Nursing - Research Publications

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    Protocol for a randomized controlled trial of the Men in Mind training for mental health practitioners to enhance their clinical competencies for working with male clients
    Seidler, ZE ; Wilson, MJ ; Toogood, NW ; Oliffe, JL ; Kealy, D ; Ogrodniczuk, JS ; Owen, J ; Mackinnon, A ; Le, LK-D ; Mihalopoulos, C ; Pirkis, J ; Rice, S (SPRINGERNATURE, 2022-07-15)
    BACKGROUND: Although the proportion of men seeking professional mental health care has risen over the past two decades, on average, men continue to attend fewer sessions of psychotherapy and are more likely to drop out of treatment prematurely compared to women. Men account for three-quarters of suicide deaths; furthermore, over half of the males who die by suicide have engaged with mental health care in the 12 months prior to their death. These findings highlight a need to equip mental health practitioners with skills to improve male clients' engagement and mental health outcomes. This article reports the protocol for a randomized controlled trial of Men in Mind, a self-paced online training program purpose-built to advance the clinical competencies of practitioners who provide psychotherapy to male clients. METHODS: A randomized controlled trial with two parallel groups will be conducted. Participating practitioners will be randomly allocated, on a 1:1 basis, to the intervention group (Men in Mind training) or a waitlist control group. The primary outcome, efficacy of the training, will be evaluated by pre- to post-training (T1 to T2) changes in scores on the Engaging Men in Therapy Scale (EMITS) in the intervention group, relative to the control group. DISCUSSION: This trial will provide evidence of the efficacy of Men in Mind training, as an interim step towards adjusting content and delivery of the intervention to maximize the potential for sustaining and scaling. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The trial was registered prospectively with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry on 3rd December 2021 (ACTRN12621001669886).
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    Mapping Men's Mental Health Help-Seeking After an Intimate Partner Relationship Break-Up
    Oliffe, JL ; Kelly, MT ; Montaner, GG ; Seidler, ZE ; Kealy, D ; Ogrodniczuk, JS ; Rice, SM (SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC, 2022-06-25)
    Deleterious effects of separation and divorce on men's mental health are well-documented; however, little is known about their help-seeking when adjusting to these all-too-common life transitions. Employing interpretive descriptive methods, interviews with 47 men exploring their mental health help-seeking after a relationship break-up were analyzed in deriving three themes: (1) Solitary work and tapping established connections, (2) Reaching out to make new connections, and (3) Engaging professional mental health care. Men relying on solitary work and established connections accessed relationship-focused self-help books, online resources, and confided in friends and/or family. Some participants supplemented solitary work by reaching out to make new connections including peer-based men's groups and education and social activities. Comprising first-time, returning, and continuing users, many men responded to relationship break-up crises by engaging professional mental health care. The findings challenge longstanding commentaries that men actively avoid mental health promotion by illuminating wide-ranging help resources.
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    Exploring Teacher and Parent Perspectives on School-Based Masculinities in Relation to Mental Health Promotion
    Wilson, MJ ; Gwyther, K ; Simmons, M ; Swann, R ; Oliffe, JL ; Casey, K ; Rice, SM (FRONTIERS MEDIA SA, 2022-06-13)
    The capacity for boys' and young men's mental health promotion to act via shifting masculine norms that are linked to poor mental health outcomes, highlights the need to improve the extent to which school-based programs can promote mental health through leveraging more positive embodiments of masculinity. To-date, the perspectives of parents and teachers on such processes are understudied. This qualitative study presents teacher and parent views regarding adolescent masculinities and avenues for school-based developmental programming for boys and young men. In this study, 16 individual qualitative interviews were undertaken with 10 parents (six females, four males), and six teachers (three females, three males), recruited from an independent all-boys' grammar school in Melbourne, Australia. Thematic analysis of parents' and teachers' perspectives indicated their perception of the role of context-dependent "public" and "private" masculinities, the influence of Australian masculinity norms, and the role of private boys' school cultures in the development of adolescent masculinities. Additionally, strategies for development encompassed participants' appetite for boys' exposure to positive role models, in addition to consistent and relevant developmental programming to support positive masculinity development. Findings have implications for efforts to support prosocial masculine identity development via school-based initiatives, as an avenue to promoting mental health of boys and young men.
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    Sexual abuse and mental ill health in boys and men: what we do and don't know
    Rice, SM ; Easton, SD ; Seidler, ZE ; Oliffe, JL (CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS, 2022-06-09)
    The spectrum of adverse mental health trajectories caused by sexual abuse, broadly defined as exposure to rape and unwanted physical sexual contact, is well-known. Few studies have systematically appraised the epidemiology and impact of sexual abuse among boys and men. New meta-analytic insights (k = 44; n = 45 172) reported by Zarchev and colleagues challenge assumptions that men experiencing mental ill health rarely report sexual abuse exposure. Adult-onset sexual abuse rates of 1-7% are observed in the general population, but for men experiencing mental ill health, adult lifetime prevalence was 14.1% (95% CI 7.3-22.4%), with past-year exposure 5.3% (95% CI 1.6-12.8%). We note that these rates are certainly underestimates, as childhood sexual abuse exposures were excluded. Boys and men with a sexual abuse history experience substantial disclosure and treatment barriers. We draw attention to population health gains that could be achieved via implementation of gender-sensitive assessment and intervention approaches for this at-risk population.
