Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences Collected Works - Research Publications

Permanent URI for this collection

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 23
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    The Future of Small-holder Dairying
    Falvey, J (Asian-Australasian Association of Animal Production Societies, 2000)
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    The Role of Smallholders in Thai Agricultural Development
    Falvey, J (Kasetsart University Research and Development Institute (KURDI), 2000)
    The role of smallholders in underpinning the Thai economy through exported and domestic product and supporting their 70 percent of the population without government welfare is emphasised in a review of the needs for smallholder development. Economic development models are discussed in a context of agriculture fuelling economic growth with a revision of assumptions that family farms can be viewed as a phase toward large-scale commercial agriculture. Intensive smallholder agriculture permits production of high quality produce, efficient use of by- and waste products in integrated systems, and maintenance of cultural values. The review concludes that specific attention to smallholders is a primary responsibility of government and requires policies based on alternative agriculture, self-sufficiency and social welfare as distinct from the commercial policies of agribusiness.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Early origins of agriculture in Thailand
    FALVEY, JL (Asian Agri-History Foundation, 2001)
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    The Tai and Thai Agriculture
    Falvey, J (Asian Agri-History Foundation, 2001)
    Beginning as lowland wet rice growers in China more than a millennium ago, the Tai brought in their southward migration, glutinous rice associated with their muang fai irrigation technology, which with refinement proved sustainable into the 20th century. Integrating with the existing Mon-Khmer system, the Tai widened their agricultural capabilities and administrative system to utilize water from larger northern Thai rivers. They evolved a complex blend of animism and Buddhism, which incorporated traditional ceremonies relating to rice and agriculture from their own, and the cultures blending to form the Thai. Despite modern searches for Tai historical environmental values, modification of the natural environment seems to have been more important than its preservation, although retention of holy wood lots and spirit worship may indicate a level of interest in forests above that of other agricultural communities. This is the second of four papers dealing with the history of Thai agriculture.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Beginnings of Thai agricultural expansion from 1200AD
    FALVEY, JL (Asian Agri-History Foundation, 2001)
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Thai Agriculture from Ayutthaya to the early 20th Century
    FALVEY, JL (Asian Agri-History Foundation, 2001)
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    The Success of the Chinese in Thailand: The Case of Agribusiness
    Falvey, J (SEACOM, 2002)
    The Chinese of Thailand have been critical to the emergence and growth of Thailand’s agribusiness. From assumption of embryonic colonial European enterprises in seventeenth century Thailand, Chinese traders proved adaptable to remote areas and as Crown agents. Despite periodic restrictions of Chinese and their businesses, social integration and economic power ensured a continuing place until major expansion in the 1960s. This required the combined resources of the Chinese-Thai community through inputs supply, trading and banking and soon transcended Thailand’s borders. A significant success in immigration and social policy terms, the concentration of government policy on supporting commercial developments has incidentally alienated the small-holder and self-sufficient sector of agriculture.
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Supporting smallholder dairying in Asia
    CHANTALAKHANA, C ; FALVEY, JL (United Nations Publications, 2001)
  • Item
  • Item