Melbourne Graduate School of Education - Theses

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    A comparative study of primary school social studies in three Australian states : Victoria, New South Wales and Western Australia, 1952-1975
    Reed, R. L (1943-) ( 1976)
    This study is concerned with the way in which Primary school Social Studies curricula have been revised, organized and developed from 1952 to 1975 in three Australian States - Victoria, New South Wales and Western Australia. As few commercially produced Social Studies courses, or indeed Social Studies units, have been forthcoming in these States, coverage in this thesis concentrates on those syllabus revisions which have been produced by Revision Committees organized by the respective Education Departments in these States. Underlying factors which have been instrumental in Social Studies revisions and their final outcome - a Social Studies Syllabus - have been analyzed by considering those constraints which form a part of the Curriculum Materials Analysis System (1967). The constituent six part cluster questions have been used in horizontal analysis to highlight features of Social Studies courses in the 1950's as compared to those of the 1960's, and the most significant changes which have occurred in the most current revisions. From courses which presented a high degree of uniformity in their emphasis on facts, social living and citizenship, have emerged State revisions which, though differing in format and degree of inclusiveness, reflect attributes commonly associated with 'new' Social Studies.
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    What are the objectives of the State College of Victoria at Frankston courses as perceived by students, lecturing staff (education), and teachers in the field
    Mutimer, Kevin H ( 1975)
    The purpose of this study was to investigate the Objectives of the State College of Victoria at Frankston as perceived by students, lecturing staff (in Education) and teachers in the field. The number of cases used was 227, including 25 first year private students, 40 first year studentship holders, 25 third year studentship holders, as well as 23 College education staff and 114 supervising teachers, of which only 61 replies were of value. The subjects were required to complete an open ended questionnaire on what they believed 'are' the objectives of the S.C.V. and what 'should be' the objectives. An inspection of the responses was made by using Content Analysis. It appeared that the responses fell into three fairly clearly defined areas of Objectives, viz. Professional, Academic and Personal Development. Further examination of the data indicated that an item had a positive or negative valence, i.e., the respondent indicated approval or disapproval of the item as an Objective. The Objectives were raw scored, and the frequency of mention was converted to percentages of the whole group being scored. This was done for both +ve and -ve valence, thus indicating whether a respondent was critical of or favourable to the perceived College Objectives. Further data was obtained by asking College lecturers and teachers in the field to rate on a scale +5 to -5 whether the College was doing what it should be doing in achieving College Objectives. The findings indicate that there is general agreement about the current levels of professional objectives as perceived by the different groups. there is consistent demand for more professional studies, except from college lecturers in Education. Colleges are seen by all groups as having an academic content which should be decreased markedly at all levels. Colleges are recognised as having a low personal development level which all but critical teachers agree needs to be significantly increased.
