Melbourne Graduate School of Education - Theses

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    A study of the notion of role in relation to the behaviour of full-time mature students in a regional college
    Ryan, Yoni (1948-) ( 1979)
    The study seeks to analyze the motivations and performance of forty-five mature students in full-time courses in a regional college from the theoretical perspective of role. Role theory and empirical studies based on the literature are outlined and queried; a hypothetical model is set up, to ascertain the supposed behaviour of adults entering 'a re-socialization experience', and this is tested against findings from the study itself. The conclusion is that role theory has a limited validity as in explanation or predictor of adult behaviour, particularly in a complex society, and that many factors, environmental as well as philosophical, must be taken into account in assessing adult behaviour. Nevertheless, role behaviour can be seen as an element of behaviour, particularly the behaviour of older adults; it has less application to younger adults.
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    Completion and non-completion amongst TAFE marketing students at a university of technology
    Taafe, Michael R ( 2001)
    The numbers of TAFE Marketing students who do not go on to complete the Advanced Diploma of Marketing at Swinbume University of Technology is substantial. This problem has been researched as part of this thesis with a view to identifying those factors, which distinguish persisters from withdrawers. Previous research covering the higher education, vocational and further education sectors, particularly in the United States, United Kingdom and Australia, has identified a number of personal factors, institutional variables and environmental factors which increase the tendency of students to withdraw from courses of study. This study involved conducting a survey of a sample of 165 part-time and full-time students enrolled in the Advanced Diploma of Marketing at the Hawthorn, Wantima, Croydon and Lilydale campuses of the Swinbume University of Technology for the first semester of 2000. The study found that withdrawers are less likely to be satisfied with the standard of teaching, are less likely to have undertaken the course to gain entry to another course, are less likely to consider that their employment prospects will be enhanced by completing the course and are less likely to be satisfied with the extent of their intellectual development and are more likely to be enrolled as a part time student. The tendency of students to withdraw from the course was not affected by satisfaction with services provided by the university, the degree of their social integration, their ability to balance the academic workload of the course with competing demands, personal problems, demographic variables or educational background.
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    Preparing for university : a case study of students in a tertiary preparation course
    Noble, Rosemary Isabel ( 2003)
    Courses that prepare students for tertiary study have been developed in Australian TAFE institutes and universities in response to high dropout rates and government policy aimed at increasing opportunities for tertiary study. One such course, the Adult Tertiary Preparation (ATP) course, at Certificate IV level of the Australian Qualifications Framework, and in particular, its core subject, Language and Learning, was the focus of this study. The aim of the study was to identify and explain changes in characteristics of readiness for self-directed learning, and subsequent changes in identity, in the students enrolled in this course. A group of ten students, broadly representative of the total intake, was interviewed and observed at the beginning, middle and end of the year-long course. When asked to reflect on how they had learned, most placed emphasis on the course content, structure and processes, and on the various forms of participation afforded them within the class group. For some people, relationships with other students, teachers and the wider TAFE community made an important contribution to their learning, with personal preferences for learning in particular ways influencing the direction of skill and identity development. All those who completed the course developed higher aspirations about their future educational and vocational directions. Implications for the future development of the ATP course and its core subject, Language and Learning, and other similar courses and subjects, are discussed.
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    Recruits to the professions: the backgrounds, dispositions and performance of students entering engineering, law, medicine and teaching
    Anderson, D. S. ( 1971)
    This study is about what happens to students in university professional faculties. The investigation from which most of the observations come is a longitudinal study in which students are followed from the time of first enrolment until they leave university (by graduating or without a qualification) and beyond into the early years of work. The theoretical perspective is professional socialization. (From introduction)