Melbourne Graduate School of Education - Theses

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    The political ramifications of changes in the delivery of nursing education in Victoria
    Shepherd, Irwyn A ( 1993)
    The purpose of this research was to determine; whether, between 1974 and 1987, undergraduate Nursing education in the Colleges of Advanced Education tended to politicize the new recruits to the profession via curricula. whether those asked to participate in the research believed that there was a level of information being provided during their Nursing course which they considered to be political in nature. whether those asked to participate in the research believed that this level of information that they considered to be political in nature influenced their subsequent participation in activities which could be considered in turn to be political in nature. what constraints in the workplace were identified by those asked to participate in the research, which may have adversely effected any political activity they may have been involved in, or influenced by. whether there were any other real or conceptual factors not identified or not specifically addressed in the research which could have impacted on the research participants, and possibly influenced their responses, and thus, research outcomes. Subsequent to the research, the information obtained would be scrutinized for possible outcomes, ramifications and commented on. This process is more formerly addressed in the methodology.
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    The teaching of French in New South Wales and Victoria 1850-1958
    Wykes, Olive ( 1958)
    This thesis is a study of the development of the subject French at the Universities of Sydney and Melbourne and in the schools of New South Wales and Victoria. It seeks to show why French was taught in this land so far from France, by what methods it was taught, to whom and by whom it was taught. It was impossible to discover the answers to these questions without studying the growth of the two Universities and in particular the changes of curriculum in their Faculties of Arts, the relationship between the Universities and the schools and the influence of the University Departments of French on French in the schools, the growth of secondary education and the public examination system, and the reforms in the curriculum of the secondary schools in the twentieth century as a result of changes in educational theory and philosophy. Only against this background is it possible to understand the rise and fall of one particular subject.
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    An administrative review of the Commonwealth English as a Second Language (ESL) Program within the Office of Schools Administration, Ministry of Education, Victoria
    Symonds, David George ( 1990)
    This thesis presents an administrative review of the Commonwealth English as a Second Language (ESL) Program within the Office of Schools Administration, Ministry of Education, Victoria. The approach and framework adopted are similar to those used by Campbell et al. in their review of the Commonwealth ESL Program for the Commonwealth Schools Commission in 1984. There are no prejudgements concerning major issues, but an interest in monitoring events from program establishment at a Commonwealth level to program organisation issues in schools. A number of "Levels of Administrative Reality" are identified through which the following educational agencies are examined - the Department of Employment, Education and Training (DEET), the Office of Schools Adminstration, and schools. The "Levels of Administrative Reality" used are Intentions, Structure, Resource Allocations Mechanisms, and Program Organisation. These are considered broad enough to enable major issues to be raised. Data have been collected over a two year period from a variety of sources including policy documents, questionnaires, memoranda and minutes of meetings. Major issues raised include : (a) the development of a nationwide curriculum framework/syllabus for the teaching of ESL; (b) the location of ESL within the Office of Schools Administration; (c) the location of consultancy support to schools; (d) the level of resourcing; (e) the qualifications of ESL teachers.
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    The learning needs of non-English-speaking-background student nurses
    Rebeiro, Geraldine ( 1998)
    This thesis has investigated the learning needs of non-English-speaking-background (NESB) students in a tertiary nursing course and whether they are being met. It has reviewed literature predominently from Australia, Britain and the USA. Whilst there are similarites it has been recognised that all situations are not the same so the literature has been used appropritely to establish the theoretical framework for the study and in the support of the research findings. Qualitative methodology has been used focusing on observation, survey, and interview methods from two groups studied, ie., NESB students and academics. The findings from the two groups researched, are expressed as results; from students who have analysed that their learning as affected by predominently academic factors, such as reading and writing for assessments and professional documentation, and on a minor level by language and cultural expectations in relation to teaching/learning. Academic findings support students responses but also identify some professional nursing issues such as expectations of students as affecting the learning needs of these students. The recommendations of this thesis are to provide better academic support for NESB students and to effect greater academic and university awareness of the learning needs of NESB students.
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    An analysis of education provision to older non-English speaking background youth with minimal or interrupted schooling in the Richmond/Collingwood area
    Polesel, John ( 1987)
    This study is an analysis of educational provision in the Richmond/Coilingwood area for young people aged 16 to 24 years of age, of migrant or refugee background, who have a history of minimal or interrupted schooling. These students are mostly of Indo-Chinese or Timorese background , and face severe problems relating to their lack of literacy and poor English proficiency. Many of these students are unaccompanied refugees and face economic hardship in Australia. Educational programs running in five postprimary schools, two TAFE colleges and two language centres are examined in light of their relevance to the needs of these students. It emerges from this study that a small number of institutions provide responsive quality programs for this group. There are, however, general problems relating to the low status and marginalization of ESL programs in most of the institutions. These problems are compounded by a lack of funding, unsympathetic administration, ignorance of the issues and difficulties relating to accreditation. In some institutions, no provision at all is made for these students. Needs emerging from these issues may be summarized as follows. A greater awareness of the educational requirements. of this group must be developed. An informed collaborative approach must be adopted to respond to these needs in the form of appropriate ESL programs. Policy and administrative support must be forthcoming to assist in achieving these goals.
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    The selection and role of literary texts in the ESL classroom
    Yeoh, Siew Im ( 1995)
    This study investigated five secondary teachers selection of literary texts and perception of the role literature plays in the ESL language classroom. The teachers were chosen from four schools in the Melbourne metropolitan area and were interviewed individually except for one school where two teachers were interviewed for the research. The interviews were tape recorded and transcribed and formed the main body of data As supplementary data interviews were also conducted with ten students (one 'good student and one weak student chosen by each teacher). The case studies revealed that criteria for text selection were related to considerations for students needs features of the text the teachers preferences in reading practical issues related to the availability of text and examination requirements. The research confirmed the perceptions of writers on this area who have maintained that literature is often used as a context for generating language activities and for imparting knowledge about the target culture The data also found that literature was used to affirm the students own cultural identities.
