Infrastructure Engineering - Research Publications

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    A new vision on cadastral data model
    Kalantari, Mohsen ; RAJABIFARD, ABBAS ; WALLACE, JUDE ; WILLIAMSON, IAN ( 2006)
    Land administration systems are evolving towards an integrated land management paradigm designed to support sustainable development. In this paradigm, land administration delivers four functionalities: land mapping, land registration, land valuation and land development, each with specific data elements, with the cadastral data model at the core. Cadastral data modelling potentially plays a key role in both data and business management in modern land administration systems. However, some modifications to existing data models could potentially improve their capacity to deliver sustainability. Firstly, the existing role of land parcels and properties as core building blocks in land administration systems can be significantly extended to make the cadastral fabric available to assist management of a wider range of rights, restrictions and responsibilities by using the concept of legal property objects: an entity defined by a law or regulation which relates to a physical space on, below or above the earth. This can be interpreted as a new land related commodity, land parcel or a property. Secondly, although land parcel and property identifiers are key elements of interoperability within land administration subsystems, the paper argues that they have not yet given appropriate emphasis in cadastral data models. Among the identifiers, spatial identifiers can potentially simplify data exchange and work flows among land administration functionalities on a much wider basis. Finally, the paper discusses technical issues raised by changing the cadastral model: the advantages and disadvantages of spatial identifiers, possibilities for spatially presenting rights restrictions and responsibilities, and consistency between various legal property objects.
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    Re-engineering land administration systems for sustainable development: from rhetoric to reality
    Williamson, Ian P. ( 2001)
    Current land administration systems are the product of 19th century economic and land market paradigms and have failed to properly support sustainable development. The need for urgent reform is accepted, but the way forward unclear in many jurisdictions. This paper will discuss current international initiatives and research to develop a new land administration vision to promote sustainable development. Within this context, this paper describes the changing humankind to land relationship, identifies some of the growing environmental pressures facing modern society and the need for sustainable development, explores the evolving role of land administration in society and highlights the need for land administration systems to play a more proactive role in supporting sustainable development objectives. The process to re-engineer land administrations is briefly reviewed. The paper then highlights the development of a national land administration vision and strategy. In proposing strategies the paper draws on international trends and experiences such as highlighted in the recent United Nations - International Federation of Surveyors Declaration on Land Administration for Sustainable Development.
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    The role of land administration in the accession of Central European countries to the European Union
    Bogaerts, T ; Williamson, IP ; Fendel, EM (ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2002-01-01)
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    Future directions for Spatial Information Management in Australia-a land administration perspective
    Williamson, I. P. ( 1999)
    Future directions for spatial information management in Australia, from a land administrationperspective, are discussed. Sustainable development, micro-economic reform, globalisation andtechnology are highlighted as the drivers for change. The changing spatial information environment withemphasis on land administration and cadastral issues is examined by drawing on research beingundertaken at the University of Melbourne. Issues concerned with future land administrationinfrastructures such as the changing humankind to land relationship, cadastral reform and native title arehighlighted. Specific cadastral and land administration issues and technologies which impact on spatialinformation strategies are reviewed, including understanding the business-infrastructure relationship inspatial information management, modelling the maintenance of cadastral systems, the changing nature ofspatial data infrastructures, the spatial hierarchy problem, the importance of developing partnerships andthe impact of communications and WWW technologies. The paper concludes by emphasising that anygovernment spatial information strategy is intimately linked to land administration and is influenced byglobal drivers such as sustainable development, micro-economic reform and globalisation, as well astechnology. Understanding the inter-dependence between these global drivers is a key to successfulspatial information management strategies.
