Mechanical Engineering - Research Publications

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    Stress equation based scaling framework for adverse pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers
    Romero, SK ; Zimmerman, SJ ; Philip, J ; Klewicki, JC (Elsevier, 2022-02-01)
    This paper provides a framework for estimating appropriate turbulent velocity scales in adverse pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers (APG TBLs) via a study of the mean stress balance. We examine the velocity scales of APG TBLs using the relationship between the Reynolds shear stress and pressure stress. It is reasoned that as distance from the wall increases the velocity scaling transitions from one dominated by the wall-shear-stress velocity scale, uτ, to a scaling dominated by the pressure stress. A velocity scale, uhyb, is proposed that varies with distance from the wall and combines the wall-shear-stress velocity with a pressure-stress-based velocity. This investigation uses new high Reynolds number (7000≲Reτ≲7800) experimental measurements, existing lower Reynolds number experimental (600≲Reτ≲2000) and computational (Reτ<700) data sets. The proposed velocity scale realizes similarity in the turbulent stress profiles to a degree that is superior to that achievable via any wall-distance-independent velocity scale when considering the full extent of the flow domain.
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    Simultaneous micro-PIV measurements and real-time control trapping in a cross-slot channel
    Akbaridoust, F ; Philip, J ; Hill, DRA ; Marusic, I (Springer, 2018-12-01)
    Here we report novel micro-PIV measurements around micron-sized objects that are trapped at the centre of a stagnation point flow generated in a cross-slow microchannel using real-time control. The method enables one to obtain accurate velocity and strain rate fields around the trapped objects under straining flows. In previous works, it has been assumed that the flow field measured in the absence of the object is the one experienced by the object in the stagnation point flow. However, the results reveal that this need not be the case and typically the strain rates experienced by the objects are higher. Therefore, simultaneously measuring the flow field around a trapped object is needed to accurately estimate the undisturbed strain rate (away from the trapped object). By combining the micro-PIV measurements with an analytical solution by Jeffery (Proc R Soc Lond A 102(715):161–179, 1922), we are able to estimate the velocity and strain rate around the trapped object, thus providing a potential fluidic method for characterising mechanical properties of micron-sized materials, which are important in biological and other applications.
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    A framework to develop data-driven turbulence models for flows with organised unsteadiness
    Lav, C ; Sandberg, RD ; Philip, J (Elsevier, 2019-04-15)
    Turbulence modelling development has received a boost in recent years through assimilation of machine learning methods and increasing availability of high-fidelity datasets. This paper presents an approach that develops turbulence models for flows exhibiting organised unsteadiness. The novel framework consists of three parts. First, using triple decomposition, the high-fidelity data is split into organised motion and stochastic turbulence. A data-driven approach is then used to develop a closure only for the stochastic part of turbulence. Finally, unsteady calculations are conducted, which resolve the organised structures and model the unresolved turbulence using the developed bespoke turbulence closure. A case study of a wake with vortex shedding behind a normal flat plate, at a Reynolds number of 2,000, based on plate height and freestream velocity, is considered to demonstrate the method. The approach shows significant improvement in mean velocity and Reynold stress profiles compared with standard turbulence models.