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    Art and community schools in Victoria : a focus on the Artists and Architects in Schools Programs as models in evaluating negotiation and participatory decision making as a basis for developing arts curricula
    Saulwick, Jenifer Ann ( 1990)
    This study has argued that the learning context should be linked not only with the student's growing knowledge and skill within the curriculum but it should also allow for an understanding of how that curriculum connects and relates with the democratic society of work and leisure. It is further argued, that as, a consequence of arriving at that understanding; students acquire a sense of empowerment and control over their lives. In Chapter 1, the study establishes the historical background to the Artists and Architects in Schools Programs, and the role of the art teacher and the artists and architects within those programs. As an introduction, Chapter 1 also briefly explains the following Chapters. Chapter 2 discusses the history and development of the state community school movement, its-establishment in Victoria, and the radical nature of its underpinnings. Reference is also made to the private alternative school movement. In Chapter 3, the process. of decision making in Croydon Community School and Sherbrooke Community School in respect to their Artists in Schools Programs is examined. In Chapter 4, the issues discussed are: three orientations to the curriculum, the American Discipline Based Art Education, and the recent curriculum guidelines of the Victorian. Ministry of Education. A comparison is made of the approaches to learning and negotiating the curriculum between Swinburne Community School and Croydon Community School. Finally a summary is presented of negotiation and the arts integration of the curriculum during the Artists and Architects in Schools Programs at Croydon Community School in 1982. In Chapter 5 some of the movements towards participatory democracy throughout the 20th century in industry and in social, political and business institutions by workers, residents and other concerned groups through control by that means of the workplace, the means of production, and the neighbourhood are examined. Reference is made to their philosophic basis and the parallel movement of the community schools in Victoria. In Chapter 6 the history of the development of the Artists and Architects in Schools Programs is examined. Comparison with and evaluation of the criticism of the British and American Programs is also included to illuminate the role of the art teacher and the artists and architects. In Chapter 7, the arts integration of the timetable for both the Artists and Architects in Schools Programs at Croydon Community School in 1982 and 1983 is evaluated: Note is also taken of the consistent philosophic approach. A brief comparison is made with other Artists and Architects in Schools Programs to elucidate the theme of whole school community involvement. In Chapter 8, Community Arts, have been defined and discussed in relation to the ideologies that motivate the management of community schools. Note has also been taken of community arts practice in Britain and America as a comparison with the Australian context. The potential for the relationship of the community artist with the community school is also evaluated. In Chapter 9, a Creative Arts Curriculum Model for Community Schools has been designed to provide a comprehensive arts curriculum with a contextual basis for the growth of the whole person. The design allows for decision making through participation to be practised to provide the framework for the development of an arts curriculum relevant to contemporary society in the 1990's. In concluding, Chapter 10 has examined, evaluated and clarified a number of key themes which are the central elements to the writer's thoughts. These are: the role of negotiation and participatory decision making in developing a democratic curriculum, and the role of art within that context. Observation is also made on the way the themes relate to the events of the 'real world'. A brief note is made of possible areas for further research. Finally, a comment is made on the relevance of the community school in the reorganised system of the Victorian Ministry of Education forward into the 1990's.
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    Secondary art teachers' perceptions of a regional art gallery
    Sutterby, Catherine J ( 2004)
    This study examines the view of five teachers in relation to their use of a regional gallery within their art program. Using qualitative inquiry, the study focuses on interviews with the gallery educator and five secondary teachers within the region. The key purpose of the study is to identify the value and reasons why teachers incorporate gallery visits into their teaching program.
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    A cartoon chemistry text : the construction and testing of a novel chemistry text incorporating human values
    Werry, R. John ( 1990)
    This study examines current science texts and the concerns and objectives of Science-Technology-Society based courses. It indicates that they present the public image of the practising scientist (with inherent Mertonian values of Universalism, Communism, Disinterestedness, and organized skepticism) which is used to organize scientific concepts into a meaningful whole. Utilizing the notion that a value is anything important to a student, a hypothesis was proposed that meaning and interest generated from a text is dependent on the extent of overlap between text and student values. The implications of the interaction of different value systems with a Mertonian based text were considered. An attempt was made to develop a chemistry text that was meaningful to all students, by organizing concepts into a story form with non-Mertonian organization. This approach evolved into a cartoon format with specific features. Two cartoon text items were tested at two schools. The trial involved a survey item on 103 students and audio taped interviews with 20 students. The trial attempted to evaluate the cartoon as a student text, attitudes to issues content, and styles of resolving issues based conflicts. The results were interpreted by classifying the respondents into four categories of science likingness ( A, B, C, D) on the basis of Year 11 subject choice, and favorite subject. It was assumed that the accommodation of Mertonian values by a group reflected the science likingness of the group. The cartoon text was well received with most students wishing to see more cartoons, and being able to answer questions from the text. The B, C, and D groups expressed a preference for the cartoon text over their current science text. The proposed differential accommodation of values appeared to account for the greater enthusiasm of the B and C groups for the cartoons than the A and D groups. Perceptions of the amount of current social problems/ issues content in science teaching increased markedly with group science likingness. The amount of issues content desired decreased with increasing group science likingness. A belief that scientific solutions could resolve social problems/ issues, showed a marked decrease with decreasing science likingness. A value model of cognitive style was developed from the basic hypothesis and assumptions regarding the extent of accommodation of Mertonian and Humanist norms as personal values. This model seemed to account for variations in meaning generated for the various groups in response to both the standard and cartoon science text format.