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    The State College of Victoria
    Quin, Michael James ( 1977)
    The Martin Report's proposal that the control of teacher education outside universities should be by statutory state Boards of Teacher Education funded partly by the Commonwealth, was initially rejected. However the states gradually relinquished some control as the demands for expanded teacher education facilities became more urgent. At the same time, the Commonwealth Government, anxious to assist smaller colleges of advanced education and their growth prospects, offered substantial funding for teacher education within smaller c.a.e.'s. In Victoria, pressure from the principals and staffs of the teachers' colleges through their respective associations led to negotiations for the independence of teachers' colleges. An advisory Teacher Education Authority was proposed by the Education Department as an initial step in the evolution of teachers' colleges to independence. Later, an Education Department Committee proposed the formation of a Victoria Institute of Teacher Education, as the umbrella authority supervising independent member colleges with their own Councils. These latter proposals would finally constitute the basis of the State College of Victoria Act. In 1970, the Minister of Education established the Victorian Fourth University Committee which considered the possibility of established teachers' colleges forming a multi-campus fourth university. However the question of the relationship between a fourth university and teachers' colleges was left unresolved by a substantially divided committee, so the Minister accepted the view of the V.F.U.C., supported by the V.A.P.T.C. and the C.T.C.S.A.(V.) that the colleges establish a separate co-ordinating authority. The Minister established a Committee of Advice to help implement the proposal. In the meantime, the Commonwealth Government announced significant policy alterations to the funding of teacher education. State teachers' colleges which were being developed as self-governing tertiary institutions under the supervision of an appropriate co-ordinating authority would be funded on the same basis as universities and colleges of advanced education. By the end of 1972 the State College of Victoria Act was passed by the Victorian Government. The teachers' colleges outside Education Department control, which included Melbourne Kindergarten Teachers' College, four Catholic teachers' colleges and Mercer House (Associated Teachers' Training Institution), had actively participated in the negotiations for an independent co-ordinating authority. With the support of the State Government and the funding of the Commonwealth Government, Melbourne Kindergarten Teachers' College had little difficulty negotiating entry as a foundation member of the S.C.V. Four Catholic teachers' colleges joined together to form the Institute of Catholic Education and applied for admission as a single entity to the S.C.V. Negotiations for its entry, which extended over eighteen months, were finally successful. Its success was considerably enhanced when the Commonwealth Government offered funding to approved 'private' teachers' colleges. In the meantime, Mercer House negotiated for entry to the S.C.V. as a separate entity without success, but finally agreed to amalgamate with the S.C.V. at Toorak in 1975.
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    A comparative study of three state colleges of Victoria - Burwood, Frankston, Toorak, 1973-1976
    Nielsen, Geoffrey Arthur ( 1977)
    On the 25 October 1972, Lindsay Thompson, the minister for Education, introduced into the Legislative Assembly of the Victorian State Parliament a Bill that was to create the State College of Victoria. Under this legislation the State Teachers' Colleges ceased to be administered by the Education Department and became an autonomous body in tertiary education. The aim of this thesis is to study the background to the formation of this institution. To look at the struggle for independence fought by individuals and associations connected with the Teachers' colleges and the lengthy enquiries and official panels established by the government. Chapters two, three and four are studies of three constituent colleges of the S.C.V., Burwood, Frankston and Toorak, in regard to their courses, staffing, organization and finance. following the gathering of this material an attempt is made to juxtapose these elements of the three colleges during the first three years of their independence, to try to establish similarities and differences in the data gathered. Comparative analysis is then attempted to draw conclusions regarding the progress, objectives, growth or setbacks the colleges have experienced and to try and establish why such results are evident. Finally two major questions are discussed. What is the future of the State College of Victoria system and what is the future of the individual colleges under study. To try and fathom out these problems the opinions of several people closely connected with the S.C.V. system and the Victorian Education Department were sought. The answers to both questions at this stage remain suppositions for they are presently under formal review by two State Government committees.
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    Responses of government and Catholic educational authorities to the influx of migrants, 1950-1960, with special reference to the experience of a selected group of schools conducted by the Victorian Sisters of Mercy
    O'Dwyer, Carmel Helen ( 1977)
    local parish priest; the day-to-day education was left completely to those dedicated religious and their lay assistants who faced the challenge with resolute courage. One such group of religious were the Sisters of Mercy. A major focus of this study is their efforts in the field of migrant education with special reference to three schools for which they mere responsible. With neither the time nor expertise to develop a specific philosophy of migrant education they relied on traditional methods of classroom teaching - methods in which they had fortunately been well-grounded. The effect of such teaching can be partially gauged from the responses of one hundred of their students.
