Infrastructure Engineering - Research Publications

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    A field test to demonstrate the benefit of cool roof paints in a temperate climate
    JENSEN, C ; Hes, D ; Aye, L ; Schnabel, MA (The Architectural Science Association, 2013)
    This volume contains the refereed papers of the 47th International Architectural Science Association Conference 2013, held at the School of Architecture, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, China, They provide a snapshot of current cutting ...
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    Passive and Low Energy Buildings
    Aye, L ; Jayalath, A ; Shukla, A ; Sharma, A (CRC Press (Taylor & Francis Group), 2018)
    Better energy efficiency in buildings can be achieved with active, passive and combined strategies. This chapter presents and discusses design strategies for passive and low energy buildings. Passive buildings fall under low energy building where special design criteria is in place to reduce the operational energy consumption in a building. Passive and low energy technologies can provide satisfactory thermal comfort in non-airconditioned buildings. Passive buildings strategies include heat gain prevention, heat modulation and heat dissipation. Building envelope aspects such as walls, glazing, roof, insulation, thermal mass, and shading are discussed. Low energy cooling technologies: ground cooling and night ventilation are presented. Embodied energy aspect of these technologies is also briefly discussed. Proper architectural design of building envelope along with passive cooling strategies which are appropriate for the local climate conditions can significantly improve the energy efficiency and reduce the related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. CONTENTS 4.1 Introduction 4.2 Design Strategies and Performance Parameters of Passive and Low Energy Buildings 4.2.1 Walls 4.2.2 Glazing 4.2.3 Roof 4.2.4 Thermal Insulation, Thermal Mass and Phase Change Materials 4.2.5 Ground Cooling 4.2.6 Night Ventilation 4.3 Embodied Energy 4.4 Conclusions References
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    How Could Sustainability Transition Theories Support Practice-Based Strategic Planning?
    Bush, J ; Aye, L ; Hes, D ; Murfitt, P ; Moore, T ; de Haan, F ; Horne, R ; Gleeson, B (Springer, 2018-01-01)
    Theories of sustainability transitions aim to explain the processes, pathways and actors that are involved in transformations in technologies and practices. Whilst there is a growing body of research developing theoretical understandings, there has been less documented on how theories are utilised and applied by practitioners themselves. This chapter reports on a case study that investigated whether provision of targeted information on theories of sustainability transitions could strengthen organisational strategic planning. If planning is informed by transition theories, would this assist and strengthen organisational visioning, ambition and confidence? The research focuses on Moreland Energy Foundation Limited (MEFL), a community-based not-for-profit organisation working on sustainable energy and climate change action in Melbourne, Australia. During 2014–2015, MEFL developed a new strategic plan. As part of this process, theories of sustainability transitions were presented to the organisation’s Board and staff, to support the strategic planning and to investigate the theories’ roles in the planning process. It was found that inclusion of the sustainability transitions theoretical framework led to the organisation explicitly defining its shared ‘model of change’, reinforcing the organisation’s conceptualisation of its role as an ‘intermediary’ between grassroots and governments. The process demonstrated the potential impact of research-practice partnerships in strategic planning. However the findings also highlighted the continuing challenges of connecting research and practice.
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    Green Plot Ratio and MUtopia: The integration of green infrastructure into an ecological model for cities
    Ong, BL ; Fryd, O ; Hes, D ; Ngo, T ; AYE, L ; Bay, JHP ; Lehmann, S (Routledge - Taylor & Francis, 2017-07-06)
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    An Integrated Simulation and Visualisation Platform for the Design of Sustainable Urban Developments in a Peri-Urban Context
    Arora, M ; Tuan, N ; Aye, L ; Malano, H ; Lade, O ; Maheshwari, B ; Singh, VP ; Thoradeniya, B (SPRINGER INTERNATIONAL PUBLISHING AG, 2016-01-01)
    Designing sustainable urban development is a multi-dimensional and multi-disciplinary challenge that can benefit from next-generation modelling tools to achieve high performance outcomes and integrated assessments. This chapter presents and demonstrates the use of ‘MUtopia’, an information modelling platform for assessing alternative urban development scenarios. The use of the platform is illustrated through the application to a peri-urban development in the city of Melbourne, Australia. The modelling platform allows simulation of various transition and future scenarios at the precinct level. The platform is capable of extracting data to assist in developing and assessing the performance of different components (land use, individual buildings and infrastructure related to energy and water supply and use, waste management and transport systems) by taking advantage of the platform’s unique scalability. The selected case study is a 31.5 ha Parcel of land, a typical peri-urban development in Melbourne’s fringe located in West Cranbourne. A key aspect of the development is the design of a sustainable precinct that is affordable, provides a greater level of amenity and incorporates biolink corridors and natural open spaces critical to the preservation of native biodiversity. As a low rise suburban development this project presents a unique opportunity for the application of the MUtopia platform and to demonstrate how the tool can lead to optimum design parameters for achieving sustainable development. This chapter also describes how MUtopia can be used to optimise the selection and design of sustainable and resilient energy, water and waste infrastructure and its integration with existing infrastructure.
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    Chapter 11: Cool Roof Retrofits as an Alternative to Green Roofs
    Hes, D ; Jensen, CA ; Aye, L ; Wilkinson, S ; Dixon, T (John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., 2016-07-22)
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