belongingness to help reduce some COVID-19-induced mental health risks.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    "People say men don't talk, well that's bullshit": A focus group study exploring challenges and opportunities for men's mental health promotion.
    Sharp, P ; Bottorff, JL ; Rice, S ; Oliffe, JL ; Schulenkorf, N ; Impellizzeri, F ; Caperchione, CM ; Rajiah, K (Public Library of Science (PLoS), 2022)
    Men's mental health promotion presents unique challenges including gender-related barriers and stigmas, which demand novel approaches to prevention, treatment, and management. The aim of this study was to explore men's perceptions of mental health and preferences for mental health promotion. Seven focus groups (N = 59) were conducted in Sydney, Australia, including 5 groups of men (M = 50.65, SD = 13.75 years) and 2 groups of stakeholders who had frontline experience working with men (e.g., men's groups, health clubs, mental health advocates). Data were analysed using thematic analysis and interpreted using a gender relations approach to explore connections between gender roles, relations and identities, and men's mental health. Three overarching themes were identified; (1) Roles, identities, and the conceptualisation and concealment of mental health challenges, revealing challenges to mental health promotion related to perceptions of men's restrictive emotionality and emotional awareness as well as difficulties with conceptualising the internalised experiences of mental health, (2) Constraining social contexts of stigma and gender relations, identifying how social context and the policing of gender roles often obscured opportunities for discussing mental health and help-seeking behaviour, (3) Anchoring mental health promotion to acceptable lifestyle practices, highlighting potential remedies included leveraging men's social practices related to reciprocity, normalising mental health promotion relative to other behaviours, and embedding mental health promotion within acceptable masculine practices. Discussed are directions for men's community-based mental health promotion and opportunities for how masculinities may be negotiated and expanded to embody mental health promoting values.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Job Satisfaction and Psychological Distress among Help-Seeking Men: Does Meaning in Life Play a Role?
    Simard, AAP ; Seidler, ZE ; Oliffe, JL ; Rice, SM ; Kealy, D ; Walther, A ; Ogrodniczuk, JS (MDPI, 2022-03-01)
    Men's low job satisfaction has been shown to be associated with greater symptoms of psychological distress. Meaning in life may be an important factor in this relationship, but its role as a mediator has not been reported. The present study investigated meaning in life as a mediator in the relationship between job satisfaction and psychological distress among men. A total of 229 employed Canadian men participated in a cross-sectional survey, completing measures of depression and anxiety symptoms, anger severity, job satisfaction, and the presence of meaning in life. Zero-order correlations were calculated, and regression with mediation analyses were conducted; two models were tested: one for anxiety/depression symptoms and one for anger, as the dependent variables. Both mediation models emerged as significant, revealing a significant mediating effect for job satisfaction on the symptoms of psychological distress (anxiety/depression symptoms, anger) through meaning in life, even while controlling for salient confounding variables including COVID-related impacts. Lower job satisfaction was associated with less meaning in life, which in turn was associated with more symptoms of depression, anxiety, and anger. The findings highlight the importance of job satisfaction in the promotion of a sense of meaning in life among men, leading to improved psychological well-being both inside and outside of the workplace.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Reflective functioning and men's mental health: Associations with resilience and personal growth initiative
    Kealy, D ; Rice, SM ; Seidler, ZE ; Oliffe, JL ; Ogrodniczuk, JS (WILEY, 2021-02-05)
    Mentalizing, or reflective functioning, refers to the capacity to reflect on one's own and others' mental states in terms of desires, intentions, and feelings. Reflective functioning in men's mental health is poorly understood, particularly in reference to men's resilience and motivation for personal growth. Using a cross-sectional design, the present study investigated impaired reflective functioning in relation to resilience and personal growth initiative among men with mental health concerns. An online sample of 1065 men self-reporting mental health concerns completed measures of reflective functioning, psychological distress, resilience, and personal growth initiative. Logistic regression examined reflective functioning in relation to likely serious mental illness, including interaction with age. Subsequent regression analyses controlled for distress severity in examining associations with resilience and personal growth initiative, and in examining the potential mediating role of reflective functioning. Impaired reflective functioning was significantly associated with serious psychological distress irrespective of age and, after controlling for distress severity, with resilience and personal growth initiative. Moreover, impaired reflective functioning was a significant mediator of the relationship between resilience and personal growth initiative. Findings provide preliminary support for reflective functioning as salient to men's resilience and agency for personal change, indicating a potentially important target in men's mental health work.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    "Eventually, I Admitted, 'I Cannot Do This Alone'": Exploring Experiences of Suicidality and Help-Seeking Drivers Among Australian Men