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    The establishment and operation of school councils in Victorian government high schools, 1973-1978
    McKinnon, Ian Douglas ( 1979)
    In 1976 reforms to the administration of Victorian government schools were instituted in response to pressure from political and education theorists, Education Department officials, parents and teachers. Advocates for reform were critical of a centralized and hierarchically administered education system which, they felt, was unresponsive to the needs of people affected by it - parents, teachers and students. Pressure for reforms to permit more broadly based participation in the administration of public institutions was responsible, between 1965 and 1973, for the granting of teacher autonomy in curriculum development. Finance was also allocated to schools by federal and state governments to enable them to define community needs and develop facilities to provide for those needs. Advisory councils came to be seen as too limited in powers and composition to effectively discharge these new responsibilities. Consequently, in 1973, the movement for reform of school councils commenced with discussions and negotiations between ministers, Education Department officials, representatives of parent, teacher and student organisations and interested groups in schools. These discussions were to result in the reform of the powers and composition of school councils and the election of newly constituted councils late in 1976. This study describes that reform movement and isolates the expectations of the advocates for reform. Interviews with principals and questionnaires administered to all councillors in nine high schools in the Ballarat Regional Directorate enable an analysis of the extent to which those expectations have been fulfilled over two years of operation of a limited sample of reformed councils from 1976 to 1978. Although new councils are now more representative and more actively involved in school administration the study shows that parental interest is still low, councils are not representative of all groups in society, and their powers are still too restrictive to allow them to influence the content and methods of instruction. These findings direct attention to the need for more detailed studies of community expectations for involvement in schools as well as careful analysis of decentralization of school government in view of the failure of the initial representative procedures in school councils.
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    High schools with technical components: the first decade, 1969-1978
    Johnston, Christopher Terence ( 1978)
    Historically, state post-primary education in Victoria has been shared between the Technical Schools Divsion and the Secondary Schools Division, with each establishing separate schools in proximity to the other. However, by the late 1960's, country centres without technical schools were seen to have potential student populations too small to justify a technical school in addition to the existing high school. Yet in certain of these small centres a vocal demand existed for technical education, this demand originating from a variety of sources. The response was to place technical studies in existing high schools. The schools developed integrated courses over all levels, and significant educational advantages were claimed from this. However, the location of technical components was determined not so much by educational ideas, as by a reaction to community stimulus. This was illustrated in the development of policy concerning technical components, for it was aggregative in nature, adapting to changing pressures and circumstances. The technical component innovation did not occur in isolation. Curriculum developments which occurred in both Divisions, facilitated it, and the associated reduction in external control of schools was but one of a number of other factors which provided encouragement. Both the development and some current features of high schools with technical components are examined, as is their future. It appears that their numbers will not expand significantly, particularly as alternative responses to demands for technical education have been implemented. The future of high schools with existing technical components is also unclear, in part due to the possibility of restructuring in the Education Department.
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    The attitudes of teaching college students to the role of primary teacher
    Hopkins, Brian ( 1978)
    The particular problem chosen here was one of 'normative consensus': to what extent were 150 second year students in the State College of Victoria at Geelong in agreement as to the forms of behaviour which could be regarded as appropriate when acting the role of primary teacher? More specifically in this case how much consensus was there regarding the role of the primary teacher in given situations as seen through the students' eyes, and as they perceived the college lecturers and the practising teachers to view this role? The students were asked to complete a set of four role-norm inventories developed by Foskett (1969). Each inventory contained 45 identical questions which examined four main areas of teaching, attitude to pupils (15 items) attitude to colleagues (10 items), attitude to parents (10 items) and 10 items concerning the teacher's attitude to the community. The students answered the inventories from four points of view: - R.N.I. 1 as they thought they ought to behave; R.N.I. 2 as they intended to behave when they began teaching; R.N.I. 3 as they thought the college lecturers would like them to behave and R.N.I. 4 as they thought practising teachers would behave. The norms and expectations were measured on a 5 point Likert-type scale. The data from the inventories were used to obtain the mean and standard deviation for each item. The means were then compared, item by item, to see if significant differences existed between the various role-setting at .01 level of significance. There was one item of significant difference between R.N.I 1 and R.N.I. 2, 12 between R.N.I. 1 and R.N.I. 3 and 21 between R.N.I. 1 and R.N.I. 4. The results indicated that students tended to identify with their college lecturers and to be opposed to the way they perceived teachers to behave, especially in the area of classroom interaction. Various weaknesses of the research methods employed were examined but nonetheless the evidence that the process of teacher training might serve to produce conflict between the novitiate teacher and the school was considered strong enough to warrant further investigation.