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    "Appreciate the Little Things": A Qualitative Survey of Men's Coping Strategies and Mental Health Impacts During the COVID-19 Pandemic
    Wilson, MJ ; Seidler, ZE ; Oliffe, JL ; Toogood, N ; Kealy, D ; Ogrodniczuk, JS ; Walther, A ; Rice, SM (SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC, 2022-05-01)
    The COVID-19 pandemic has presented a suite of circumstances that will simultaneously affect mental health and mobilize coping strategies in response. Building on a lack of research specifically exploring men's mental health impacts during the COVID-19 pandemic, this study presents the results of a qualitative survey exploring men's self-reported aspects of the pandemic giving rise to mental health challenges, alongside their diverse coping strategies applied during this time. The sample comprised 555 men from North America (age M = 38.8 years; SD = 13.5 years), who participated via an online survey with two open-ended qualitative questions assessing, respectively, the aspects of the pandemic affecting their mental health, and the strategies used to manage these challenges. Free-text responses were coded using inductive content analysis. Results pertaining to the mental health impacts of COVID-19 were categorized into two overarching themes: far-reaching ramifications of COVID-19 encompassing consequences for lifestyle, work, and functioning, alongside novel anxieties related to health risks and daily uncertainty. In addition, coping strategies reported were categorized into two broad themes: efforts to avoid, dull or distract oneself from distress, alongside adapting and doing things differently, which encompassed largely approach-oriented efforts to flexibly ameliorate distress. Results signal the far-reaching impacts of COVID-19, alongside profound flexibility and diverse enactments of resilience among men in adapting to unprecedented challenges. Findings have implications for mental health promotion that should aim to leverage men's adaptive coping to encourage opportunities for social connectedness in response to the mental health impacts of the various psychosocial challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic.
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    An evaluation of the psychometric properties of the Fear of COVID-19 Scale in a sample of help-seeking men
    Rice, SM ; Trail, K ; Walton, CC ; Kealy, D ; Seidler, ZE ; Wilson, MJ ; Oliffe, JL ; Ogrodniczuk, JS (Komitet Redakcyjno - Wydawniczy Polskiego Towarzystwa Psychiatrycznego, 2022-03-01)
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    Suicide amongst young Inuit males: The perspectives of Inuit health and wellness workers in Nunavik
    Affleck, W ; Oliffe, JL ; Inukpuk, MM ; Tempier, R ; Darroch, F ; Crawford, A ; Séguin, M (Elsevier BV, 2022-12)
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    Masculinity and mental illness in and after men's intimate partner relationships
    Oliffe, JL ; Kelly, MT ; Montaner, GG ; Seidler, ZE ; Ogrodniczuk, JS ; Rice, SM (Elsevier BV, 2022-12)
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    Widening mental health and substance use inequities among sexual and gender minority populations: Findings from a repeated cross-sectional monitoring survey during the COVID-19 pandemic in Canada.
    Slemon, A ; Richardson, C ; Goodyear, T ; Salway, T ; Gadermann, A ; Oliffe, JL ; Knight, R ; Dhari, S ; Jenkins, EK (Elsevier BV, 2022-01)
    This paper examines the mental health and substance use impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic among sexual and gender minority (SGM) populations as compared to non-SGM populations, and identifies risk factors for mental health and substance use impacts among SGM groups. Data were drawn from two rounds of a repeated cross-sectional monitoring survey of 6027 Canadian adults, with Round 1 conducted May 14-19, 2020 and Round 2 conducted September 14-21, 2020. Bivariate cross-tabulations with chi-square tests were utilized to identify differences in mental health and substance use outcomes between SGM and non-SGM groups. Separate multivariable logistic regression models were used to identify risk factors for mental health and substance use outcomes for all SGM respondents. Compared to non-SGM respondents, a greater proportion of SGM participants reported mental health and substance use impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, including deterioration in mental health, poor coping, suicidal thoughts, self-harm, alcohol and cannabis use, and use of substances to cope. Among SGM respondents, various risk factors, including having a pre-existing mental health condition, were identified as associated with mental health and substance use impacts. These widening inequities demonstrate the need for tailored public mental health actions during and beyond the pandemic.
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    The acceptability, effectiveness and gender responsiveness of participatory arts interventions in promoting mental health and Wellbeing: a systematic review
    O'Donnell, S ; Lohan, M ; Oliffe, JL ; Grant, D ; Galway, K (ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2021-03-06)
    BACKGROUND: This mixed methods review synthesizes the evidence of acceptability, effectiveness and gender-responsiveness of participatory arts interventions (PAIs) in promoting mental health and wellbeing among adults. METHODS: The search was restricted to empirical studies of PAIs that reported on outcomes relating to common mental health problems and wellbeing among adults aged ≥18 years old. The mixed methods appraisal tool was used for quality appraisal. A narrative synthesis was conducted. RESULTS: Thirty-two studies were included (1,058 participants). Typical PAI features are discussed. The evidence for effectiveness is limited by methodological issues. PAIs are perceived to benefit mental health via improved connectedness; emotional regulation; meaning-making & re-defining identity; and personal growth & empowerment. CONCLUSION: The review highlights the dearth of studies focused on men. Research standards to establish the evidence of effectiveness and the need to expand the evidence of acceptability beyond the "perceived effectiveness" domain are discussed.