    Seidler, ZE ; Wilson, MJ ; Oliffe, JL ; Kealy, D ; Toogood, N ; Ogrodniczuk, JS ; Rice, SM (FRONTIERS MEDIA SA, 2021-10-01)
    While research has explored the intersection between masculinities and men's experiences of suicidality, comparatively little attention has been paid to the stories surrounding suicidal men's decision to seek help. The ways in which men experiencing suicidal thoughts and behaviors embody masculinities alongside their enlistment of mental health services remains largely unknown. The present study explored 262 Australian men's stories surrounding the impetus for help-seeking for suicidal thoughts and behaviors. The sample comprised men ranging in age from 17 to 74 years (M = 40.99; SD = 15.92 years), with most participants residing in a metropolitan area (55.3%), employed full time (43.1%), non-indigenous (95.4%) and heterosexual (73.7%). Participants elaborated on their reasons for help-seeking via an open-text qualitative survey, delivered as part of a larger study exploring help-seeking experiences of Australian men. Thematic analysis of responses generated four themes highlighting the diversity of experience across men, with some highlighting impacts of emasculating early trauma(s) on their suicidality, while others reflected an impulsiveness tied to situational stressors that fractured their masculine identity (e.g., relationship breakdown; job loss). Many men had epiphanies as they reached the limits of their self-reliance and came to terms with their need for help. As their suicidality was witnessed by-and began to impact-those around them, the sight of their previously masked pain by others often facilitated their help-seeking journey. The present findings underscore the complex and multifactorial role of masculinities in men's suicidality and their paths to help-seeking. Important inroads for future public mental health promotion efforts are discussed, in terms of leveraging self-reliant and caring masculinities in helping men to develop healthy coping in the context of suicidality.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Promoting Healthier Masculinities as a Suicide Prevention Intervention in a Regional Australian Community: A Qualitative Study of Stakeholder Perspectives
    Trail, K ; Oliffe, JL ; Patel, D ; Robinson, J ; King, K ; Armstrong, G ; Seidler, Z ; Walton, CC ; Wilson, MJ ; Rice, SM (FRONTIERS MEDIA SA, 2021-12-08)
    Regionally-based Australian men have a higher risk of suicide than those in urban centers, with similar trends observed internationally. Adopting a place-based approach to understanding men's suicide and harm prevention provides contextual insights to guide localised opportunities for the development of tailored gender-specific interventions. Men in rural Australia are typically portrayed as embodying idealized masculinity-dominant and tough, upholding strength and stoicism in the face of hardship. Such values can increase suicide risk in men by reducing help-seeking. The Macedon Ranges Shire is an inner regional municipality with a population of approximately 50,000 people spanning across 10 regional towns and surrounding farming areas in Victoria, Australia. Understanding the influence of masculinities on men's wellbeing and help seeking behaviours in a regional context is vital in order to inform effective local suicide prevention efforts. The present research involved in-depth qualitative interviews with 19 community stakeholders (M = 49.89 years, SD = 11.82) predominantly working in healthcare and community services including emergency services and education. Using thematic analysis, interview transcripts were coded and themes inductively derived. Stakeholders identified three key areas for understanding suicide risk and wellbeing for local men; 1) localizing masculinities, 2) belonging in community, and 3) engaging men. Findings illustrate that addressing men's wellbeing in regional areas requires a multifaceted whole-of-community approach. While diverse, local expressions of masculinities were seen as contributors to men's challenges understanding their emotional worlds and reticence for help-seeking. Of vital need is to provide diverse opportunities for men to connect with others in the region, and offer inclusive spaces where men feel accepted, welcomed and able to meaningfully contribute to the community. Not only will this assist by bolstering men's sense of self, identity, and mental wellbeing, it may also provide valuable informal inroads to normalizing healthy communication around mental health and seeking mental health care. These findings offer important suggestions for the promotion of healthier masculinities in regionally-based Australian men, which may help to improve wellbeing of these men and their entire communities.