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    Land administration, spatial systems and citiesan Australian perspective
    Williamson, I. P. ( 1999)
    The paper argues that any spatial information strategy for urban, local government orcity jurisdiction is intimately linked to and influenced by the state or national landadministration and cadastral systems where it is located. It is these state or nationalsystems which usually provide the spatial infrastructure for urban information systems.Therefore to understand current trends in urban information systems, changes and trendsin state and national land administration systems must also be understood. The paperaddresses this topic by exploring the changing humankind-land relationship and theglobal drivers of sustainable development, micro-economic reform, globalisation andtechnology, with emphasis on Australian state spatial information systems. It draws onresearch being undertaken at the University of Melbourne to highlight some of thetrends and issues
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    The Evolution of Modern Cadastres
    WILLIAMSON, IP (International Federation of Surveyors, 2001)
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    United Nations-FIG Bathurst Declaration on Land Administrationfor Sustainable Development: Development and Impact
    Williamson, I. P. ; Grant, D. M. ( 2002)
    The joint United Nations-FIG Bathurst Declaration on Land Administration forSustainable Development was prepared at an International Workshop on CadastralInfrastructures for Sustainable Development organized jointly by the FIG and theUnited Nations in Bathurst, New South Wales, Australia, on 18-22 October 1999.The Declaration was presented formally together with position papers prepared asbackground for the Workshop at an International Conference in Melbourne, Australia,on 25-27 October 1999. The Workshop and Conference, together with the resultingDeclaration, were part of the Work Plan of Commission 7 (Cadastre and LandManagement) and were three years in the planning.The paper will review the activities leading up to the Workshop, Conference anddevelopment of the Declaration, and will discuss the impact of the Declaration.Following on from the Workshop and Conference, presentations were made at variousUnited Nations conferences as well as the FIG General Assembly. In addition therehave been numerous workshops and conference spawned by the Declaration. Thepaper will also look to the future to consider how the Bathurst Declaration can be builtupon to the benefit of all countries as well as professional surveyors. Importantly thepaper will discuss the impact of the overriding outcome from this initiative in that ithas stated a clear relationship between land administration and sustainabledevelopment.
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    National land information infrastructure through a collaborative framework
    Marwick, Brian ; RAJABIFARD, ABBAS ; Kalantari, Mohsen ; WILLIAMSON, IAN (International Federation of Surveyors (FIG), 2012)
    Australia is being faced with issues which demand a national focus. These issues include natural resource management, land markets, trading in commodities such as water and carbon, and the development of national policies for housing and infrastructure. Businesses also are demanding a more national approach as an increasing number of businesses now operate nationally. This is reflected in the Australian Bureau of Statistics figures which show the number of businesses operating in all states and territories increased by 70% between 2003 and 2007. Over the past several years considerable effort has been directed by the Australian Government towards the development of a “seamless economy” to improve productivity across its federated system of government. In this environment, Land administration in Australia is also jurisdictionally based with no national infrastructure capable of delivering the land information necessary to meet Australia’s needs. In the past, this jurisdictional based approach to land administration has satisfactorily served Australia in an environment where the vast amount of service delivery by both business and government was state focused. Each jurisdiction has taken advantage of the ongoing technological developments to enhance their respective systems and it would appear that many of the needs at a jurisdictional level continue to be met. Whilst land administration has not featured specifically in this reform several of the nominated projects involved land in some form. To respond to the national drivers, this paper aims to introduce a collaborative framework for the implementation of a national land administration infrastructure which relies on the state and territory based systems as its primary source of information.
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    Spatial needs of societies
    STEUDLER, DANIEL ; RAJABIFARD, ABBAS (International Federation of Surveyors (FIG), 2012)
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    The role of land administration, land management and land governance in spatially enabled societies
    STEUDLER, DANIEL ; RAJABIFARD, ABBAS (International Federation of Surveyors (FIG), 2012)
    Over the last 15-20 years, the topic of cadastre and land registration has been discussed extensively. The FIG-statement on the cadastre (FIG, 1995) established that the "cadastre assists in the management of land and land use, and enables sustainable development and environmental protection". In the 1990s the UN-ECE (1996) coined the term "land administration" in order to express the broader need and use of land information for managing the land as an asset. The Bathurst Declaration concluded in 1999 that sustainable development is the key driver influencing the humankind to land relationship and that it needs sound land administration (UN-FIG, 1999).