Mechanical Engineering - Research Publications

Permanent URI for this collection

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 18
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    The effect of cleaning and repainting on the ship drag penalty
    Utama, IKAP ; Nugroho, B ; Yusuf, M ; Prasetyo, FA ; Hakim, ML ; Suastika, IK ; Ganapathisubramani, B ; Hutchins, N ; Monty, JP (TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2021-04-12)
    Although the hull of a recently dry-docked large ship is expected to be relatively smooth, surface scanning and experimentation reveal that it can exhibit an "orange-peel" roughness pattern with an equivalent sand-grain roughness height ks = 0. 101 mm. Using the known ks value and integral boundary layer evolution, a recently cleaned and coated full-scale ship was predicted to experience a significant increase in the average coefficient of friction %ΔC¯f and total hydrodynamic resistance %ΔR¯T during operation. Here the report also discusses two recently reported empirical estimations that can estimate ks directly from measured surface topographical parameters, by-passing the need for experiments on replicated surfaces. The empirical estimations are found to have an accuracy of 4.5 - 5 percentage points in %ΔC¯f.
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    Non-k-type behaviour of roughness when in-plane wavelength approaches the boundary layer thickness
    Nugroho, B ; Monty, JP ; Utama, IKAP ; Ganapathisubramani, B ; Hutchins, N (CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS, 2021-01-22)
    Abstract
  • Item
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Simulation of large-eddy-break-up device (LEBU) in a moderate Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer
    Chin, C ; Monty, J ; HUTCHINS, N ; Ooi, A ; Orlu, R ; Schlatter, P (Springer, 2016-08-11)
    A well-resolved large eddy simulation (LES) of a large-eddy break-up (LEBU) device in a spatially evolving turbulent boundary layer is performed with, Reynolds number, based on free-stream velocity and momentum-loss thickness, of R e θ ≈ 4300. The implementation of the LEBU is via an immersed boundary method. The LEBU is positioned at a wall-normal distance of 0.8 δ (δ denoting the local boundary layer thickness at the location of the LEBU) from the wall. The LEBU acts to delay the growth of the turbulent boundary layer and produces global skin friction reduction beyond 180δ downstream of the LEBU, with a peak local skin friction reduction of approximately 12 %. However, no net drag reduction is found when accounting for the device drag of the LEBU in accordance with the towing tank experiments by Sahlin et al. (Phys. Fluids 31, 2814, 1988). Further investigation is performed on the interactions of high and low momentum bulges with the LEBU and the corresponding output is analysed, showing a ‘break-up’ of these large momentum bulges downstream of the LEBU. In addition, results from the spanwise energy spectra show consistent reduction in energy at spanwise length scales for λ+z>1000 independent of streamwise and wall-normal location when compared to the corresponding turbulent boundary layer without LEBU.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Structure Inclination Angles in the Convective Atmospheric Surface Layer
    Chauhan, K ; Hutchins, N ; Monty, J ; Marusic, I (SPRINGER, 2013-04-01)
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Towards Reconciling the Large-Scale Structure of Turbulent Boundary Layers in the Atmosphere and Laboratory
    Hutchins, N ; Chauhan, K ; Marusic, I ; Monty, J ; Klewicki, J (SPRINGER, 2012-11-01)
  • Item
  • Item
    No Preview Available
    The Effects of Anisotropic Surface Roughness on Turbulent Boundary-Layer Flow
    Ramani, A ; Nugroho, B ; Busse, A ; Monty, J ; Hutchins, N ; Jelly, T (The University of Queensland, 2020-12-11)
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Turbulent structures in a statistically three-dimensional boundary layer
    Kevin, ; Monty, J ; Hutchins, N (Cambridge University Press (CUP), 2019-01-25)
    We investigate the behaviour of large-scale coherent structures in a spanwise-heterogeneous turbulent boundary layer, using particle image velocimetry on multiple orthogonal planes. The statistical three-dimensionality is imposed by a herringbone riblet surface, although the key results presented here will be common to many cases of wall turbulence with embedded secondary flows in the form of mean streamwise vortices. Instantaneous velocity fields in the logarithmic layer reveal elongated low-momentum streaks located over the upwash-flow region, where their spanwise spacing is forced by the 2δ periodicity of the herringbone pattern. These streaks largely resemble the turbulence structures that occur naturally (and randomly located) in spanwise-homogeneous smooth-/rough-wall boundary layers, although here they are directly formed by the roughness pattern. In the far outer region, the large spanwise spacing permits the streaks to aggressively meander. The mean secondary flows are the time-averaged artefact of the unsteady and spanwise asymmetric large-scale roll modes that accompany these meandering streaks. Interestingly, this meandering, or instability, gives rise to a pronounced streamwise periodicity (i.e. an alternating coherent pattern) in the spatial statistics, at wavelengths of approximately 4.5 δ . Overall, the observed behaviours largely resemble the streak-instability model that has been proposed for the buffer region, only here at a much larger scale and at a forced spanwise spacing. This observation further confirms recent observations that such features may occur at an entire hierarchy of scales throughout the turbulent boundary layer.
  • Item
    Thumbnail Image
    Similarity and structure of wall turbulence with lateral wall shear stress variations
    Chung, D ; Monty, JP ; Hutchins, N (Cambridge University Press (CUP), 2018-07-25)
    Wall-bounded turbulence, where it occurs in engineering or nature, is commonly subjected to spatial variations in wall shear stress. A prime example is spatially varying roughness. Here, we investigate the configuration where the wall shear stress varies only in the lateral direction. The investigation is idealised in order to focus on one aspect, namely, the similarity and structure of turbulent inertial motion over an imposed scale of stress variation. To this end, we analyse data from direct numerical simulation (DNS) of pressure-driven turbulent flow through a channel bounded by walls of laterally alternating patches of high and low wall shear stress. The wall shear stress is imposed as a Neumann boundary condition such that the wall shear stress ratio is fixed at 3 while the lateral spacing s of the uniform-stress patches is varied from 0.39 to 6.28 of the half-channel height 𝛿 . We find that global outer-layer similarity is maintained when s is less than approximately 0.39𝛿 while local outer-layer similarity is recovered when s is greater than approximately 6.28𝛿 . However, the transition between the two regimes through s≈𝛿 is not monotonic owing to the presence of secondary roll motions that extend across the whole cross-section of the flow. Importantly, these secondary roll motions are associated with an amplified skin-friction coefficient relative to both the small- and large- s/𝛿 limits. It is found that the relationship between the secondary roll motions and the mean isovels is reversed through this transition from low longitudinal velocity over low stress at small s/𝛿 to high longitudinal velocity over low stress at large s/𝛿 .