Infrastructure Engineering - Research Publications

Permanent URI for this collection

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 15
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Spatial information opportunities for government
    Wallace, J ; Williamson, IP ; Rajabifard, A ; Bennett, R (Informa UK Limited, 2006-01-01)
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Integrated land administration in Australia : the need to align ICT strategies and operations
    Bennett, Rohan ; WALLACE, JUDE ; WILLIAMSON, IAN ( 2005)
    A modern Land Administration System consists of four key functions: land tenure, land valuation, land use and land development. The integration of these functions and associated land information are essential if we are to achieve sustainability objectives and a more efficient property development process. Historically many countries have divided up their key functions; the advent of information and communication technologies [ICT] offered the possibility of integration. Current research suggests that land administration functions have resisted integration, despite technological advancements. This paper analyses such findings by considering the land administration functions of Victoria, Western Australia and New South Wales. It considers each state’s spatial-mapping and registry functions at a strategic and operational level. Particular attention has been given to ICT policy and operations. The study suggests that many factor shave obstructed integration, including historical backgrounds, politics and disparate organizational cultures have all played a role. Another important factor has been the failure to align the ICT strategies and operations of the different functions: land registries have tended to view technology as supporting core operations rather than core strategy. Conversely, spatial-mapping units see ICT as fundamental to operations and strategy: not only has ICT enhanced traditional practice, but it has also allowed for the creation of new products and services. It is argued that in order to achieve further integration, Land Administration functions must align their perception and use of ICT. Shared leadership, integrated ICT infrastructures and government mandates will assist this alignment.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Integrated land administration in Australia: the need to align ICT strategies and operations
    Bennett, Rohan ; WALLACE, JUDE ; WILLIAMSON, IAN ( 2005)
    A modern Land Administration System consists of four key functions: land tenure, land valuation, land use and landdevelopment. The integration of these functions and associated land information are essential if we are to achievesustainability objectives and a more efficient property development process. Historically many countries have dividedup their key functions; the advent of information and communication technologies [ICT] offered the possibility ofintegration.Current research suggests that land administration functions have resisted integration, despite technologicaladvancements. This paper analyses such findings by considering the land administration functions of Victoria, WesternAustralia and New South Wales. It considers each state'sspatial-mapping and registry functions at a strategic andoperational level. Particular attention has been given to ICT policy and operations. The study suggests that many factorshave obstructed integration, including historical backgrounds, politics and disparate organizational cultures have allplayed a role. Another important factor has been the failure to align the ICT strategies and operations of the differentfunctions: land registries have tended to view technology as supporting core operations rather than core strategy.Conversely, spatial-mapping units see ICT as fundamental to operations and strategy: not only has ICT enhancedtraditional practice, but it has also allowed for the creation of new products and services. It is argued that in order toachieve further integration, Land Administration functions must align their perception and use of ICT. Sharedleadership, integrated ICT infrastructures and government mandates will assist this alignment.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Organising land information for sustainable land administration
    Bennett, R ; Wallace, J ; Williamson, I (ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2008-01-01)
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    On recognizing land administration as critical, public good infrastructure
    Bennett, R ; Tambuwala, N ; Rajabifard, A ; Wallace, J ; Williamson, I (ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2013-01-01)
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    A national vision for Australian land registries
    BENNETT, ROHAN ; RAJABIFARD, ABBAS ; WILLIAMSON, IAN ; WALLACE, JUDE ; Marwick, Brian ( 2011)
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Understanding the relationship between spatial information, property markets and macroeconomic policy
    Tambuwala, N ; Bennett, RM ; Rajabifard, A ; Williamson, IP (Surveying & Spatial Sciences Institute, 2011)
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Spatially enabled society
    WILLIAMSON, IAN ; RAJABIFARD, ABBAS ; WALLACE, JUDE ; BENNETT, ROHAN (International Federation of Surveyors (FIG), 2011)
    The term 'spatially enabled society' describes the emerging cultural and governance revolution offered by pervasive spatial information technologies and spatially equipped citizens. Spatially enabled societies make possible, amongst many other things, sustainable cities, GFC early warning systems, smarter delivery of housing, improved risk management, and better macroeconomic decision making. The concept is not about managing spatial information, it is about governing society spatially. Spatially enabled societies represent the realization of the promises offered by building spatial data infrastructures (SDIs) and reforming land administration systems. These building blocks, established over decades, make possible spatially enabled societies. Without tools for managing metadata, building complete national cadastres, modelling and integrating the 3rd dimension, and much other foundational work, spatially enabled societies cannot emerge. This paper explores the notion of spatially enabled societies further. Example applications are used in the discussion. The paper also demonstrates how, despite the grand possibilities of revolutionary spatial technologies and spatially aware citizens, existing infrastructures including SDIs and land administration system will still require an ongoing governance structure for spatially enabled societies to be maintained.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Advanced principles of 3D cadastral data modelling
    AIEN, ALI ; Kalantari, Mohsen ; RAJABIFARD, ABBAS ; WILLIAMSON, IAN ; BENNETT, ROHAN (FIG, 2011)
    Current cadastral data models use a 2D land-parcel definition and extend it to cover 3D requirements. This approach cannot adequately manage and represent the spatial extent of 3D land rights, restrictions and responsibilities (3D RRRs). This paper aims to develop a 3D Cadastral Data Model (3DCDM) to configure 3D cadastral frameworks, manage and represent 3D RRRs, and facilitate 3D cadastre implementation. Three underlying principles have been proposed to develop the 3D Cadastral Data Model (3DCDM). These principles are: • Principle 1: The 2D cadastral data model is a sub-set of the 3D cadastral data model, • Principle 2: The 3D cadastral data model should not only accommodate 3D RRRs and their association with physical objects: the data model should also represent the spatial extent of 3D RRRs, and; • Principle 3: The 3D cadastre data model should cater for a broad range of land administration functions including land tenure, land value, land use, and land development with sufficient detail. These principles are used to assess and modify the core cadastral data model. Additionally, principles related to the legal property object are also used to modify the 3DCDM. The legal property object combines interests and its spatial dimension into a single entity. This creates more flexibility and enables inclusion of complex commodities and all kinds of RRRs. The first version of a 3D Cadastral Data Model (3CDM_Version 1.0) is provided at the end of this paper. 3DCDM maintains both legal and physical parts of 3D objects. The data model has wider application than the traditional requirements of cadastral systems: it is also usable in applications such as urban planning and disaster management.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Lessons for federal countries that have state land registries: the Australian experience
    WILLIAMSON, IAN ; BENNETT, ROHAN ; RAJABIFARD, ABBAS ; WALLACE, JUDE ( 2011)
    The federation of Australia and her states have significantly improved land information management and integration since 1982: cadastres were digitized, land registries computerized, web based GIS was incorporated, and SDIs developed. However, the risk of a Land Information Babel as espoused by Justice Kirby in 1982 still remains, particularly in the realm of land registries. Australia is now entering the era of national approaches to land registration. The proposed national eConveyancing system represents the first step. Many more initiatives will follow. This paper presents a new multi-purpose vision for Australia’s land registries. The state based systems need to continue collaboration in order to build a coherent national vision based around key registries, spatial enablement, and shared services. The power inherent in all land registry information must be unleashed. Land registries are more than simply systems for conveyancing. They are multi-purpose tools with the capacity to service society with the information needed to respond to our most pressing challenges, increasingly with a national focus. Future work must focus on building agreement for this national vision, undertaking a major cost-benefit analysis, comparing existing technical platforms, and creating awareness at higher levels of Australia’s significant land information achievements.