Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences Collected Works - Research Publications

Permanent URI for this collection

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 12
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Intestinal Small Cell Lymphoma: Are Dogs Big Cats?
    Dandrieux, J (ACVIM, 2019-06-08)
    Previously T-cell lymphomas of the gastrointestinal tract in human were classified as enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL) type I and type II. Type I is associated with celiac disease and characterized by large lymphocytes, whereas type II is not associated to enteropathies and characterized by small lymphocytes. In view of these differences, the nomenclature has been changed and EATL currently refers only to type I and type II has been renamed monomorphic epitheliotropic intestinal T-cell lymphoma (MEITL).1 EATL has an aggressive clinical course and tumor cells most commonly have an αβ T-cell receptor phenotype. In comparison MEITL tumour cells express CD8, CD56, and megakaryocyte-associated tyrosine kinase. T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (TLPD) is another type of small cell lymphoma described in the intestinal tract. This lymphoma has typically an indolent clinical course and commonly express CD8 and is negative for CD4 and CD56, Markers of T-cell lymphomas of the gastrointestinal tract have been much less extensively studied in cats and dogs and for this reason for the purpose of this lecture small cell lymphoma (SCL) will be used for neoplastic cells with nuclei smaller than 2 red blood cells in diameter and large cell lymphoma (LCL) for larger neoplastic cells. SCL characterized by infiltration of the intestinal mucosa by mature T-cells with variable epitheliotropism has been described for more than 10 years in cats. SCL has better outcome than other types of lymphoma in this species, with median survival times over 1.5 years.3 Although criteria have been described in cats to diagnose SCL, these are not as well defined in dogs. However, several recent studies support that SCL is also present in dogs and the clinical findings and outcome will be described in this presentation.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Chronic Enteropathy In Canines: Prevalence, Impact And Management Strategies
    Dandrieux, JRS ; Mansfield, CS (Dove Press, 2019-12-06)
    In this article, the studies about the prevalence of chronic enteropathy are reviewed as well as the information regarding short- and long-term prognosis for dogs treated with the three most common therapies; these include dietary modification, antibiotics, and immunosuppressants. Although the data available are limited, most studies support a good to excellent long-term response in dogs that have a successful food trial, whereas the response is poor with antibiotics or on-going treatment is required to retain remission. There is a risk of antimicrobial resistance developing with inappropriate use of antimicrobials such as in these situations. The published information highlights the need for alternative strategies to antibiotic treatment to manipulate the GI microbiome, and in the final part of this article studies on the use of probiotic for the treatment of chronic enteropathy are reviewed.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    ACVIM consensus statement on the diagnosis of immune-mediated hemolytic anemia in dogs and cats
    Garden, OA ; Kidd, L ; Mexas, AM ; Chang, Y-M ; Jeffery, U ; Blois, SL ; Fogle, JE ; MacNeill, AL ; Lubas, G ; Birkenheuer, A ; Buoncompagni, S ; Dandrieux, JRS ; Di Loria, A ; Fellman, CL ; Glanemann, B ; Goggs, R ; Granick, JL ; LeVine, DN ; Sharp, CR ; Smith-Carr, S ; Swann, JW ; Szladovits, B (WILEY, 2019-03-01)
    Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in dogs. IMHA also occurs in cats, although less commonly. IMHA is considered secondary when it can be attributed to an underlying disease, and as primary (idiopathic) if no cause is found. Eliminating diseases that cause IMHA may attenuate or stop immune-mediated erythrocyte destruction, and adverse consequences of long-term immunosuppressive treatment can be avoided. Infections, cancer, drugs, vaccines, and inflammatory processes may be underlying causes of IMHA. Evidence for these comorbidities has not been systematically evaluated, rendering evidence-based decisions difficult. We identified and extracted data from studies published in the veterinary literature and developed a novel tool for evaluation of evidence quality, using it to assess study design, diagnostic criteria for IMHA, comorbidities, and causality. Succinct evidence summary statements were written, along with screening recommendations. Statements were refined by conducting 3 iterations of Delphi review with panel and task force members. Commentary was solicited from several professional bodies to maximize clinical applicability before the recommendations were submitted. The resulting document is intended to provide clinical guidelines for diagnosis of, and underlying disease screening for, IMHA in dogs and cats. These should be implemented with consideration of animal, owner, and geographical factors.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Changes in duodenal CD163-positive cells in dogs with chronic enteropathy after successful treatment
