Infrastructure Engineering - Research Publications

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    A synthetic study to evaluate the utility of hydrological signatures for calibrating a base flow separation filter
    Su, C-H ; Peterson, TJ ; Costelloe, JF ; Western, AW (AMER GEOPHYSICAL UNION, 2016-08-01)
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    Can we manage groundwater? A method to determine the quantitative testability of groundwater management plans
    White, EK ; Peterson, TJ ; Costelloe, J ; Western, AW ; Carrara, E (AMER GEOPHYSICAL UNION, 2016-06-01)
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    On the structural limitations of recursive digital filters for base flow estimation
    Su, C-H ; Costelloe, JF ; Peterson, TJ ; Western, AW (AMER GEOPHYSICAL UNION, 2016-06-01)
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    Equifinality and Flux Mapping: A New Approach to Model Evaluation and Process Representation Under Uncertainty
    Khatami, S ; Peel, MC ; Peterson, TJ ; Western, AW (AMER GEOPHYSICAL UNION, 2019-11-12)
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    Statistical Interpolation of Groundwater Hydrographs
    Peterson, TJ ; Western, AW (AMER GEOPHYSICAL UNION, 2018-07-01)
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    Equifinality and process-based modelling
    Khatami, S ; Peel, M ; Peterson, T ; Western, A (American Geophysical Union, 2018-11-26)
    Equifinality is understood as one of the fundamental difficulties in the study of open complex systems, including catchment hydrology. A review of the hydrologic literature reveals that the term equifinality has been widely used, but in many cases inconsistently and without coherent recognition of the various facets of equifinality, which can lead to ambiguity but also methodological fallacies. Therefore, in this study we first characterise the term equifinality within the context of hydrological modelling by reviewing the genesis of the concept of equifinality and then presenting a theoretical framework. During past decades, equifinality has mainly been studied as a subset of aleatory (arising due to randomness) uncertainty and for the assessment of model parameter uncertainty. Although the connection between parameter uncertainty and equifinality is undeniable, we argue there is more to equifinality than just aleatory parameter uncertainty. That is, the importance of equifinality and epistemic uncertainty (arising due to lack of knowledge) and their implications is overlooked in our current practice of model evaluation. Equifinality and epistemic uncertainty in studying, modelling, and evaluating hydrologic processes are treated as if they can be simply discussed in (or often reduced to) probabilistic terms (as for aleatory uncertainty). The deficiencies of this approach to conceptual rainfall-runoff modelling are demonstrated for selected Australian catchments by examination of parameter and internal flux distributions and interactions within SIMHYD. On this basis, we present a new approach that expands equifinality concept beyond model parameters to inform epistemic uncertainty. The new approach potentially facilitates the identification and development of more physically plausible models and model evaluation schemes particularly within the multiple working hypotheses framework, and is generalisable to other fields of environmental modelling as well.
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    Simulating runoff under changing climatic conditions: Revisiting an apparent deficiency of conceptual rainfall-runoff models
    Fowler, KJA ; Peel, MC ; Western, AW ; Zhang, L ; Peterson, TJ (AMER GEOPHYSICAL UNION, 2016-03-01)
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    Estimating aquifer properties using groundwater hydrograph modelling
    Shapoori, V ; Peterson, T ; Western, A ; COSTELLOE, J (Wiley: 12 months, 2015)
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    Groundwater surface mapping informs sources of catchment baseflow
    Costelloe, JF ; PETERSON, T ; Halbert, K ; Western, AW ; McDonnell, JJ (European Geosciences Union, 2015)
    Abstract. Groundwater discharge is a major contributor to stream baseflow. Quantifying this flux is difficult, despite its considerable importance to water resource management and evaluation of the effects of groundwater extraction on streamflow. It is important to be able to differentiate between contributions to streamflow from regional groundwater discharge (more susceptible to groundwater extraction) compared to interflow processes (arguably less susceptible to groundwater extraction). Here we explore the use of groundwater surface mapping as an independent data set to constrain estimates of groundwater discharge to streamflow using traditional digital filter and tracer techniques. We developed groundwater surfaces from 88 monitoring bores using Kriging with external drift and for a subset of 33 bores with shallow screen depths. Baseflow estimates at the catchment outlet were made using the Eckhardt digital filter approach and tracer data mixing analysis using major ion signatures. Our groundwater mapping approach yielded two measures (percentage area intersecting the land surface and monthly change in saturated volume) that indicated that digital filter-derived baseflow significantly exceeded probable groundwater discharge during most months. Tracer analysis was not able to resolve contributions from ungauged tributary flows (sourced from either shallow flow paths, i.e. interflow and perched aquifer discharge, or regional groundwater discharge) and regional groundwater. Groundwater mapping was able to identify ungauged sub-catchments where regional groundwater discharge was too deep to contribute to tributary flow and thus where shallow flow paths dominated the tributary flow. Our results suggest that kriged groundwater surfaces provide a useful, empirical and independent data set for investigating sources of fluxes contributing to baseflow and identifying periods where baseflow analysis may overestimate groundwater discharge to streamflow.