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    Spatial averaging effects on the streamwise and wall-normal velocity measurements in a wall-bounded turbulence using a cross-wire probe
    Baidya, R ; Philip, J ; Hutchins, N ; Monty, JP ; Marusic, I (IOP Publishing, 2019-08-01)
    The spatial averaging effects due to a cross-wire probe on the measured turbulence statistics in a wall-bounded flow are investigated using a combined approach of direct numerical simulation data, theoretical methods and experiments. In particular, the wire length (l), spacing ( ) and angle ( ) of a cross-wire probe configured to measure the streamwise and wall-normal velocities are systematically varied to isolate effects of each parameter. The measured streamwise velocity from a cross-wire probe is found to be an average of the filtered velocities sensed by the two wires. Thus, in general, an increase in the sensor dimensions when normalised by viscous units leads to an attenuated variance for the streamwise velocity ( ), resulting from a larger contribution to the spatial averaging process from poorly correlated velocities. In contrast, the variance for the wall-normal velocity ( ) can be amplified, and this is shown to be the result of an additional contributing term (compared to ) due to differences in the filtered wire-normal velocity between the two wires. This additional term leads to a spurious wall-normal velocity signal, resulting in an amplified variance recorded by the cross-wire probe. Compared to the streamwise and wall-normal velocity variances, the Reynolds shear stress ( ) perhaps surprisingly shows less variation when l, and are varied. The robustness of Reynolds shear stress to the finite sensor size is due to two effects: (i) Reynolds shear stress is devoid of energetic contributions from the near-isotropic fine scales unlike the and statistics, hence cross-wire probe dimensions are typically sufficiently small in terms of viscous unit to adequately capture the statistics for a range of l and investigated; (ii) the dependency arises due to cross terms between the filtered velocities from two wires, however, it turns out that these terms cancel one another in the case of Reynolds shear stress, but not for the and statistics. We note that this does not, however, suggest that is easier to measure accurately than the normal stresses; on the contrary, in a companion paper (Baidya et al 2019 Meas. Sci. Technol. 30 085301) we show that measurements are more prone to errors due to uncertainty in probe geometry and calibration procedure.
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    Sensitivity of turbulent stresses in boundary layers to cross-wire probe uncertainties in the geometry and calibration procedure
    Baidya, R ; Philip, J ; Hutchins, N ; Monty, JP ; Marusic, I (IOP Publishing, 2019-08-01)
    The sensitivity of measured turbulent stresses to uncertainties in the probe geometry and calibration procedure is investigated for a cross-wire probe in a turbulent boundary layer using direct numerical simulation data. The errors investigated are guided by experiments, and to replicate the full experimental procedure, the cross-wire calibration procedure is simulated to generate a voltage-to-velocity mapping function, which is then utilised to calculate the measured velocity from simulated cross-wire voltages. We show that wire misalignment can lead to an incorrect mean wall-normal velocity and Reynolds shear stress in the near-wall region due to the presence of shear. Furthermore, we find that misalignment in the wire orientation cannot be fully accounted for through the calibration procedure, presumably due to increased sensitivity to an out-of-plane velocity component. This has strong implications if using a generic commercial cross-wire probe, since inclining these probes to gain access to the near-wall region can lead to a large error (up to 10%) in turbulent stresses and these errors can manifest in the log region and beyond to half the boundary layer thickness. For uncertainties introduced during the calibration procedure, the Reynolds shear stress is observed to exhibit an elevated sensitivity compared with other turbulent stresses. This is consistent with empirical observations where the repeatability in the Reynolds shear stress is found to be the poorest.
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    Kinematics of local entrainment and detrainment in a turbulent jet
    Mistry, D ; Philip, J ; Dawson, JR (Cambridge University Press (CUP), 2019-07-25)
    In this paper we investigate the continuous, local exchange of fluid elements as they are entrained and detrained across the turbulent/non-turbulent interface (TNTI) in a high Reynolds number axisymmetric jet. To elucidate characteristic kinematic features of local entrainment and detrainment processes, simultaneous high-speed particle image velocimetry and planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements were undertaken. Using an interface-tracking technique, we evaluate and analyse the conditional dependence of local entrainment velocity in a frame of reference moving with the TNTI in terms of the interface geometry and the local flow field. We find that the local entrainment velocity is intermittent with a characteristic length scale of the order of the Taylor micro-scale and that the contribution to the net entrainment rate arises from the imbalance between local entrainment and detrainment rates that occurs with a ratio of two parts of entrainment to one part detrainment. On average, an increase in local entrainment is correlated with excursions of the TNTI towards jet centreline into regions of higher streamwise momentum, convex surface curvature facing the turbulent side of the jet and along the leading edges of the interface. In contrast, detrainment is correlated with excursions of the TNTI away from the jet centreline into regions of lower streamwise momentum, concave surface curvature and along the trailing edge. We find that strong entrainment is characterised by a local counterflow velocity field in the frame of reference moving with the TNTI which enhances the transport of rotational and irrotational fluid elements. On the other hand, detrainment is characterised by locally uniform flow fields with the local fluid velocity on either side of the TNTI advecting in the same direction. These local flow patterns and the strength of entrainment or detrainment rates are also observed to be strongly influenced by the presence and relative strength of vortical structures which are of the order of the Taylor micro-scale that populate the turbulent region along the jet boundary.