    Dandrieux, JRS ; Lopez, LMM ; Stent, A ; Jergens, A ; Allenspach, K ; Nowell, CJ ; Firestone, SM ; Kimpton, W ; Mansfield, CS (SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD, 2018-10-01)
    Chronic enteropathy (CE) in dogs is characterized retrospectively per treatment response as food-responsive enteropathy (FRE), antibiotic-responsive enteropathy (ARE), and immunosuppressant-responsive enteropathy (IRE) - the latter most resembling inflammatory bowel disease in people. The aim of this study was to characterize duodenal macrophages (Mϕ) in CE using immunohistochemistry; with calprotectin (CAL) as a marker of early differentiated Mϕ and CD163 expression as a marker for resident Mϕ in the duodenum before and after treatment. Prior to treatment, dogs with FRE and IRE had a lower CD163+/CAL+ ratio than control dogs (CTRL) in crypts; this increased significantly and normalized compared with CTRL after treatment. Conversely, the CD163+/CAL+ ratio in dogs with ARE was comparable to that in healthy dogs before and after treatment. In summary, these results suggest that Mϕ play a role in the pathogenesis of CE in FRE and IRE, with a decrease in resident Mϕ and an increase in early differentiated Mϕ, but not in ARE dogs. Mϕ normalize after successful treatment.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Effect of immunosuppressive drugs on cytokine production in canine whole blood stimulated with lipopolysaccharide or a combination of ionomycin and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate
    Dandrieux, JRS ; Narayanan, L ; Firestone, S ; Archer, TM ; Mansfield, CS (John Wiley & Sons, 2019-05)
    A pharmacodynamic assay has been previously developed to monitor ciclosporin treatment in dogs by assessing inhibition of cytokine transcription after whole blood stimulation with 12-myristate 13-1 acetate and ionomycin (PMA/I). In this study, whole blood stimulation with either PMA/I or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was used to assess the effect of multiple drugs (azathioprine, ciclosporin, mycophenolate, leflunomide and prednisone) after a 7-day treatment course on production of cytokines measured with a multiplex assay in healthy dogs (n = 4 for each treatment). Interleukin-10 (IL-10), interferon gamma (IFN?) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFa) were significantly activated by PMA/I stimulation and IL-6, IL-10 and TNFa by LPS stimulation, in the absence of immunosuppressive drugs. After ciclosporin treatment, IL-10, IFN? and TNFa production was significantly reduced after stimulation with PMA/I compared to pre-treatment. After prednisone treatment, TNFa production was significantly reduced after stimulation with PMA/I or LPS compared to pre-treatment. No significant change was observed after treatment with azathioprine, leflunomide or mycophenolate. This methodology may be useful to monitor dogs not only treated with ciclosporin, but also with prednisone or a combination of both. Further studies are needed to assess the use of this assay in a clinical setting.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Chronic enteropathy: Faecal microbiota transplant or antibiotic trial?
    Dandrieux, J (Australian Institute of Professional Intelligence Officers,, 2018-07-06)
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Optimization of immunotherapy
    Dandrieux, J (Australian and New Zealand College Of Veterinary Scientists Small Animal Chapter, 2018-07-05)
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Immune suppressive drugs: Do we need more than prednisolone?
    Dandrieux, J (Australian Veterinary Association, 2018-05-14)
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    How to monitor dogs on immune-suppressive drugs - Anything new?
    Dandrieux, J (Australian Veterinary Association, 2018-05-16)
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Chronic enteropathy and diet Response
    Dandrieux, J ; German, A (AMER VETERINARY MEDICAL ASSOC, 2013-09-15)