Infrastructure Engineering - Research Publications

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Now showing 1 - 10 of 14
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    On recognizing land administration as critical, public good infrastructure
    Bennett, R ; Tambuwala, N ; Rajabifard, A ; Wallace, J ; Williamson, I (ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2013-01-01)
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    Inter-governmental land information asymmetries in Australia
    Tambuwala, Nilofer ; RAJABIFARD, ABBAS ; BENNETT, ROHAN ; WILLIAMSON, IAN ; WALLACE, JUDE ( 2012)
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    Spatially Enabling Risk for Management of Land and Property
    POTTS, K ; Rajabifard, A ; Williamson, IP (Surveying & Spatial Sciences Institute, 2011)
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    Understanding the relationship between spatial information, property markets and macroeconomic policy
    Tambuwala, N ; Bennett, RM ; Rajabifard, A ; Williamson, IP (Surveying & Spatial Sciences Institute, 2011)
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    Spatially enabled society
    WILLIAMSON, IAN ; RAJABIFARD, ABBAS ; WALLACE, JUDE ; BENNETT, ROHAN (International Federation of Surveyors (FIG), 2011)
    The term 'spatially enabled society' describes the emerging cultural and governance revolution offered by pervasive spatial information technologies and spatially equipped citizens. Spatially enabled societies make possible, amongst many other things, sustainable cities, GFC early warning systems, smarter delivery of housing, improved risk management, and better macroeconomic decision making. The concept is not about managing spatial information, it is about governing society spatially. Spatially enabled societies represent the realization of the promises offered by building spatial data infrastructures (SDIs) and reforming land administration systems. These building blocks, established over decades, make possible spatially enabled societies. Without tools for managing metadata, building complete national cadastres, modelling and integrating the 3rd dimension, and much other foundational work, spatially enabled societies cannot emerge. This paper explores the notion of spatially enabled societies further. Example applications are used in the discussion. The paper also demonstrates how, despite the grand possibilities of revolutionary spatial technologies and spatially aware citizens, existing infrastructures including SDIs and land administration system will still require an ongoing governance structure for spatially enabled societies to be maintained.
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    Spatially enabled risk management: models, cases, validation
    Potts, Katie ; RAJABIFARD, ABBAS ; BENNETT, ROHAN ; WILLIAMSON, IAN (GSDI, 2012)
    Risk has a spatial nature. All events that result from risks have a link to a specific location or a factor in space. Understanding where on earth these risks are present allows for these risks to be mitigated, avoided, or managed. In order to manage the risks however accurate and timely spatial information about land and property is first needed. Historically, land administration systems have held this information, however, in recent years these systems have been superseded by other infrastructures that have the capability to capture and store information spatially. While these new systems offer the advantages of spatially enabled information, the authoritative information held within land administration systems is necessary for risk management. Land administration systems need to adapt to remain relevant in the 21st century, and coordination between these land administration systems and the new infrastructures is required to increase the ability of stakeholders to manage this information for risk management purposes. A framework targeted at this issue has been developed which proposes a spatially enabled approach for managing risks for governments, industry, citizens and wider society that takes into account the current information infrastructures (including land administration systems), the stakeholders, and the relevant risks that affect land and property. This framework results in the aggregation and dissemination of consistent information about risk to land and property to all stakeholders. So far the proposed framework has not been tested; however the recent floods in Queensland present an opportunity to apply the framework in the post event environment to determine whether the framework is appropriate within the Australian context.
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    Land and property information in 3D
    RAJABIFARD, ABBAS ; Kalantari, Mohsen ; WILLIAMSON, IAN (International Federation of Surveyors (FIG), 2012)
    People increasingly live in high density urban, often high rise and multi functional buildings. These increasingly urbanized populations will predominantly live in multi-level, multipurpose, highly engineered, high-rise developments. Cities require significant infrastructure above and below the ground. Rapidly expanding vertical cities and their populations will experience a range of new environmental, social and economic challenges. The lack of an efficient and effective three dimensional solution limits the ability of the public to visualize and communicate 3D developments, the ability of architects, engineers and developers to capitalize on the full potential of 3D title models; the ability of governments and developers to visualize multi-level developments resulting in increased costs and delays; and the ability of land registries to administer a title registration system that can accommodate these increasingly complex multi-level developments. This paper aims to introduce an approach which helps address the problem of modelling and managing complex 3D property rights, restrictions and responsibilities (RRR). The outcomes of this research incorporate the third dimension of height into the land subdivision and development process to build an infrastructure for managing and modelling spatial extension of these complex property RRRs. This research moves the multiple two dimensional drawings that now identify buildings and infrastructure objects and their separate parcels into authentic visual 3D representation of the building and objects that meet the exacting legal standards of ground surveys.
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    Authoritative land information and Australian property markets
    Tambuwala, Nilofer ; RAJABIFARD, ABBAS ; BENNETT, ROHAN ; WALLACE, JUDE ; WILLIAMSON, IAN (International Federation of Surveyors (FIG), 2012)
    Land information has an important role to play in informing macroeconomic policy. In particular, timely and accurate market information relating to land tenure and value is essential for evidence-based fiscal and monetary decisions, such as interest rates on dept financing and assessing property base taxes. Currently in Australia, there appears to be a gap between the creators of land information at the state level and the users of the information at the federal level. The capacity of evidence-based policy is under-realised as a result. This paper explores the inter-governmental land information flows within three state-based land administration systems and the Reserve Bank and Australian Taxation Office. Results of the study show that integration of land market information is occurring within some state land agencies; however communication with federal government departments is limited, leading to information asymmetries. The paper concludes that new options for enabling more seamless land information flows need to be prioritised. Collaboration will be essential.
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    Nations Need National Land Administration Infrastructures
    Bennett, R ; Rajabifard, A ; Williamson, IP ; Wallace, J (FIG (International Federation of Surveyors), 2012)
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    Contemporary land administration: the importance of being infrastructure
    BENNETT, ROHAN ; Tambuwala, Nilofer ; RAJABIFARD, ABBAS ; WILLIAMSON, IAN ; WALLACE, JUDE (International Federation of Surveyors (FIG), 2012)
    Failure to recognize land administration systems as infrastructure potentially creates funding and maintenance problems. Wider economic, social, and environmental benefits of effective land administration are put at risk. Land administration must be recognized as critical, public good infrastructure. Arguments for land administration as infrastructure reside within the land administration discipline: mainstream views regularly fail to recognize the argument. An evaluation approach for testing land administration as an infrastructure is developed and applied. The method utilizes tools for defining and classifying infrastructure, public goods, and critical infrastructures. The analysis tends to support the position of land administration as a critical, public good infrastructure. As a consequence, infrastructure funding and maintenance regimes need to be depoliticized; land administrators must continue to promote land administration outwardly; and the evaluation approach must be extended and enhanced for use in other land administration projects and studies. This paper summarizes a more extended work currently under review with the Journal of Land Use Policy.