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    Pressure and spanwise velocity fluctuations in turbulent channel flows: Logarithmic behavior of moments and coherent structures
    Mehrez, A ; Philip, J ; Yamamoto, Y ; Tsuji, Y (American Physical Society, 2019-04-02)
    We study the logarithmic behavior of the pressure variance (p+2) from the datasets obtained from direct numerical simulations of turbulent channel flow for friction Reynolds number Reτ up to 4000. The higher-order moments of p were found to follow logarithmic behaviors at the same distances from the wall where (p+2) shows its log profile. The same results have been confirmed for the spanwise velocity fluctuations w at the same Reynolds numbers, with both p and w following a super-Gaussian behavior. The minimum Reynolds number for (p+2) and (w+2) log profiles to appear is Reτ≈500, where flow structures O(h) or less were found to significantly contribute to these profiles. The configuration of the hairpin eddy structures obtained from the conditional sampling at different wall-normal locations showed a strong link between p and w fluctuations. Positive pressure fluctuations are located between the legs of the hairpin eddy, while the negative pressure fluctuations are consistent with the head part of the hairpin eddy. Positive and negative spanwise velocity fluctuations are strongly positioned with the legs of the hairpin eddy, consistent with the counter-rotating motion resulting from the eddy legs. The structures were also found to be geometrically self-similar such that their length and their width increase linearly with the distance from the wall.
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    Revisiting the law of the wake in wall turbulence
    Krug, D ; Philip, J ; Marusic, I (CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS, 2017-01-25)
    The streamwise mean velocity profile in a turbulent boundary layer is classically described as the sum of a log law extending all the way to the edge of the boundary layer and a wake function. While there is theoretical support for the log law, the wake function, defined as the deviation of the measured velocity profile from the log law, is essentially an empirical fit and has no real physical underpinning. Here, we present a new physically motivated formulation of the velocity profile in the outer region, and hence for the wake function. In our approach, the entire flow is represented by a two-state model consisting of an inertial self-similar region designated as ‘pure wall flow state’ (featuring a log-law velocity distribution) and a free stream state, which results in a jump in velocity at the interface separating the two. We show that the model provides excellent agreement with the available high Reynolds number mean velocity profiles if this interface is assumed to fluctuate randomly about a mean position with a Gaussian distribution. The new concept can also be extended to internal geometries in the same form, again confirmed by the data. Furthermore, adopting the same interface distribution in a two-state model for the streamwise turbulent intensities, with unchanged parameters, also yields a reliable and consistent prediction for the decline in the outer region of these profiles in all geometries considered. Finally, we discuss differences between our model interface and the turbulent/non-turbulent interface (TNTI) in turbulent boundary layers. We physically interpret the two-state model as lumping the effects of internal shear layers and the TNTI into a single discontinuity at the interface.
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    Global and local aspects of entrainment in temporal plumes
    Krug, D ; Chung, D ; Philip, J ; Marusic, I (CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS, 2017-02-10)
    To date, the understanding of the role buoyancy plays in the entrainment process in unstable configurations such as turbulent plumes remains incomplete. Towards addressing this question, we set up a flow in which a plume evolves in time instead of space. We demonstrate that the temporal problem is equivalent to a spatial plume in a strong coflow and address in detail how the temporal plume can be realized via direct numerical simulation. Using numerical data of plume simulations up to $Re_{\unicode[STIX]{x1D706}}\approx 100$, we show that the entrainment coefficient can be determined consistently using a global entrainment analysis in an integral framework as well as via a local approach. The latter is based on a study of the local propagation of the turbulent/non-turbulent interface relative to the fluid. Locally, this process is dominated by small-scale diffusion which is amplified by interface convolutions such that the total entrained flux is independent of viscosity. Further, we identify a direct buoyancy contribution to entrainment by baroclinic torque, which accounts for 8 %–12 % of the entrained flux locally, comparable to the 15 % buoyancy contribution at the integral level. It appears that the baroclinic torque is a mechanism that might explain higher values of the entrainment coefficient in spatial plumes compared with jets.
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