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    TAFE staff profile: an analysis of the characteristics, attitudes and opinions of the teaching staff of Swinburne Technical College
    Gullan, Robert ( 1977)
    For sometime, Technical and Further Education (TAFE) has been the most neglected area of post secondary education, not only has TAFE not been given an equitable share of available funds, but it has been prevented from meeting the demands being placed upon it, and consequently has been unable to carry out its role effectively. Swinburne Technical College (STC) is a TAFE college and it seems to represent the general depressed state of this area of education. Currently within STC are 95 full time teachers catering for 3,500 students in four major areas; Building, Business, Engineering and General Studies. However, STC has no permanent buildings, all of the teaching being undertaken in rented facilities of Swinburne College of Technology - a College of Advanced Education, or in a variety of other leased or portable buildings. As the experiences, qualifications, attitudes, opinions and expectations of teachers have a direct bearing on the type or quality of educational programs, it would appear that, in view of the constraints being imposed on the teachers of STC, knowledge of such factors is essential if STC is to carry out its role effectively. The aim of this investigation is to develop such a profile of the teachers of STC by examining three areas of teacher involvement (i) Academic, personal and career details (ii) Attitudes and opinions to employment at STC (iii) Attitudes, opinions and expectations to TAFE as a separate sector of post secondary education. In understanding such an examination consideration is given to (i) identifying the nature and extent of some of the problems facing the teachers of STC in attempting to fulfil their teaching function. (ii) presenting the expressed attitudes and opinions of the teachers towards these problem areas. (iii) attempting to identify some of the relationships that may exist between problem areas. The information necessary to develop such a profile was gained by administering a questionnaire, consisting mainly of fixed alternative items with five alternative responses, to all available teachers of STC. As 72 teachers, of a possible 87, responded to the questionnaire, giving a return rate of 83%, the information gained and the profile developed was taken to be representative of the STC.
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    Continuing education for farmers in Victorian agricultural colleges
    Carnegie, Alastair B ( 1977)
    The rural industries are undergoing major structural changes which are causing increasing pressures on farmers. One of the ways that farmers can cope with these changes is to become more professional in their management. Fewer young people are entering farming today and the average age of farmers is rising so tba.t the emphasis in agricultural education is shifting towards providing more continuing education for practising fanners. Post-secondary education is under increasing criticism from educators, Governments and society largely. because of its failure to provide equality of opportunity and for its emphasis on youth centred education at the expense. of adults. Lifelong education is now seen by many educators as the guiding principle which will enable everyone to have learning opportunities throughout their lifetime. Recurrent 'education is proposed as' an alternative educational strategy to permanent education and its theme is an alternation between education and other activities, such as work and. leisure, throughout life. A key feature of a system of recurrent education is that it is the Learner who controls the direction of the learning. This paper reports the results of a survey which set out to determine the needs for, and attitudes towards continuing. education amongst 200 practising farmers. It was found that educational attainment, youth, and other, farmer characteristics .were. positively related to participation and interest in continuing education. Agricultural colleges were seen as playing a vital role in providing opportunities for continuing education but that certain improvements in the planning, financing and timing of their activities would increase their use by farmers. There is an increasing need for TAFE, which is the ideal post-secondary, system for implementing the principles of recurrent education, to play a more active part than it has in supporting continuing education for farming. The big challenge Mt-Agricultural educators is. how to motivate- the- majority of farmers to participate in training. activities. This could be met initially by Government supported overbridging education.